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Full text of "Technique: Published Annually by the Junior Class of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology"

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Coi'YklGHT. isy7. 
BY 

Thi: Tkchmc^ue Board of NiNKTV-fcuiHT. 



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PRINTtO BY FRANK WOOD, BOSTON. 



Co m mcmorp 

or our lau UloiKd President. 

francis ilmasa Walker. 

illl tDat map be lOortDP in tW$ Uook 

is arrectionatelp dedicated. 




Oteot3 



Di 



Thk Faculty . . 31 

FRANtis Amasa Walker 33 

Fraternities 77 

L.KAL SOCEKTEKS 99 

M.MtAL 0«„AM/AT1<>VS 133 

PirBLIlATK.NS 169 

Ateiletks ,75 

WiLUAU MoN'TACrEC IIALL 213 

Arch ITF.CTIT DAL Si'mmicr School Ji6 

Technology Club 319 

Verse 151 

Quo 

Statest 

Rege.sti 




THE Technique Board of '98 feels that it has labored under peculiar 
dilTicuUies. Aside from the blow that has fallen upon the Institute at 
large, the Board has suffered two severe misfortunes in the sudden death 
of one of its members, and in the illness and absence for a time of the 
Editor in Chief. 

The two especial ends sought in this book have been, valuable and ac- 
curate statistics, and humor which should amuse and not offend. "A 
jest's prosperity," however, "lies in the ear of him that hears it, never in 
the tongue of him that makes it." The EditoR ask, then, for a charitable 
construction upon this part of their work, not one line of which has been 
penned in other than a spirit of cordial good nature. Everything in the 
book is, as usual, exclusively the work of undergraduates and alumni of 
the Institute. 

The Board is especially pleased to have been enabled to present the 
book in a more pleasing shape than has been possible in the past, by the 
addition of a leather binding. 

The Editors trust that the shortcomings in their work may be extenu- 
ated by the circumstances mentioned, while the praise for any merit the 
volume may contain is due to the Class of '98, in whose name this 
Technique is edited and published. 



^r~' 




dor 



luminK""" Hall. 



. Foutth L-A^riiii .iikI 111 iiI-i'Ik' Vcn-in ktluri' . " Giit'Ih.'i Hitttisi 
The Court»hii> C.I Mil<> Sl.iiiiliih," l.y l>n.f.«-,>r \"i{.l, 

Anniu] Sjirini; Cunn-rl i>f llic^ CikT. Hanjn, and M.incloliii Cluli- ill I 
. TSCHNIQUE. Volume XI., istut^d. 
. JunlDtPrnniEiiadvlnPlcrccllnll. 
. RKCptloD of Ihe Hnud of Edllut* of "I hu Ttch," in " Ihr Tin^h " oHice. 

TKhnolOKyThtHttriral!, iiiKliTlhcnianiiirciiirnl nl' (he WulkctCluK ill Copley Mull. 
. T«h. Socicly at l'liil:id.lplii;i fnnufd, iiC th.- Ciloniia<lc Hmel, PWIadelphia. 

ofthcl'tlivi-tsilynC IVriii-vhilUill. 

.MAV, 



"on hy Niiiely-dEhl; itcore, i 



>. Exhibilinn ol <1»- Ik 








IllisliIliuhSch 


"IC 




:>t M.'.'h;inics 


Hill 


W. M. Coni.' »iii9 






nolovY. 
















cnlle 


by B Dinner HI the 


-.ndora.^ 




. N. E. 1. A. A. M»l 


31 WotCMtrr. 





17. Outdoor CInsi Championihip Gamct. Chuinpionihip won by th 



Hunllngton Hall. 
. Bmccalaurealc Senium hy the Ite>. Dr. Donald, of Tilnity Churdh, in Trinil 
. Ninety -ail CUsa Dar eierciie*. 
. GnduatinK Hi<:rds». Hunlin|;lnn Hall. 

SEPTEMBER. 

. The thirty.lirtl luhool ycHr of the Institute opens with 1.100 enrolled iluden 



I 

* 

t 



OCTOBER. 

3. Y. M. C. A. Reception to the Class of Nineteen Hundred. 

3. Annual Address to the Freshman Class, by President Walker, in Huntington Hall. 

7. The Technology Club formally opened. 

Q. Athletic Mass Meeting, held in Huntington Hall. 

10. The Republican Club organized. 

24. Fall Handicap Games, on the Irvington Oval. 
30. Republican Parade of Students. 

NOVEMBER. 

9. Annual Cross-Country Run. Osgood, '97, won; time, 2S rain. 56^ sec. 

11. Annual Sophomore-Freshman Cane Rush and Football Game, on South End Grounds. Rush resulted 

in a lie between Ninety-nine and Nineteen Hundred; score, 19-19. Game won by Ninety-nine; score, 
6-0. 

DECEMBER. 

I a. Annual Indoor Class Championship Games, in the Gymnasium. Championship won by the Class of 

Ninety-eight. 
19. L'Avenir Theatricals, in Huntington Hall. 

23. Arbitration Committee selected to decide whether the Freshmen could carry canes. 
35. Annual Alumni Dinner, at the Exchange Club. 
30. Annual Winter Concert of Glee, Banjo, and Mandolin Clubs, in Huntington Hall. 



JANUARY, 1S97. 



5. Death of President Francis Amasa Walker. 

Student Mass Meeting held to make arrangements for the funeral. 
{. S. Funeral of President Francis Amasa Walker, from Trinity Church. 

I All meetings, dinners, meets, etc. were suspended by the student body for thirty days. 

FEBRUARY. 
j6. Election of the Ninety -nine Technique Electoral Committee. 

MARCH. 

6. Dinner of the Senior Class, Young's Hotel. Toastmaster, Harry W. Allen. 
Dinner of the Junior Class, Exchange Club. Toastmaster, Herbert I. Lord. 

14. Annual Open Scratch Games of M. I. T. A. C, in the Gymnasium. 
19. Dinner of the Sophomore Class, Hotel Brunswick. Toastmaster, Arthur L. Hamilton. 
27. Dinner of the Freshman Class, at Young's Hotel. Toastmaster, Clifford M. Leonard. 
Completion of the election of the Board of Editors of Tkchnicu^e, '99. 

APRIL. 
9. Athletic Mass Meeting held in Huntington Hall. 
19. Opening of Junior Week. 
33. TBCHNIQUE, Volume XII., issued. 
Junior Promenade, in Pierce Hall. 

33. Reception of the Board of Editors of " The Tech," in "The Tech " Office. 
Technology Theatricals, under the management of the Walker Club, in the Bijou Theatre. 

34. Annual Spring Concert of the Glee, Mandolin, and Banjo Clubs in Association Hall. 




•sidtHt. 

\.. Walker." 



John 1>. Rvnki.e. 
Frederic W. Lincoln. 
William "E\dki>tt, Jr. 



\\<j\ 



Char 
Da VI I 



I .\. C.\. 



R. Wii 



Lewis Wm. Tai-pan.Ji 
Henrv V>. Uyi>e. 
Alexan-dkr S. Wheel 
James P. Tolman. 
Howard Stockton. 
Eliot C. Clarke. 
Nathanibl Thaver. 
Charles F. Choatb. 
Henrv L. Pierce.* 



HiR 



1 F. Mil 



Pkrcival Lowell. 



Arthur T. Lvman. 
Charles Merriam. 
Thornton K. L'othrop. 
Charles C, Jackson. 
Saml-el M. Fhlton. 
Desmond Fitzgerald. 

Francis Blake. 
Charles W. lluRRARn. 
James M. Crafts, 
Thomas L. Livermore. 
A. Lawrence Rotch. 
William H. Forbes. 
John R. Freeman. 
George A. Gardner. 
William H. Lincoln. 
J. B. Sbwall, 
Thomas Gakfield. 
Charles L. Lovering. 
A. Lawrence Lowell. 



On tktpartof tit CommonmeaU*. 

Hi.s Excellency Gov. Roger Wolcott. 

Hon. Walbridgb A. Field, Ckitfjnstica o/tkt Suprtmt Conrl. 

Hon. Frank A. YiwA., Stcrtlary of Iht Board of BdiieaUoH. 



MX>Q.Tnx&ccaMaioa 




PrtsidtMt. 
Fraxus a Wal 



Secrrtary. 
Hahkv W. Tylbr. 



Al.HERT M. KN'ICIIT. 



Officers of Instruction. 



Francis A. Walkkh. Ph.D.. 1J-.1>., Prtiideni* 
Amlieist follege. A. K. E., *. B. K. 
A.H.. .\iiiliei>t. Yio; ,\.M.. Amherst, '(>},- Vale. "73; 

'94; Lt..l)., Viile, "ii, AmliiTst, '8j, Harvard, '83, 

'88, Dulilhi, -9.;. Kditiburgii, \fo. 

In tJnlli'd SUKi 




iKi miliUrv urrice, iSfii-Oc; InXructat WlUistnii Semi, 
tor SpringReld (M*u.) Republion, iSfiS; Chief Burcnu 
ihinclon, iStei SupcrinlcnScnt Ninth Ccniui, USto-tj: 

- Indian AffHin, iSn; Pinr»s»r of Folllicnl Economy and 

\K\a.>Ti. Sheffield Scientific School. iSii-Si; Honnrsry menibeT, Royal 
btmiMlcal Sncielv nf London, 1S75; Chief, Bure^iu of Awarde, Phlladel. 
phi:i, 1S761 Meniber, Hchoot Commtnee, New Ha>en, 1N77-S0; Hemher. 
Ito^ird or Kducalion, Cnanectlcul, iS7;-«i; trfwtuttr, Johns llopkina UnU 
vcnlty, iSTT-n; United Slule* Coniinliaianer, Mnnetiry Conferenre al 

Istendeot 'Aalh Cenaiu, 



Pmideut, MnuHChuwtbt Inntiliitc of Technoiosy, sine 



nnnecUcut, iSyg; Supcrli 

, _ _ . sHchuMtbt Inntiiiitc of ' _^, .__ 

. II Stallilieal Auadatlnn, ilnce i^Ai; Leclnrer in Kl. 

vKTd InlvL-nllT, iHSi-!U, i9|i5-9&: Membw, MaiMchiuelti Hlalorlcal 

SoriL-tv. iSt.ii Hcmber, MiiuaclbnKtta Hoard of KducUion IgSt-go; Chair- 

Tii;iii, MaaaachiueltiTnpoBnuibkail SnrveyCnmmlBrion, ilfi4'aa; Memher, 

School Cnrnmlltee of feogtiin, iWs-NHl Member, Inlernullnnal SlaUKilcal 

Inslltule, iM)c (HnnonrT member and President AdMnt, tNui) ; Pmldenl, 

American Economic AsMCiaUan, liiSs-oi: Honorarv niemGcr, American 

Sodeiy of Mech;mlc;il EnKlne>n, iSSb; Senator of the Phi Beta Kaon, aincv 

enlral Slallatlcal CommlsiloB of Belslun, iSSSj Corrwnnndlnfr memKr, Call. 

ivocm, iSSS; Uffinr »F the French lAion ofHouor, iSGg;Vii:B President, 

Sciencea, since itei: PrealdenI, UlUlarv HlRiwIcal Society nf MaHachiuetu, 

-■'-—< ofBofltan, Jince ibo; Member, Park C ' ■- ' " 

ted Stales CnninitBiaiier In Monetary Ci 



o Monetary Coofbrence al 
aociriy of *'^ — *--^ — iw...^. — ,« 

fitShalJnB. 

'Sj^'of^' 



a Fair Manaiterc, iRiu-gt; Vice PraKb-at, Society nf Naval Arehlteeii and 

e Enalneer*, since iSvj; Corregpondent of Ibe Inslilute of France. iSui; Cnrrespnndlnir 
__ ._ ,_..__ '--■-„ Xd.Bnceni.iit of Scieow, 1S94; Member. Board of ■KusI.es, 



Public Ubrary of Bminn. iSgA. 

AuthnroflheSLiIisIlcal AUas nf Ihe L'nited SUlei' (1S74): The Indbn Uue<II<in (1S74); The 
Wages gjKilion (1876); Hooey (iS^)l Moniv, Trade, nod Industry (1S74); Poliikal kconoinv 
(iS»j); Ijtnd and Its Rent (iSSj); lllntory »l the Svcniid Army Corns (issii): Klrit IjrBsons in 
PoIKIcal Economy (1SS9); life of Gen. W. S. Hancock (>><M)t The Makinv oflbe Nation (iSt^): 

. ,___■ "^ -urtjjij.oi (iSdi): also, RepottsoniheCoinmerce and Naviuntiim of Ihe I'nitEd Slaun. 

n Aflairs C^'K and the Censiue* of 1S70 and iSSo. Addnssvs on Economic, 
gtioiial, and Militaiy anbiecta. Articles in Lalor's Cyclopzdiil of Polillcil Science. 
l^ncvcioBiraia Dritannica, Jahnsnn'a cfrclopaidla, Ihe Centurv Maaailne, Scrlbner'a, Atlantic 
Monthly, Princeton Review, Harper's HaKBaine, LlpplncoU's', Konh American, Yale Revieiv, 
Qparterlv loumal of Political Science, Journal nf Pollircal Economy, Inlernallonal Rrvi.->i-, Forum. 
(Siunerlv Inurnal nf Economic!, Proceedlnea of American Economic Association, Journal of 
American !it.itlsliciil Association, Journal of Americau Social Science Association, Tohimloijv 



O^ Q3 a;? Q^ Q0 Qp Q^ 





B.S., A.M.. Harvard University, 'i;: ; Ph.D., Hamilton Col- 
lege, '67; LL.D., WeslcvanVniversitj-, '71. 

S41 Editor Hmhcinsticur Momhiv. i»T»^i : Pref'itor'ol MuhcmJtlc^ 
Ma>,:>;LChu.«ll ln>t[[uU of Technology, from .Stji Acting Pr«id«.t, 
18(^70; PnaldenC, iS70-;S. 

Author or New Tiblci' for DetcrmininE the Vatuee of tin Ca.«ffideiiU 
in Ihc Perturhative Fundion of Plinrl:irv Mntion. the Manual Elcmcnl in 
Kducutinn (publii.hcd In REport of MitfichuKtu Board of Edutrilioo) 
{iS;6-;7), a lerond Paper on lume anhject In Report of iSSo-Si. Report on 
Industrial Education, Americ:iii InalitulE of Rducation [iSSj), AnatfUc 



., Pra/eisor of Mathemalia 



Prnrt-^Hor of Malhrir 



IKS M. CrAkTs. S.B., Pro/if^or of Organic CAtmi>^ 

Harvanl S. S.. '^S. 






i>BERT II. RK-|tARn.s, S.B., Profeiior of Mining BHginetring 
and Meialliirgx'. 

M. I. T.. ■68, III. 

In Chemlury, Maiiachuutlt Inilllule of Tcthnnlnajr, 
,_ . , -■"-"-—■ Amlysii, 186^-70; A Bii 



Anilysti, iS6u-ia: ' 
PmfHio. of Mfncn 



^: Initruclor in AmnvlnK and qualilalivi 
Prar»>ar of AnaliUcal CbnniMrT. 1870-71 

AsSBVinir.ip charge of the Mining and Mt „ _,. 

7»; P«.[eK«>rof B?ining Eoginceflnit, iSrj-S,; Secretary of the Kacully, 
iS;9-St; Proftsfor oflHininB Ennrnrcriiig and Metallurity fmm 1SS4; 
President of M. I T. Alumni Aitodallon. ■S;j-t6; Pniidcnlofthe Anieri- 



liurgical Lab. 



■ ng Engin. 



LIAM II. Nii.KS, I'ir.B., A.M., Profisior 0/ Gtelogy and 
Gtografky. 



I'll.B.. Y«k S. S., -67; A.M., Wesleva 



ProfcsHot ..f Pli«nicHl Gt.igwphy, Mu.l 

nolony, iS;i ; Profc»sorofG™li.|[y and Oi'ngnipliy. Mas 



Bar orOeokiLiT, Wcllealey College, 1^^' Pieildent of the^Boaton 
>' or NaluraJ Pillory from iScri. 
Author of Airrncv of (llaeien in the Eicivation of VilltTn and Ijike 
nasini, ;!oiics iifl'hvilcal Pcatun-i of Mouiilains, Some Eipuniions, Move. 
menl*. and l-raOun.:i of Kncks, •4<«.'rved at Monion. MasB„The Caulcl of 
Ihe Keeenl Hoodi In Germany (iliSyI.etc. 
Hi-tldence, 10 Linden Street, Cambridge. 



■[i,\l.HK> R. Crc)ss. S.B., Tbaytr Pro/esser 0/ Pkysics and 

Direrior of Iht Rogers I.ahoralory. 
M. I. T.. '70, Sd. and Lll. Course. 

Inslrutlnr in Phytic*, Ma»«achii»elt. Imlilule of Tedhnolojiy. iSpj-ji j 
Affilslanl Prnfesior of Physica, iSti-ts; Ppofettor ofPhyiici from 1875, In 
charge ofDepartment of Phjgicl from iSr; in charKC of ConrH' in KlfCtrJcal 






Author '.f in 






:1iei< of'physicB, chlelly published In the Pnn 
ice. Upland Itoad 



Gaet.isi) Lanza, C.E., Professor of TAeoreiical and Applied 
Aferkanio. 

L'tiiverBity of Virginia. '70. 

Pmressor, iB?^;; \ Prafeiaor ol 'I'hvarelical and Applied iiluhanici from 
■S7S- 

Aulharof Nolo on Mechanics] Engineering (1SS6), Notes on Friclinn 
(1SS7), Applied Mechanics {i58c), and of many papers in Traniacliona 
American Society Mechanical EngineerE, ProceedlnKO Society of Arts, 
Proceeding* Briiish InsiUuIion of Civil EnKlncem, Technology Q.uarlerly, 

Residence, u \V«t Cedar Street. 



131 



EORGE F. Swain, S.B., M. Am. Soc. C. E., Hayaard Professor 
of Civil BngineeriHg. 
M. I.T.,-77. I. 

Sludt'nt In (lerm.-iny, iS7;-Si)i Eipert onTepth U. S. Ccneui, iSSo-Sjl 
Initruclor Jn Ovjl EneinecnnK. MKssat^huMlu InXiltiU of Tcehnaloit;. 
.aSi-JSj; A«isunt Prf,f«*or or Civil Epgi,.«riiiK, .^j-S?; Associate 



.3.M. 



.ersfroniiSST; I 

ilhot of Report on Wati 
;araulic» and on TKcory of S 

UJchiiiMW 'n^foSJcoiiimi 



Power 



lOns of Ami-ncan Society Civil En- 
eineers, Proceeding New Rnalanil Walcr Wnrlii AssocijitionAechnnlogy 
Huarteriv, Pra<:ee<niiK> Society Arts, Journ.l Franklin Institute. 



[nst. Arch., Profess 

Architects, \y^^•M,■, Student in 

tme of 'rechnoloiry, iSrtu; Assintanl SupetviiinE Architect at WiihinR- 
lou, iS7n-7j: in parlmrihip ivilh Mr. E. C. Cabot, o( Boiton, 1S7.1-SS; 

Author of A Fcwllinls About Drainage (iSSS), Con 

I). Nolea on Un.es. C-inenls, Mortarj, an '- " 

Residence, njj Marlboro Strt'el. 



J Daell. LL.D., Professor of Modern Lan- 

gungfs. 
B.A., Callage Saint Servais (Liege), '64; Ph.C, Louvain, 
■6s; LL.D., University de Litgc, '(A. 

Professor ^.f Modern Lan({iiaKei, KenlucliyCc.lleiiB, 1S76-79; Instructor 
utnn HlRh^aDl Latin Schools, iSS6-iSSv; 






Davis R. Dkwev. A.B., Ph.D., Professor of Economics and 
Stalislics. 
University ofVermont, '79; ^. *. ; ♦. B. K. 
A.B., Lniveraitv of Vermont, '79; I'li.D., Jolins Hopkinft 
L'niverBily. '86. 

Tcachsr, llndcrhitJ, Vt., iS?u-Si; Principal II ydc Park High Schnol, 
Chicaeo, 1SS1-S3: Sludent and Kellrnv it Jofins IlopkltK Unlvi-rilty, i8S<- 
S61 In-lructor, MmsachuKtU loBtitule of Technology, 1SS7-SS; AB>isUn( 
Proresior. iSSS-Ss; Auoclute Prof«»r, iS8o-«; Profeaooc rmm iSu; 
Sccrelorv Ainerican SMIislical AlsncUtloa TrDin 1^36; editor of lu publl- 
cationtfrnm 1SB7; Appoinled. lSi)|-<u. CtmiTmBn of Board lo InvHIiicBte 
the Subject r>r the Vnemployed in Muuchuieni; Member of Publicitioa 

orB^rd"o°nveMls>teCha^^hXI'Liid"Rec!rm»tak- Interest" aiidTuli 
(ions at MassHchuEClU, I&m. 

Author of a Rvllabua on PoLilical History since .SiJ (iSSj). Syllabut of 
Lecturer on Kco'noinic Queitionii of Commerce (iS|i), revlei.i in Pub. 
licalions of American Stiillitlcal A»ociatlona. Suicides in New England, 






iSSs-oli Pro. 



11.AS \V. \h,\.>,i\s.&.B.. Frefesior of Physics. 
M. I. T., '76, VIII. 

Assisiai.1, MassachuKltj Instilulc of Technology, li 
iSSo-Si; Assistant Professor, lS^J-S; Associ— ■•-'" 
f<;<isnr from iSiij. 

Author of Physical Laboratory Note" (iSSsl.The Effect of Temper. 
atun> on the Viseositv of Air and Carbon Dioiiae (iSSft), Dlicu.sion of Ihe 
Precision of Me-j-urcinentB (1SS7}, KrictionofLcather Belts on Iron Pul- 
hrys. Standard for Ihe Resistance of Copper (uSiiO.and numerous other 

Appalai^iia. Journa^f KrankHn Inslitu'te^Tech oology Q^anerly, etc?" ' 
Residence, H<4e] llkley. 




'iltv Aljiebra^ Collein Alvehrj, Plane and SoNd' Gilmetry, >lane 
--■--■■ Trigononielry, LoSarilh.nic Tables, etc. 



.■77.11- 



ind EniiineerInK, Imuerlal Airrlcultural Cotleue, Japan, iS;<^Vtel Assiit- 

■ -oressor ol^ilmSanieal Bngineering, Uni"ers,if 0/ lllfnoit. .S8.-S.t; 

etor, MuKichuKCIti InMitute ot ^echnolnfty, iSSl-Si: Asiiatant 

Lsor of Steam Enfcineerinx, i>«4-So; Aswciale Professor, 1SS9-9J; 

"--'-- Knginecring from i«6;j. 

id Kly Whce 






Gear>ri!«7],ThermodynamlL-<oflheSlcHinEnitlneandniherIlL-aIKngines 
(iSSo), Tables of the Properties of Saturated Steam (■»)«), Valve Cear. 
for steam EDf^nei (iSyo), Steam Boiler" ' " -' ■-'■"- '" '" "■" ' 



with E. ¥. Mill 




S.B., M. I. T., '84; Ph.D., Erlangen. ' 

Asiltlanl. MiunchuKtla InitiCuU of Techn 

iSSA-90; A^tsUnl PrDfcMor. iSw-91; Atiodi 

nbryof the Faculty, 1SS9-9D and fro.n l-iji; 1 



Bates, Litt.D,, Profasor ofEngUtk. 

Boudoin, '76; A. A. *. ; ♦. B. K. 

Editor of BroidBlde. 1875-70; Editor of Boston Couri.r, iS&Hw; corre. 
BDondcnt ol Providence Journil, Chicago Tribune, Book Buyer, eic, iSSo- 
91; PmrcMior of Knglilh. MxsHchuKtto Itiitilute of Technology from 

Aiithornr P^iKy's Perveriltiei, The Paicniii, A Wheel of Fire, Berriei 
of the Briar, SoimetB in Shadow, A Liid-K I.ove, The Philistine*, Prince 
Vance, Allirciht. Booli o' Nine Tales, The Poei and His Self, Told in the 
r.ale. In the Bundle of Time, The Torch Be;irer>, and Talk> on Wriling 
E.,Bli.h. 



_..t Point, i^th-m: uried unjer Gcnerult Crook and Hllci 

Tenth C;iviilrT agalnit Apache Chief Gemnimo in Arizona, iSii-S6: 

leral biitrlct Cotumbin Milllia, <^T-^: with Tenlh Cavalry 



r of Artkileetaral Design. 



i'riiin.SS.>.Lau 

I Buildinift and P 
rof (hcNen Min 






!S 



Petrr SfHW \mh. S.B., Professor of hUchanism and Director of 
tie Workshops. 
M. I.T.,'78, tt. 

Sluricnl, MMUchut 



. iStv^. Dnuichtiin 



, i*;jJM; A«8i 




C. 1'rank Al[.k\. S.B., M, Am. Soc. C. K., Professor of Rail- 
road EngiareriHg. 
M. I. T., jj, 1. 



liH-er, Vr<y 



5-76: EdkIi 






, ll(HI 



; AsiliUnt 



H'lirkH, and Konenil eiiKiiwerinir, iSSo; AolibiDt Enirincrr. Atchison, 
T<.]>>-kHA.-Sanliil''<K. R., igSi-«Q; Secretary ortbcSocklv lor the Promo. 
lino of KnKlnKrInvKducjIlon rrom i$«; Dinrtnrof Masiuchutctts Hivh- 
V.A1 ABsncJatinn (nun i^\ AHialniilProroxor, MuoHchu'ctls Institute 
odWhnoJOKy, iSSy-Su; Aiaodiile etafatnt, if^^-ifi; Pn>teh«>r rmm igija. 
Author of Meaniremeat of the AnruLir DeDectinn or Benms Klmd at 
On>' Knd, Kaiiroad CnrTcs aiicl Kiirtiiwnrk. Tables lor EiTlhwnrli Cnm- 
piitulirin. Kuilrnsd EniHaeerlBjc nnil Kcooninica nf l.,i>nlioa, Roads and 
KiMil Bu|l<lln)t, ItiillnHid BuildiiiK with Kefercni-e f> I-:cnnni»v in Opera. 



E 



'c Professor of Topographical 



Kouduiii. '78; A. K. E.; <t, B. K. 

I^ndSurve)flr, iS;$-»;TopaBniphicalDrBUKhlB 



■i^iqlTopaBniphicalDrBUKhlBiiianiiiidT'ipnKrspher 
''^^i!L, S"J:?l"-''t»,^;'|',Sn",'„ inT^'lBraphri™ 

technolnity, i»s,-S,; Aisi.lar.t 
iSS9-v>; P.ofes.or ftnm iH^.. 



WH,IIT POHTKR, I'lI.H., M. Aul. Soc. 

Hydranlic Enginetring. 
Yale S. .S., "So; Heiitelius Sotiey. 

Special AblhI. Tenlh Ccnnus U. S., Report 
Ei: ln>trurlnr in MKthvinUics. Mu»,.chuse<l9 
iSsi-Sc; Initlructor In Civil EnKineerlnK. iSSj- 
Clvil HniiineeriaR, >S>7-9n; Associate PrurtstD 
in|f, ivjo-^; ProlMior, iStA. 

Author of Flood DiKharge from Snmll V 

lionl of\Dr.. X V™ and XvVr, Ten'h "census 

Pnu'cr. Kites on Slereotiimr and Warped Surfai 

Residence. 149 llnnthnrne Street, Maiden. 





:ei.s-hic:h O. IIokmas, E.M., Met.E., Ph.D., Asso<-iirie Pro- 
fessor of Mining and Metallurgy. 
E.M., Mel.E., Frussinn School of Mines, Clauitlhal, '77; 
Ph.D.. Ohio University, "89. 

il, iS77-i,. _ _ 

McUltuTRV, HKSsachutelts Inslilui 
of MElairiiriEv and Aisavlne, Dakota School 
nl Profnior of Mining nnd llrtBllurjtr, Mas. 



Lead Ores (li^i-flftl; MelalinrnicaL Lead EihiWts at thr Columbian Es- 
pniitlon (iBgJl.SoiiiiKxpcrimMilion Ihc l-u»ibililv of Fire Clays (iSi«>. 
frarlher feVfiJlmtnU on lh« Fn.ihilily of Firt Clays (.?«), Tfit fi(^p. 
menl of Minins and Mctailuiiiical Laboratories (ilSg^) , The Metallurgy of 
Lead and the Desi Iyer i^at Ion of Base Kulllon, etc:. 
Resldence.ACcdarATcnueJainaicn Plain. 



S E. Pope, A.M., Ass 



e Professor of General CAtM- 



tnttructor in Chemistrv. Masuchuiells Institute of TechnoloKy, 
iS;4-7<i; Prc.l«s«or of ChemfWry, Iokh Aitrkullurnl Cotlige, 1876-84: As- 
sistnnl Professor of Genenil Chcmlstrv. Matsachu setts Initllule of Tech- 
nology, 1884-95; Aswciale Profeaior from 1895. 

Residence, Rnrltland Street. Brighton. 




LK.t/E k H. HoMKR. S.U,. Associate Professor of Arckittclure, 
M. I. T., Ss. I\'. 



GEORiit: T. l>ii>i'iii.D, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Modern 
Languages. \ 

Boston L-niversily, -33. 
Postjrrai 



L, Harrard University, 1871-7, 



i3;4-S,n Lecturei 

:-k™cK;r 



Til 



> of Medieval Germany, Traiislalut o 
.. nbKhel.ilUrulurdenkin^ledesiSlahrhun 
D the OrlElnu! Home of the Indo.Kumpean Race 
tliig of Ihe NIhelung Eipiaiiied, and in f.\n Trang 



I Knics o 

lid. ItaubK 



B., C.E., Asiiilant Pro/euor of Ap- 



Jkrome Sondi 

plied Jlfeciamin. 
Universily onilinoiK, 'So. 

ln»lnictor, UnlnHity of llllnDia, iSSo-8j; Asiiil.nt Profwimr Eogi. 
ii«riiis ucl MathcmilicB, i8gi-3s: Insuuctnr In Applied Hcchanicl, 
MassachusdU InstiluK of Tccfinology, 1ES5-S9I AiiiiUnL Prafcsior of 
Applied Mech:iniu, rram 13S9. 

Author of An I nvvstlK-jlion u to How lo TeU the SlnngUi of Cements 
(with G. Lama), Experiments EtelLiting to Theory of Beimi. A Descriplion 



iNE L. Merrill. S.B., M. Am. Soc. M. E., Assislant 
Professor of MeekanUm. 
M. I. T., '81;, II. 



Hana p. Bamtlett. S.B., AffhtnnI Professor of Matkematia. 
M. I.T.. '86. VI. 

Aisislunt in Ma(hemalic>, MiiBsuchuaetts Institute of Techni.lDEv, 
1^1-S;; Instructor in M^lhrinulics.iSAS-oi ; Ataltlant Prorexnr of Miulie. 
in;ilics rrom 1^1 ; AiiiBtant in Obiervatory nf llarvuM ColleKc iS9;. 

AuUinr nrGcneril Principles of Ihs MethcHl of Lcisl Square). 



I 



iiwARr> F. Miller. S.B.. M. Am. Soc. M. K., Asiislail Pra 
ffssor of Steam Engineeriag. 
M. I. T.. -86, II. 



SocJiMi nf Mvchnnlfjl KnEinecra, the Technolngy Qimrlctlv. and other 
Enitiiwi'rinB papers, " Steam Boiler*" (with C. II. PeaGody), etc. 
Ri'iidence, Koclilund Street, Brlvhlnn. 



I 
i 

ft 



llanard L'niver-ily, '87, i. L'. 

Bdt>' School. BilkricK. 

ofcttar at .Modern Ijn. 
manic Philolnny al Har. 

at« and Sci.nlif, Normal. lllinmK. iS^i; 



Willi \M L. I'ih-kr. S.B.. Afshlunt Ptofesior of Eltcttkal 
Kuffincering. 

M. r. T., 84, III. 

At>l>1anl, Maisacliusi'iis InMitutv of Tec h no I n); v. iS.'h-SA: Initcuctor, 



.[■:l>KHkK II. Bailbv. A.H- A.m., AftsislanI Ptoftssor of 

Ilatvard I'liivcrsitj', '87; *, B. K. 

A.H„ Harvard fnivei-silv. '87; A M., Harvai-d L'nivcrsitj', '89. 

l'..,lt>«,r Iron, .SftJ. 

Itc)<<l»ice. 7J Wendell Stmt, Cambridxr. 



Fkei> L. HAR1.WKLL. S.B.. Assishiul Pro/eiiOr of General 
Chemistry. 

L'liiiersitj' of Minnesota. 'Si; M. 1. T.. ■84. W 
Aiiiilnnt In Central C 
litiniBiry, iSSo-eji; AesistanI 
nr.idmqc!. Chambl.l Slrr. 



H 



M. I. T., •84, y. 

S,B,, M. I. T., ■S4; Ph.D., Leipzig, '90. 

AssisUnt in General and Sanitan Chemistry, M»»acllu>etls In^titult 
of TechnolDifi, 1SS4-S6; InitruMor, '1SS7-SS; Wjter AnalvKI, Suie Board 
of Health, iSSSi tn&truclor in tia> Analygii, MusMchuiella InitiluU of 
Techncilogy, iSyo-iMi Assiilanl Profcsior fmm 1S04. 

Author of BeilTiE zur Kcnntniit del Ortho-dichlcr StllbcDi ( iSoD), and 
vaHous papen nJatinu M Water and Gas Analvsis In the Jaurnal nf the 
American Chemical Soviely, Engliih Anolyat, Preaeniu*' Zeilachrifl, and 
TechnDlDgy Quarlccly, " tiaa and Fuel Analysis for Englneen." 



RTHiR .\. Si>\v.ii,^.'S[.,Pii.Y>.. Asihlaal Fro/eaor a/ Organ 

C it mis try. 
M. I.T..'86, V. 
S.M., M, 1, T., '87 ; Ph.D., Leipzig, 'go. 

IiKlructor,iS90-«; A^sialani Professor from 1S9]. 

Aulhorof aDeUiileil Courtie of Qualilalive A naWais, Laboratory E 
|ieriin«nts on the Clast Reactions i>f Organic Siibila'acea, alio numeto 



, A.M., Assisiaal Pro/tssot of HiatiHg 

WilliflmBCc.llege,';'73- 

Smdenl nl the Mas.achnaett^ InatiluU of Technology. iS^, Inilrurtor 
In Physics, iSS,|-9s; Aisiilant Profeiior from 1S95. 



ARRV E. Clifford, S.B., Assis/aai Professor of Tkeorttkat 
Physics. 
M. LT.,'86, VL; e. 2. 

Assitlani in Phytica, 1SS6-SX; Inslruclor in Theoretical Phvsics, 
iSSS-ys; Assiilanl Prolewor in TheoreUcal Phynici from .Sw- 
Residence, Trinity Court, Boston. 






.irllARD W. LimiiE, Assistant Professor of Mining and 
Mrtallurgy. 
M. I. T.. '79. III. 

Aasittanl In Mining and Mebillurelcil Lxhornlorr of Ihe MniMchuiclti 
Inililuti or TcchnolouT, iSm-Si; HintnK in CnloiHdn, iSSo-Si ; Superin- 
Icndcnl of Silver MlU In Nev'du. l^i-Si: AsiilUnt in Mining and 
MctiilJurKlval I^bontnrv of the MamavhuietM Inililute of Tcchn.>li>gT. 
iSSi-S.t: llcHdChciniot f'lr .VArlh Chicuji" RolilnR Mili Campany. South 

b«ma,*i8S7:"ln«trun.Ir in Minlnjj •nd'Mt"iiu"aical 'I'.siliorworr'^of the 
Mt.-»achustllH InoIiOitc of TeclinoJogy, iSV^i A«>ialnnt Prok-Bsor ftcm 

Boidcnce, 1413 Waihinginn Stmt, BoMnn. 



■bkherkk S. W.mi.s. A.li., A.M., Pll.D,. Assistant Professor 
of Malhematics. 
Wcilevan L'niversily, +. T.. *. B. K. 

A.Il.. \Veslev.in,-8si A.M.,We8lejan,'8S; Ph.D., GOttingen. 
"94- 

A>»i-lant in Phjaics and Astronnmv ill Wc.l.'yan. iSSs-W;; Trachrr in 

>latheniiili"at"lheMaiH<.'hiiMMIn>lilut"c'af'Tcchn'<>lnEy. i!k»-«;^ 

^il (IWIinKt'o, iSiji-iHi AsaialBiil Prufi^aHir, MaiOiichiiacila fnatilulc of 

TcchnoloHy from iSjj. 

Autliorarr.'elierPscudoniinimalHachen. iS^ij; Plane and Solid Analjlic 



iK..i".HK \\x,\^^<..u. X.^.^VyuYi., Assistant Professor of Biology. 

A.I).. Johns Hopkins l*nrvprsit>, -86; Ph. I)., Johns Hopkins 



feiKT of Kiology froi 



.■||.LI.\M Z. Rii-LRY, S.B., Ph.D., Atsislaai Professor of Soci- 
ology and Ervuoinies. 
M. I,T..-9o. 1. 
S.[t..M. I. T.,-90: .\.'S\..')i. Ph.D., 'ys. Columbia. 

Univirsity K-ll.w, l.;>lumhiii CIIckc iS9'-«i: Insiruclor Ir. Etoiiomic.', 
M;>«Kachucet1» Inililiile ur-l'cclinolaKy. i^j-oj ; Asaistunt Profeaur from 



& 



Vale. '69. 

Ph.B,, '69, C.E., ■74. Ph.D.. '76; Vale. 

In Physics and French), Sheffield Scientific School, Y^le, iBrj-Si 1 Cam- 
puler and Drauehtsman, Statiitlcal Atlas of Ninth Centut, iSTt--; ; Man. 
ager and Treasurer of Ihe Amerlon Eleclrii Co.. New Britain, iSSi-Sj; 
Instrutloi In Mathematics. Mai'sachuutta InsUlute of Technology, iSSj- 
96; A»i9tant Professor from 1856. " ^ 

.\ulhar of a book on Approximate Computitioni, and of »me pipers 




George H. H artom. U.S.. Asi/.'/<inf Pro/esiar o/ Geology. 
M. I. T., -So, HI. 

Asiislanl in Drawinic, iSSo-5i; Hawaiian Government Suney, iSSi- 
8j: Asilttanl In Mineralney and Lithologv. iSSj-SS; Inslruclor in Deter. 
Pmfe'ilotof Gwl^'f^nlsie'"''""'''* ° '^"'"85'' 'SSs-giS; As.l.tant 

Author of various papers on eeologr of Missachusetls. Hawaii, Lab- 
rador, and Greenland, published in Vrocecdinis of Boiton Society of 

Sc°e'nL'.Technoi'oBy'cto"rt«ly."e'tc"' '""' "" """' " '' ' 



Artiur G. Romii.ss, S.B.. Assistant Proffssor of Highway 
Engini'rring. 
M.I.T.. -SO. I. 

neerlna.'IsS-gJ" l.Islr 
Frofeaaor from 1896. 



Roldence, High I an 




William II. \^\v:fi.ii.^n:T..'6M.. Assistant Professor of Architi 
M I. T- "91. IV. 



immer Street, Don 






Robert H, Riciiariis, S.B., Professor of MiniHg BngiitteriHg- 

and MtlaUurgi. 
M. I. T.. '68, III. 

AiBiitant in Chcm[<try, Maajichuxtti tnitltutc of Tcrhnologv, iS6S- 
69; iMIrurlar in Assavine and QuiilUaUvc Analysli, iSte-To: A>tjB»nt 
ProfEiur ar Anjiytical Chrmiilry, 1870-71; Profesior of Mineralogy ind 
Assnyinjt, tn chHrse of the Mtnlnu mA Mcullurglul LiboriWrio', 1S71- 
-,i\ ProlVssor of Mining Eiixin»rinf[. iSvj-St; Secretary of the Faculty, 
.8;S-,S.; P,of«so. of MJninK Knf.RiMr,'ng and Metallurgy from 1SS4; 
President of M, I T. Alumni A.iocialion, \%u~^\ President of (he Anicri- 
ijin ln>l>1uU of Mining Engineers, 1SS6-.S7. 

Re.idence, Jl Eliol SIreel, Jamaica Plain. 



nifMHir orbecilojiy, WcllealeT College, iSSS; President of Ihe Bo>t< 



iiLLiAM II. N1I.KS, I'll. It,, A.M., Professor of Geology amf 
Geography. 
Vak S. S., '67. 
Pil.H.. ValeS. H.. '67; .'i.M.. Weslevan, '69. 

f Phvical Gcographv, MattachuKlu Institute of Tech. 

.„r..,.-.._r,,.„,.!;...r._-j,z ranhy,Ma.sachu>e[tsln5liluK 

r, WelleslE; C 
~o("\ar"' ""'" ' '"" " '"' ' 
Author nf Aurncy of Glacirri In Ihc Eicivi 

nentii, Hiid Fraeturu of Rocks, nbtervcd at Mon 
he Recent Floodi in Germany (iSS;), etc. 
ItesEilrnce, 10 t.inden Street, CambridKe. 



il.M.KKs R. Cross. S.B.. Thayer Professor of Physics and 
Diretlor of the Rogers /.akora/ory. 
M. I. T.. -70, Sci. and Lit. Course. 

In^IrucIOT in Plivkio. MatsachulEttl Institute of Technnlogy, 1S70-71 : 
Assi«I;<nl Piofi'SDoruf Physio, iS7i'7j;PrafeMior of Physics from 1875; In 
charge ofDepartmcnlorptiniofiomiSni in charge of Course in Kkclncal 
FngVni-ering. since ill estllSlithmcIII, 1^. 

Author of man* original (clentiHc papers on electricity, acoustics, and 
other branches ol iihyalcB, chiefly published in the Proceedings of Ihe 
American Acudsmy of Art* and Sciences. 



L'niversity ol" Virginia, '70. 

Professor, 187^-75; Professor ol Thcoiclical and Applied Mech'ajiici from 

Author of Notes nn Mechanical Eneineering <iSS6), Notes on Frictinn 
(1887]. Applied Mechanics (iSSs), and of many papers in TTansactioos 
An^lcan Society Mechanical Engineers. PtocieSings Society of Arts, 
Proceedings British Iniiltution of Civil Engineers, Technoit^j Q.narlerly, 




George F. Sw.ms, S.B., M. Am. So. 
of Civil Eagineeritig. 


c, C. V.., Hayivard Pro/tuor 


M. I.T.,-77, I. 




l„.u"frL'"cl'"E''n"'B'in^;;^.'M«^ 


nonTcnthL'. S. Cennu*. 1S80-S3; 
chuscltt InsIiliiU of Technology, 



Fci-or of Civil Engii 



1, 



Dginecrina, iSSi-Sr; AssMiate 
:nginL'croTMn»ncliu«tURaii- 
™. Lom,niHH.ncti .™n .», . «.n,ner DO. 

Alllhar of Kcpnn on Water Power of Aliantie Slope, NoIm on 
Ilrdriulics iind on Ttieorv "f Slruclures, numeroui rcpotti on Railrmd 
Bridges, llrake Equipmenl. nnd cilher subjects, in Ihe repoRs of the 

•uhjeelB.^ubilshed' in lhe"Trim»i.'ctions"of'Amitic»ii Societ/civiTEn* 



, M. Am. Inst. Arch., Professor of 

. iSiM-AA; Studenl In 
Asustint H-itii ■■roieasor Ware 11 Ihe " "" ' 

„ ._>l-^..aS,; A«i...n. S„ner.i.ln^ A, 
, i970-7j; m nrtncrahip wii 

as. 

Author of A Few Hints Abo 

S91). Note* on Limes, Ceioentl, 

Ketldence, i.^j Itf »rlboro Strc 



, iS«-«; Assistant with Profeasor ' 
' ~ ' nokwy, iSiSu; Auiitant Supervlilnir Architect at Waihins. 

. . ., ..L „, ^ (. Cabot, of Boiton, 1871-iS; 

mietts Institute of Technology, trom 



VAN Daell. l.l..T>., Professor of Modern Lan- 
guages. 
B.A., Collt^e Sninl Servais (Li^ge), '64: Ph.C, Louvain, 
■6.? ; LL.D., Univergiii de Liige. '68. 

Dircrt^r'lUodcrn iMtaagta, Boston High and Lnlin Schml",'"$SiS-iSSv| 
Profcosorof Modern £ungn:igcs, M»*»ebusett> lD>tiIule of Technology, 

Buch^Iin "''ll'ulKir'Jtioii ''11™ j""scbraliamp)',' l!eander'9 Triiumereien 
(edited and annoLnted). Htine'i Har^reiae (edited and annDlaledJ, Me- 
molres du Due dr Saint Simon (edited and annotated) An Introduction to 

chrfais de Paul BourgL'i, etc 



William T. SifUCWiCK, Pit.B., Ph.D., Professor of Biology. 
Yale S. S., "77 ; BerzeliuB Society. 
Ph.B., Yale, ■77; Ph.D., Johns HopkitiB, '81. 



ell, Mass. (.Soil, The Purificulion ot 
tic Cholera (iSui). numerous Krmirls 

n:nci;'ll'andbonl[of*Mcdlcal Science,! 



Drinking Water by Sand Fil. 

. the Stale Board of HeHlth 
A Kever CauKd by Infected 
>n, various irlicles in Wood's 



E 



Davis R. Dkwkv, A.B., Ph.D., Professor of Ecomomia and 

Universilv of Vermont, '79; A, *. ; *. B. K. 

.A.B., I'niversitv of VermorU, '79; Pir.U., Johns llopkini 

University, "86. 

Teacher, Underbill, Vt,, 1S79-S1 ; Principal Hyde Park High School, 
CbicaBO, iS8i-3j; Student jnd fellow *l Johni Kopkins Univeiiilv, 1B81- 
S6; InBtnidor.Maluichinntt iDMitute of Technology. \^-S&; AiiisUnl 
Proruur, i8gS-S91 AiiwiaU P»fe>ur, 1889-91: Prafeunr from igoii 
SccretaiT American Statlatloil AModalkin from ig96; editor of Ita publl. 
catiaiH iVoin 1SS7; Appainled, I gu-oc, Chairman of Bonrd to Inveatigitc 
the Subject of the Unemployed In Maaauchuietta ; Member of Publication 



Political Hjatory .ince iSij (1SS7), Syllabua of 
EnVundi 






aF^aociated in Iteporton Unemployed, 



ILAS W. \U>l.M\\.^.\]., Professor of Physics. 
M. I. T.,'76, VIII. 

Assistant, Masucbu setts Institute of TechnologT,iE;6-3ii; Instructor, 
iSSo-Sll Aasjslani Prolcssor, 1&S1-S51 Ar,t<x\.ia Professor, iSS5-9Ji Pro 
fcswr from iSnj. 

AutbnrnrPhmiL-a] Laboratory Notes (iSSc), The EITect of Tcmner. 
nlure on the VJHrositv of Air and Carbon Dioiide r 1SS6). Dlacusaion oflhi 
PreclaloD of Meusunmenla (iSS;), Friction of Leather Bells on lion Pu|. 
l<^vs. Klandsinl for the Kcsislnnce of Copper [iSvO.and numerous olhei 



I Wkll*. S.n., Professor of Malkematks. 
T., 'IS: I- 



ofctsor. iSS^i-a,; I'rol"'™' 

t. College Alg^'br:!, 



Author of Acndemic^Arithmelic, Academic A,lEet<ra, Higher Alnbr;i, 



.d Spherical Trigon 



of Marine EngintfriHg 



ineering. Imuerial AKrlcuHuml ColleKe, Jupun, 1S7.S-S0; AssI 
sior^orM«:hanical_tngincering^Univera.ly o/__lll(nr'- --- 



.oloer. 1SS.VS4; Assistant 
— •— '>rares9or, i!~ 



Pmressor of Marine Knu ineering from i<;j. 

Author of Notes on Governors and FIv Whwia (iSSj). Notea on Valve 
Ge:ir9(iS|l;),Thcrmod;nxniicBorthe Steam EnKincandMbcr Heat Engines 
(iS!«), Tables of the Properties of Saturated Steuin (iSiS), Valve Ceara 
for Steam Knginea (■»»), Steim Boilera (>9if7) (with £. F. Miller), 
Papers to Seieutllic Societies, etc. 

Residence, Hotel Oxford. 



z 



S,B., M. I. T., '84; Ph.D.. Erlangen, ■ 

Alliltant, MuilclluietM InsUmU of Tcchn 
retaij oV the Viculty, iSSitV iiml7ram iSiii ; ! 



r CiK, i:(ber die SyJvcsuiK 



c, Minball Stml, Ncivton Ccn 



.RL« Bates. Litt.D., Professor of Englhi. 
Bowdoin, '76; A. A. *. ; *. B. K. 

Editsrof BrnadBldc, 1879^; editor nriloiton C( 
9.1 -"prafciMr "of Eng'fiXM^sMhusSil'" liislllule 



Hd Tactics.. 
West Point, '77, 2d Lieutenant. 

eiiiRcs, Wcit Point, >^-oi; Krvvd u'nJcr Gcner^iJB Cmnit and 
with Ti^iith C:ivaJrv ae»iiisl Apache Chief Geronlmo in Ariionn. 1) 
AiJiiit»nl (iviieiai (litltict Cnluinbi;i Mi1ili;i, iSSr-Sg; with Tenth C 
in Ariinn» and Montana, 1S.V94: Hrofegsor M. r.f . fruiu iS^f. 

AuthorofthePrlnciplei of Strategy. 

Residence, The C^ibleo. Babcncic Street, Rmokline. 



1. Desi'kaiielle, Professor of Arckilcciarat Defiga. 

Iteceived (irsi promolion nt (he Ecole des Beaui-Am. iSSi; many of 
the prizH »i the KckLc del Beuui.ArK and InstKui de Pixncc: rtttittd 
dijilomao from Kcole de> BcuuiArts and Society cenlralede* Archllectt 
frjnc.xiai IDiik nail in the Cnncour de Riiine l<>ur lime*, and receircd first 
Scound Grand I'rli in iWii, Ijinrial du Salon. i>IKcierd'Acnd<!mie. Assi&unt 
Inxnet-turSliUeBuIldMiBvand Nulianal Pulaco.and under this title helped 
in ttM.' baildinK of the New Mininlrv of AarlcDllure, Nulional Library, the 
mnnoion of M. Wllasn. and M. fftivj (cn.President), :md various olhfr 
pulillc and prtTiie edifices. 



I 



Pktkk SiXtw \MU,SM.,Pro/i>sor of Aheianism and Direc/oro/ 

f»e Worishofs. 
M. r. T.. '78. [{. 

(iricliiaic Sliidcnt, Muudiuiitlii ItiMilulc at TcchnnloBy. iSrlj-ni: 
DrniiKhunian, Ilxwi' Scule Co., Itullaiul, VI , iSpr^; Dr^iuirhtiinaii, 
Ilinklcv LcH-onmive Cn.. Botnn, ^faB-■iy. tiiMruclDr, MaiiMchuHctti In- 

..:..... -t ■,-..., 1 iSSjj^; An*?— -' ■>— '- «. ~. . ■-.- 




C. Frank Ai.c.kx. S.B.. M. Am. Sof. C- IC, Professor of Rall- 
roail BngiHrrring. 
M. I.T.. 72, I. 

AssJ<uni KiiRinccr, Hr.,vid>'ncr.- Wuicnvorki. i^Ti-Til AsKlslanl En- 
^in,.c..r, I'n.vidcncc SeweriiHC, iS;.l-;5i Awi.lant KiiKin«-r, NeoitDa WuWc- 
wnrk>. iS;^--;6; IWinii-r liiincclor. ItcKInn Scn-cniKE, iHtt: Asduant 
KiiKii'wr, Alchiann, Tiiprlin it Sunto K« ». K., iS^So; AuUunl En. 
Kinccr, Mriicun Ccntnil It. K., inSo: Chief RtiKlnwr, La* XrxM H'lUer. 
wnrkH, and iivncnil eniiinueriiiK, iSSo; Aiwlibint Enilnccr, AtchUon, 
Tiinvka Jb Santu Vi K. K., i!^i-H|; Si-cntgri aftbe Society Mr tbe Promn. 
t[on urKnKliieerlnji Ediic;ilinn rmm iS^; DlnnoTof Maauchnictti High- 
wuv AiiMH-iatiiin Irnm ink; AMuUnlHi^lciiwir, Uah>iirhiiMU> Invlitut* 
ortichnnJiigy, i*»7-Sir. A»sociat« PmAuor, iff^-^\ frolcMinr fnun iBij6. 

Aiilhor n( MfmunmcDt nf tlw Aneiilar Uefluctlon nf Bcimi Kind at 
Onv I'lnd. I{!iilriud Curien and Eaithwnrh, Tahle» tor KiiRliwiirk Cnm- 
iiui»iii.ii. Kuilnud BnKtnceriDj; snd KamiiiBlu ■>( l^miinii, KdihI> and 
llo.itl BuiJ.llni'. Kiiitnud HuildliiK Willi ilercrcnrc to Koiionir in Opera. 
linK. arlirlt. in linKinccriiiK it.-.:.ird, Kililroid lijzrlW, riirhnril.)!;^ 



■ 



itKi> K. IkHioN.S.H., Asaofinte Ptofff.sor of Topogriiphical 

E«gii-ftiag. 
(i«<loiii,'78; A. K. E. ; *. B. K. 

r, iS7.'U7y| Ti>pnHrapliica] Drauiftitiman mid Tnpnjpapbcr 






;y. liWj-A,; A 



1« TupnKruphicHl 



wii.iiT I'okTKR, I'lr.Ii., 

HylraHlif Engint^rin 

Vale S. S., '8oi Itci^eliu 

Special Aeent, Tenth C«ns 
%y. lt»(riirt«r in Malhcmalici 
iSSj-Sj; Inilruclor in Ciiil Ei 



Aulhor of I'iood DiBcliar^ frftm Small WBtcnhed*, Kcpnii 1 
Sanilnrv InitnHlion ol CrrlHin Tenement - 1 lnu«E [>i!ilrlct!< of nosxa 
lionsol Vol.. XVI. and XVII., Tenlh Crnsua V. S., Kep'irls on 
Pim-cr, Notes Dn SlereoliHny lind Wiirped Surfaces, etc. 

Roidencr, 149 llnivllknme Slrrrt, Muldeii. 



HEisRifH O. HoFMAX, K.M., Met.E.. Ph.D.. AuociaU Pro- 
fessor of Mining and Metallurgy. 
E.M., Mei.E.. Prussian School of Mines, Clauslhal, "77; 

Pir.D.. Ohio Vniversitj', 'S9. 

PracticinE Mctallurglit, 1S77-S51 Privalc Alsistanl la Pn>r. R. H. 
Richards, iindLecluret on Mrinllurgr, Mneaiit^huseltt Intliimc of Tech. 
noiDKv, i><Ss-S7; Hiofi-'ssor of MetairurKr ""'J AsMving, Dakola Scliool 
nf Mliici, iSS;-S>i: AssiMant PtafegsDr of Mining iind ^ctalLurgv, Maa. 
BuchusHU InalilulEofTechnoLngv.iSao-gi; Aasociale Profeisor of Min- 
ing Knd Melallurgy from Iggt. 

Author of Gold MiJlineln ihc BJack Hil1a(i33S).The DrvAlsayof 
Tin Ores (iS«>l. Kectnl Proiireas in Ihe Trealmtnl of Argentiferous 
Lead Ores (1.^1-96): Melallurgical Lead ExhibHs at the ColuRibiun Ei- 
poiltion(i89j).SoineKxprrimenuon Ihe FusfbiJilv of I'iie Clays (1S9O. 
further t7perin.ent» on the Fusibility of Fire Clhy. (i6»), Tfie fequlp- 
mint of Minine and Metallurgical Laboratories (1S96), The MclalluTsy of 
Lead and (he Dciilveri^atlon of B;ise Bullion, etc. 

Residence, (■■ Cedar Avenue, Jamaica Plain. 




iiOM.vs E. Pope, A.M.. Associate Professor of General CHtm- 

islry. 
Harvard I'niversitv. '69. 

Insiructor in Chemistry. Massachusetts Inslilule of Technology. 
lSr4-7<>; Profc»«orof Chcmiatry, Iowa Agricultural College, lS;6-S4; As. 
sistant PrnfesMnof General Chemlatri-. MasiachuieCts Institute of Tech. 
nology, .8S+-95; Aawciale Profeswr from .995. 

Residence, Korkland Street. Brighton. 



LKA/tK B. \\t\^\t.«.,'6.\i.. Associate Professor of Archili 
M. I, T.. "8^, IV. 




icoHOE T. UiPi'OLU. i'lE.U., Associate Professor of Modern 
Langaages. | 

Boston rniversilj-. '83. 

■ ersity. 1871-74; in^ructot in French; Sani- 



d Anglo-Si 



ily. .S;4.^,i; 



Liw'riturc. Gothic. and'Mlddle High German. Johns Hopkins Universily, 
1SS.1-SS: Itistructor in Modern Languages, Maasachuselts Inslilule of 



Aulh<^r of the Great Epics of Medixval Germany, l-ranalaUir of 
Emanui-1 Geibcn Brunhild, IleuUche IJttemturdenkinale des 1$ Jahrhun. 
derls. Theories as (o the Original Home of Ihe tndo.Kurope;m Race. 
Richard Wagner-s King of Ihe Nlbclung Eiplaliwd, and in part Trans- 
Inted, German ScientihcVeader. elc. 



loloKy, 1 




Y P. Talbot. S.B., Ph.D., Aiioeia/e Profeaor of Ana- 
lytical Chtmistry. 

>[. I. T., •%<., V. 

S.B., M. [. T.. 'Si;; Ph.D., rniveraily of LetpzLg, '90. 

alyliul Chcmiitiii. MuKuchuiirtu Initltutc n( Tech. 



S9S. 



■.i.HT»loff und J™lwM.er.l.iir (iSyo). Noli, an tht 
and ItvdriiuKtIc Acidi on Tiiilic and AdrIIc Ac 
he LIKnlure of AnxcUc uiidTislIc AcMt fRim iS 



Action of 

di (iS,!). 
U to ■S91, 
. Moodv) 



CJiAHi-rs K. .\. CiHRFKR, .V.H.. A.M., AfiociaU Pro/e!>or 0/ 



U,. lliirviird I'nii-ersitv, "87; 
■8S; Fellow of Harvaiil I'niv 
Pniis. 18S9-91. 

Inslruclor in llint-iry and IMIUiCal Scjl'nce, Matmchutcttl InatilulE D 
■V. iS(,i->,,i; AiOiLtiint VmS^tof of lllMnry, !*«-«; A.««ial 



EtUl.>r«fllr<><:kh 



.>f Krii 



bL 



L)r>u|chlMn»n for SiiiKrinteDdcnt of BridE.*, p. C. * S[. I 
<X:S-m; Lliiir Clirh C>r Sh.>H, P.C* si. l- K. H., iKto-Si; 
r.rWaunvnrki mill SiKnali', N. Y. A N. £. R. K., iSb-Si; Ai»ii 
fcHor, MiKinchiuHitu liMtitHle of TKhnoloKT, iV>v-i^; Aiwocial 
>or frnm i4r^-. Author of Descriplive GennKtrjr, Mechanical Dti' 



a Hd Economic fieoloj^y. 
M. l.T .'76, VII. 




Stndciil AHaiKtai 
iS;ii-jS; AsBitUni 
AHlKtanl Profni'nr 



1 Palrnntoloav, iS;;-;!.: A.iistant in Palcomol-Ky. 
:ici>lni:y, i>l;S-.So: Insiruclur in lleojoiiy, ll^&>-.'ili 
HlncraJnity und LithnloKV. iSSj-qj: Atsi»lant Pio- 
tciwr 01 siruilurjl u<id Kciiniiniic Gcolngy froin'i.S^j. 

Aiilhorof CimJni-yiif EHitcrn Hiui'iiehiileUB, GcoloKy of Itie lloilim 
ItBiln.L-aniinon Mmiiral* and lIocki.GuiiicK to MinenliiKT •"><■ >o Dynain. 
Icxl Geoloiiy and Petravrjphy, Tabic* for the Dclennliuilloiiof Cnmmnn 
Ml.icrHla, 4ind numcmna puprrB cm Ihe GroloEy of New EnKJand. iIk 
BJack llilts, Cuba, Trlnidail.ctc; and on Joinl Structure, Kaulf. UriKin 
of Continent*. Cniors of Soil*, Concnlloiu, Drift, Ore dcuosim, etc., nub- 
li>hed in Hrocccding* of Ihe Bolton iiocwtv of .Nutural Ilitlorv, Americarv 
Journal i>f Science, (;«>lo,(icjl Ma|[a/lnc, Tcchnoiogf <^aruriy, etc. 
Itesidcnce, iv P;iil< Lane. Jamaica Plain. 





a'" 


ROME SoNDERiCKER. S.B., C.E., Assistant Froftssar of Ap- 
ptild Mickanies. 
University of Illinois, '80. 


h%M 


necrlng and Mathrmukl iSSv^S; Intlructor in Aspllcd M«hanici 
MuiichuKUii InKituU of T«GnoIt>gy, iSgs-S9i Ais^UnC ProFcsior of 
Applied Mechanic.. Tron. .389. 


^ 




Author of An InvesliB^ition si to How lo T«t theSlnogth ofCmenU 
(wtth G. Lama), Hi peil menu Kelntlng toTheor}- of Beimi, A DeicripUiii) 
of Some Repeated Stress Eiperimcnu, Nolt. on Graphic StaUci, elt 


^^H 


1 


Retidence. Nekton. 




Allvne L. Merrill, S.H., M. Ain. Soc. M. E., Assistant 
.^\ Professor of Mtekanism. 

M. l.T.,'85, n. 



10 Hie 



.mbridgep 




Dana P. B.\rtlett. S.ii., Assistant Professor of Mathematics. 
M. I. T., -86. VI. 

Assielant in MalhcmUlcs, MasaachuSEtts Institute of TEchnoloar. 
1SS6-87: li»tructor In Mathcinalko, iSSS-a< ; AMlatnnt Profeiior «f Malhe- 
ntilliofrom 1S51; Awialanl in Observntory of Harvard Collegr, 18S7. 



DWAR1> V. MtLLER. S.B., M. .\m. t 

fessor of Steam EHgiueering. 
M. I. T.. '86, II. 

Asiistant, Ma-suchusetti Inotltule < 



■of Ai 



cd in the Transaction! Atn 
n«rs The Teehnolt.gyQ.iunerl_y, and 
Boilers '- (>vilh C. II. Pv^ody). etc. 
■cl. Brighton. 




Frank \'(.uel. A.B., A.M., A-ohlant Proftssor of Modern 

Ilaivoid I'niversiiy. •S^. i. L'. 

Hrorutnr of Modern t.anit>iue<», Mitchell') Royi- School, BIJleilcH, 
ia>;ichuullji, >SS7-^; lt»lmclor In Modern I.anruiKCS, MixmchusBtli 



cchnoloiry, ■J'S 
, iS%i-VJ: Din 



Summer Sihi»l ofl.ai 






iByo^j; 



i 



M. r. T.,'84. iir. 

As«isMnt, M^usaclm-vlM Tnsliluto of Tcchnoloev, i8Si-3h; Ins 
iSV>-ii): Aisisunt Profrssoi from i»ii: Member nf the Amcricar 
lulc ol Klcelrkul KiiBinenrs, .S«i; CniisuUinK Klectricnl Knglneei 
InkpL-ctlon llenartneBtnftlwKaelory Mutual Insiiriince Companie 
Memh^rofManaitlnicCnRiinilWt, A. 1. B. K., t3v6. 

Ite»ldencc, We»t Nvwtnn. 



iKiiERKK II. Bailey, A.II.. A.M., Anh/ani Proftsser of 
MatAemiilicf. 
Hartard I'niverstly, 'S7; *. B. K. 
A.li., Hjirvard fnivei-sltj-. '87 ; A M., Harvard University. '89. 

A»>»laiit in Mal> 
MnLhi'ni^tio, Ma*<j>e 
Prolesior from iSw. 




Freii L. Bardwki.1,. S.H., .■)-<«>/««( Pro/tfsor of Ge> 

I'liiversilj' of Minnesot.1, 'Si; M. 1. T., '84. V. 

Aatiiunt in General] Chemiilry, iS.V^; Initruetor in G' 
CheiniMr>'. iSSo-<h; A»i<lflnl Pn.feioor Frnni iS<h- 

Uesldenee. Chnmblel Slreel, Bo.bury. 




AvcrsTus H. Gill, S.B.. Ph.D., AlsisM^l J'ro/e.ssor if Gat 

M. I. T., ■84. y, 

S.B,, M. I, T., ■S+; PH.n., Leipzig, '90. 

of Technnioity" 1^^; Inslruclor. iSSr-SS;' W.«r'Analy8l, SUt«'Bo"ril 
of HcHllh, iS£S; Inslruclor in Unl Analyais, Man lachu Mill Inalilule of 
Technology, 1890-94; ABiiBtinl Piofriior fron. 1S94. 

Aulhor of Bt'ilrai! lur Kcnntnltt dii Onho-dlchlor StElbctu (igoo), and 
varioui pxpen rclatinK tci WbIct and Gas Analvals in lh« Journal of the 
American ChcmjqBL Society, Ennliih Anslyit, Freaeniua' ZeilKhrifl, and 
TechnnJogy <^a[letly, " Cai and Fuel Analysis for Enginecra." 






M.I, T.,'36, V. 

S.M., M. I. T., '87 ; Ph.D., Leipzig, '90. 

Instructor, 1S90-93; AiiHislant Profe^sar from 1S93. 

Aulhor of u DetniJed Course of <^a[itiilive AnaLvBi*, Laboratory E«. 
■rt>c"«ln Scientific Papers. " n u . , 

Reiid^nce, jS St. Jainti Avenue, Boston. 



WilliiiHG Col lege, '■■73. 



nPhysira, iSS,i-9s; . 



llARRV E. Clifkohd, S.B., Ass-hlant Professor of Tkeorttical 
PAyfks. 
M. I. T., '86, VI.-, e. S. 

Al.iltant In Physici, 1SS&-SS; Instructor in Theorrlical PhvsJc, 
iS'iS.^S; Assistant Professor in Theoretical Fhyaics from iSyj. 
Residence, Trinity Court, Boston, 



k 



M.I.T.,'79, UI. 

A«»Unt in Mining and MetxllurKJcul Labomtory of the Maa>achu»U> 
Inttiliilc nf TechnolMj, iStu-Si: Mining in Cnlnradn, i5Sr>-Si ; Superin. 
lendcnt of Silver Mine In Nevada, iSSi-gi; AiiiiunL In Mining and 

-8.i;Tl™dC- 



We^levan fniversitv, ♦. T., *. B. K. 

A.H., Wcslevan, ■8j;A.M..WeBle)'an/83; Ph.D., Gattingen, 



Trchnolnfty fmi 



. tSi^i-94; Awfiiatatit FrofvifflT, MaKSjt: 



il Avenue. HjdePi.rk. 



it ^^ TiiKijiH.RE IIor<;ii, A.H..I'ii.D.,^.w(s/<i«/ Pioff nor of Biology. 

• •"' •■ A.B., Johns Hojikins I'tiiversily, '86: Pii.I>.. Johns Ilopkinf 



LUM Z. Rii'i.KV. S.l!., Ph.D.. Ai^shlanl Prote>sor of Soci- 

M. I. T., '90. I. 

S.[i,.M. I. T.,'go; A.M., "(jl, Ph.D., 93, Columbia. 

GrndiiHLL' Student. Massarh unfits Inititute if Tcchnolo^T. iV-91 ; 
L-nivcr.ilY F.:ll<.*. OHunihiii OilleKi^. iA,i-i,i; Inslructor in feconomiiB, 
hu<ai» Inlliuilc uf lechnoldKy, iSyJ-uj; AssisCint Pmft.snr fron. 



^ 

A 



Yale. '69. 

Ph.B.. -69, C.E., -74, Ph.D., '76; Yale, 

Initruclnr in Enfinmini and MathemiTiu fand for part of Ihc time 
in Phjsics and French), Sheffield Scientific School Yale, 1S7J-S1; Com- 



Georoe II. ii\RTi>x,S.]i., Aasislant Pro/estore/Geolofry. 
M. I. T..80, HI. 



idor, md GrCEnland. piibiish 

atural HlMory, Amctiun Ji „. 

Jienct, Technolngy quarterlj. etc. 

Residence. 16 I^nin^n Avenue, CambtldEe. 



AmericoD GeologLiI, 




Artiu R G. RonHi\s, S.B„ Asiislant Professor of Highway 
^r.I.T.,■86, I. 



AisiM»nI in Cicil Knvlne 
eerinK. i^vS-M; Inslruc.or in 



1 



William II, L,\ivre; 
M I, T,.'9[.IV. 



1 in Technolngy qiwrterly. An Eli-menlary 



B.. AiMSlanl Professor of ArchiUc- 



a/ijihudjm 



llENHV v.. Ill KKIS..^. S.l!. 



« Mechaiikat Druiving. 



■ in Sa«il,lry Cifm. 



ClIATll.KS L, ,\l>, 



Inftriiclor la Frfrband Dran-iug. 



Pf.TKR S, III RNS, I'li.n. . 



Inslruelor in (ieneral Cktmisi 



ImtrHClor i« l,itla$trial Chemistry and Tcxiilr Coloring. 



Inslruclor in Mechanical Eugineering- 



H EUclrical MtasHrements 



tTlCAN R.<iEORtiF..jH., A.M. 

Harvard, '90; O. i. X.; *. B. K. 



/nilrnclor in Mathemati. 



[AKRV M. (ioomviN, S.B.,I'H.D Instruclorin Phvs 

M. I.T..'9o. VIII,; l'ii.D.,Universltv or Leipzig, '94, 



William Lincoln Smith, S.B. 
M. I. T., '90, VI. 

Leonard M. Passaxo, A.B. 
Johns Hopkins, '89. 

Charles H. L. N. Bernard . 
Chaptal College, Paris, '77. 



Instructor in Electrical Engineering", 
Residence, Concord. 

Instructor in Mathematics, 
Residence, 19 West Cedar Street. 

Instructor in Modern Languages, 
Residence, 214 Columbus Avenue. 



Joseph Blachstein ..... Instructor in Modern Languages, 

Realschule erster Ordnung, Hanover, *68; Institution Springer, Paris, '70. 

Residence, 691 Parker Street, Roxbury. 

Willis R. Whitney, S.B.. Ph.D. . . . Instructor in Sanitary Chemistry, 

M. I. T., '90, V. ; Ph.D., Leipzig, '96. 

Residence, 71 Pinckney Street. 



Carleton a. Read, S.B. 
M. I. T., '91, II. 

James Swan, S.B. (Absent) 
M. I. T., '91, II.; A. K. E. 

G. Russell Lincoln, S.B. 
M. I. T., '71, HI. 



Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 
Residence, 45 Saunders Street, Allston. 

Instructor in Naval Architecture. 
Instructor in Sanitary Chemistry, 



Residence, 71 Newbury Street. 



Loi'is Derr, M.A., S.B 

M.A., Amherst, '89, A. U. ; S.B., M. I. T., '92, VI. 

Residence, 83 Centre Street, Brookline. 



Instructor in Physics, 



George V. Wendell, S.B. (Absent) 
M. I. T., '92, VIII.; A. K. E. 



Instructor in Physics. 



Instructor in Modern languages. 



Leon E. Bernard 

College, Louis le Grand, Paris, '79. 

Residence, 37 Falmouth Street. 

Robert P. BuiELow, S.B., Pii.D Librarian of the Institute, 

S.B., Harvard, '87, B. B. II.; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, '92. 

Residence, 73 Pinckney Street. 



Benjamin E. Carter, Jr., A.M. 
Harvard, '90. 

Henry G. Pearson, A.B. 
Harvard, *93, O. Z. 



Instructor in Mathematics. 



Residence, 133 St. Botolph Street. 



Instructor in English. 



Residence, 86 Pinckney Street. 



25 



Itntructor im Industrial Chemistry 



Frank H. Thorp, S.B., Ph.D. 

M. I. T., '89, V. ; Ph.D., Heidelberg, '93. 

Residence, Oriole Street, West Roxbury. 



Charles K. Ki llkr, S.B. 
M. I. T., 92, II. 



Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 
Residence, W'elleslcy. 



J 



: 



'l 



William A. Johnston, S.B. . 
M. I. T.. '92, II. 

Charles F. Parke, S.H. 
M. I. T., V- II- 

John O. Si mnkk, A.B. 

llaivurd, '87. 



Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 
Residence, Behnont. 

Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

Residence, Taunton. 

Instructor in History. 
Residence, Hotel Bristol. 



William II. \\ alkkr, H.S., A.M., Ph.D. Instructor in Analytical Chemistry. 

B.S., Pennsvlvania State College, '90, B. X. E., <t>. K. 1.; A.M., Ph.D., Gottingen. 

'92. 

Residence, The Oxford. 



SAMIEL p. MlLLIKEN, S.B., PH.D. 

M. I. T., '87, V. : Ph.D., Leipzig, '90. 

Residence, Wollaston. 



Instructor in Organic Chemistry. 



GEORiiK W. Roi.i I.. A.M. ..... 

A.B.. Ilarvani. 'S5 ; .\.M., Harvard, 'S^). 

Residence, 40 Broadway, Cambridge 



Instructor in Sugar Analysis. 



Lr. Kl.MBALL Rl SSKLL. S.B. 

M. I. T., '86. \'. 



. Instructor in General Chemistrv. 



Residence, Arlington. 



Ervin Kenison. S.B., Instructor in Mechanical Draiving and Descriptive Geometry. 
M. 1. T., '93, II. 



Residence, Maiden. 



Charles L. Norton, S.B. 
M. 1. T., '93, VI. 

KiLBURN S. Sweet, S.B. 
M. I.T.,'93, I. 



Instructor in Physics. 



Residence, Manchester. 



. Instructor in Civil Engineering. 



Residence, 57 Chandler Street. 




F. Jewett Moore, A.B., Ph.D. . . Instructor in Analytical Chemistry. 

A.B., Amherst, '89, X. *. ; Ph.D., Heidelberg, '93. 

Residence, Landseer Street, West Roxbury. 

26 



\V. Felton Brown Instructor in Freehand Drawing, 

Residence, 33 Glenwood Street, Roxbury. 

Frederic H. Keyes, S.B. . . . Instructor in Mechanical Engineering, 

M. I. T., -93, II. 

Residence, Newtonville. 

Justus Eriiardt Instructor in Modern Languages, 

Residence, 56 Clarendon Street. 

Henry Fay, A.B., Ph.D. .... Instructor tn Analytical Chemistry. 

A.B., Lafayette, ^89; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, '95. 

Residence, 387 Boylston Street. 

Harry W. Gardner, S.B. Instructor in Architecture, 

M. I. T.,'94, IV. 

Residence, Endicott. 

George B. Haven, S.B Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

M. I. T., '94, II. 

Residence, 196 Walnut Avenue, Roxbury. 

Frank P. McKibben, S.B Instructor in C it' il Engineering. 

M. I. T., '94, I. 

Residence, 466 Massachusetts Avenue. 

Joseph W. Phelan, S.B. Instructor in General Chemistry, 

M. I. T., -94, V. 

Residence, li St. James Avenue. 

Alexander \V. Moseley, S.B. Instructor in Mechanical Engineering. 

M. I. T., ^91, H. 

Residence, 71 Pinckney Street. 

William J. Drisko, S.B. ....... Instructor in Physics. 

M. I. T., '95, VIII. 

Residence, 123 St. Botolph Street. 

James F. Norris, A.B., Ph.D. .... Instructor in Organic Chemistry, 

A. B., Johns Hopkins, '92; Ph.D., Johns Hopkins, '95. 

Residence, 3S7 Boylston Street. 

Samuel C. Prescott, S.B Instructor in Biology, 

M. I. T., '94, \. 

Residence, 334 Broadway, Cambridge. 

Archer T. Robinson, A.B Instructor in English, 

Harvard, '96, 4». B. K. 

Residence, 42 Pinckney Street. 

Arthur \V. Weysse, Ph.D Instructor in Zoology, 

A.B., Harvard, '91 ; A.M., Harvard, '92; Ph.D., Harvard, '94. 

Residence, 16S West Brookline Street. 

27 



Kranklin II. RoBr 
M. I. T., -94, II. 



fhiant in Mechaakal Dra-a-ing. 
it StKct, Cambridge. 



JESSK II, ItulkSK, ; 
M. I. T., ■95. II. 



hint in Mtckanical Engintering. 



Carl H. Clark. S.B. 

M. i.T,, -95, xm. 



. Assistant in Mtfhitiiifiil Enginreiing. 



Frpukkh- \V. II0.VK, H.S UshtiiHl in iitmral CkfiHistry. 

New 1laiii]isliiir Colleyi; of .\grii!iilliire ittui Mc.'li.inio .\rls, '94. i^. T. V, 



CJIARM.S R- W.M.KKH, S.B. 

M. 1. T.. \)y \. 



Assistant in Crnrral Chemistry. 
rn Avenue, C....brill>!f. 



Frank B. Masters. S It. 
M. I. T..-95,II.; 2. A. E. 



r M.;A„ni,:ii Eugin.-rring. 



Relhen E. BAKKNiirs, S.B. . 

M. I. T.. '96, I, 



ll,->iJencc, *i Morse Slrcul, N civ mi.. 
KD. S.It issis/ant in Civil E»gin,;-ri»g. 

. . Assistant in Civil Engineering. 



Edward M. RRAiiii, H.B. 
M. I. T., -96, XIII. 



Assistant in .Wecinnieul En, 



™. JJ9 Pro>pert Slrcel, Cinibridge. 



<7EORGE K. Burgess, S.B. 
M. I. T., '96, VIII. 



Assisfhnt in Physics. 



Residence, Otis Street, Newtonvillc. 



AViLLIAM D. CoOLIDGE, S.B. 

M. I. T., '96, VI. 



Assistant in Physics. 



Residence, 133 St. Botolph Street. 



Leonard H. Goodhle, S.B. 
M. I. T., -96, V. 



Assistant in Analytical Chemistry. 



Residence, Salem. 



Amadeus W. Grabau, S.B. 
M. I. T., '96, XII. 



Assistant in Geology. 



Residence, S7 Appleton Street. 



Harrison W. Haywaru, S.B. 
M. I. T., '96, X. 



• • 



Assistant in Industrial Chemistry. 



Residence, 79 Milton Avenue, Hyde Park. 



Minor S. Jameson, S.B. . 
M. I. T., '96, I. 



Assistant in Civil Eng^i nee ring: 



Residence, 35 St. James Avenue. 



Ralph R. Lawrence, S.B. 
M. I. T.,'95, VI. 



Assistant in Physics. 



Residence, 34 Summer Street, Dorchester. 



Clarence W. Perley, S.B. 
M. 1. T., '96, VII. 



• • 



Assistant in Biology. 



Residence, 35 Hamilton Street, Lynn. 



WiLLL\M L. Root, S.B. . 
M. I. T., '96, X. 



Assistant in Oil and Gas A nalvsis. 



Residence, 666 Dudley Street, Dorchester. 



Harold C. Stevens, S.B. 
* M. I. T.. 96, I. 



• • 



Assistant in Ciz'il Engineering. 



Residence, Braintree. 



Albert J. Wells, S.B. 
M. L T., '96, II. 



• • 



Assistant in Mechanical Drawing. 
Residence, 204 St. James Street, Roxbury. 



29 



Instructors anq Assistants in the 

rvjBCHfiNic Arts. 



.1 



TllKODORK H. MkRRICK 



Insiructor in Wood'vork and Fouudry-'vork. 
Rc^idenre, Arlington IIci{;ht8. 



JaMKs R. I.\.MinKTII 



• • 



Instructor itt Forging, 



Rfsi(lcnci', n*! Paul (Jorc Stri'ct, Jamaica Plain. 



RoHKKl II. SmIIII 



Instructor in Machine-tool M'ork. 

Hi«.idfiuc, 5'>7 Trcniont Strct-t. 



MiNoT A. Hkiix.iia.m 



Assistant in Woodzvork. 



Kfsidcncc, Arlinnlon Heights. 



KvF.Ki.rr II. M\sri.Ks 



• • 



Assistant in Forging. 

Ilesidenri", 1 1 Walnut -Avenut;, Roxbury. 



Ira (J. Sn DLKv 



Herm \n Hoos. 



Assistant in Machine-tool Work. 



Rcsidfnci*, Rnckl.ind. 



Instructor in (Jymnbstics. 



Residence, The (iarticld, Rutland Square 



30 



Tehchers HNt) Lecturers for the Uehr 

1596-97. 

Tri'MAN U. Bartlett, om Modelling. 

Loiis Bell, Ph.D., on the Electrical Transmission and Utilization of Power. 

George \V. Blodgett, S.B., on the Applications of Electricity to Railway Signal- 
ling. 

Henry Carmichael, Ph.D., on Electrolysis of Brine. 

William R. Copelaxd, A.B., on Bacteriology of Water and Sewage Purification. 

Howard C. Forbes, S.B., on Commercial Electrical Testing. 

John R. Freeman, S.B., on the Hydraulics of Eire Protection and on Fireproof Con- 
struction. 

HoLLis French, S.B., on Electrical Engineering Practice and Specifications. 

David A. Gregg, on Pen and Ink Drawing. 

Hammond \'. Hayes, Ph.D., on Telephone Engineering. 

Ernest F. Henderson, Ph.D., on German History. 

Henry M. Ht)WE, A.M., S. B., on Metallurgy. 

Daniel D. Jackson, S.B., on the Microscopical Examination of Water Supplies. 

Charles D. Jenkins, S.B., on Illuminating (ras, and on Pottery and Tiles. 

Simeon C Keith, Jr., S.B., on Industrial Biology. 

Ernest A. Le Sieir, S.B., on the Industrial Applications of Electro-Chemistry. 

Arthir D. Little, on Paper. 

James W. Loveland, S.B., on Manufacture of Soaps. 

Samiel W. Mead, on Architectural Design. 

Walter S. Moody, on Transformers. 

Odin B. Roberts, S.B., A.M., LL.B., on the Nature and Function of Patents for 
Inx'entions. 

Loris J. Schiller, on Sugar and Sugar Refining. 

Frank G. Stantial, S.B., on Sulphuric Acid. 

Elihu Thomson, on Recent Developments in Applied Electricity. 

Ross TiRNER, on Water Color. 

C. Howard V^\\L.KKRy on the History of Ornament. 

3> 




J<,MN I)- RrSKLK. 

Ukohi.k A- Osm.B 

JAMKSM. CrMTS. 
ROIIEKT II. KlVMM 
WiLLIVM II. N[1,KS 

Charlbs R. Ck..s. 
Gaetano I..\\/.\. 



, Prrudeat.' 






S,rr>i.. 


T- 






C.v. 


OR.; 


E T. I)n- 


i-<.Ln. 


lit 


:nry 


P. Tali' 


lOT. 


Ce 


rAKL 


ES K. A. 


ClRI 


Li 


NV.S 


Fainve- 




\Vj 


iLL[ 


AM O. Crosby 


JE, 


*OMI 


E SONDEB 


:rkkf 


Al 


LIN 


E L. Mei 


XKILL. 



WiLUAM T. Si:i«iw 




Davis K. Di-wkv. 




H.HS \V. IIOLMAN. 




Wkhster Wkixs. 








Ahlo Kates. 




John- IIiuklou, Jr. 




DKSIR£ DESHBAnEI.I 


LE. 


Pbter Schwamb. 




C. Krank Alles. 




AlFREU K. BlKTON 




DwilillT H<lRTEft. 




llEI-VKKII O. llOFM: 


\N, 


Thomas E. Poi-e. 




Elea^ser H. Homer 





"JL 


LIAM L. I'lEFER 


Fre 


DERICK II. RAILI 


Krb 


.. L. Baruweli.. 


Ati; 


isTUs n, Gll.l.. 


Art 


Hl'R A. NOYES. 


S. 1 


lOMER WoODKKIl 


Mar 


RV K. Clikkorii 


Rk.1 


lABii W, Lodge. 


Fre 


WKRICK S. Wood 


Theoi>ore MOIUH. 


WlL 


LIAM Z. RlI'LEY, 


Josi 


;i-H J. Skinner. 


Geo 


H<.B H. ItARTOX. 


Art 


Hl'R G. ROUHINS 


WIL 


LIAM II. Lawre: 



FRflNCIS ^Masa WaLKER. 



^^m fifc. [HE founder of the Walker family in America was Captain 
i^S Ml J Richard Walker, of Lynn, who was born in 1611, and 
came to this country when nineteen years of age. He was 
a member of the Honorable Artillery Company of Lon- 
don, and one of the first to join the Ancient and Honor- 
able Artillery Company when it was established in Boston. Phineas Walker, 
the descendant of Richard, in the fifth generation, served with Wolfe in 
Canada, and accompanied Ethan Allen at the assault on Ticonderoga. 
Later, he did good service along the Atlantic coast as Captain of the 
Militia Company of Woodstock, Conn. Walter Walker, the son of Cap- 
tain Phineas, moved from Connecticut and settled at North Brookfield, 
Mass., in the year 1800. The Rev. Dr. Snell, pastor of the parish from 
1 798, said of him in an anniversary sermon : " Deacon Walker was a very 
useful man in the church, as well as society. His influence was uniformly 
in support of order, peace, and religion." Amasa, the son of Walter, and 
the father of Francis Amasa Walker, was born at Woodstock, in 1799. 
He studied, with William Cullen Bryant and Judge Cheever, under the Dr. 
Snell mentioned above, but through weak health was forced to give up a 
■college career. He spent some years as a merchant in Boston, but soon 
after the birth of his son Francis Amasa, in 1840, he removed to the 
homestead at North Brookfield, to devote himself to more congenial pursuits. 
He served in both branches of the Massachusetts Legislature, and, for some 
years, as Secretary of State to the Commonwealth. In i860 he cast his 
vote as a National Elector, for Lincoln, and two years after was sent to 
• Congress. He and his brother, Freeman, were prominent in the Liberty 
party and the Free-Soil party, and active in the so-called " underground 
railway " for the assistance of escaping slaves, many of whom were shel- 
tered under his hospitable roof on their way northward. Amasa Walker 



was most distinguished, however, as an economist, and his work fell in 
much the same lines as did that of his more famous son. He was a 
lecturer on political science at Oberlin College and at Amherst, from 
which institution he received the honorary degree of LL.D. He published 
two notable books: the "Science of Wealth," which was translated into 
Italian, and (he " Nature and Uses of Money and Mixed Currency." He 
attended the peace congresses of London and Paris in 184} and in 1849, 
and was a member of the American Peace Society. His wife, Hannah 

Ambrose, was the 
daughter of a New 
Hampshire mer- 
chant, and a woman 
of great force of 
character. Her keen 
sense of honor and 
strong patriotism are 
indicated by an an- 
ecdote related by 
her son. Obtain- 
ing an unexpected 
leave of absence, af- 
ter the Peninsula 
Campaign, Major 
Walker hurried home without notifying his family. He found his mother 
seated by the window with an open Bible in her lap, gazing out to the 
southward. As her son, of whom she was dreaming, appeared suddenly 
before her, instead of a glad welcome, her first thought was for her 
country's pressing need; and the first words that sprang to her lips were, 
" You haven't left the army, have you ? " 

Francis Amasa Walker was born in Montgomery Place, Boston, July 
2, 1840. His early youth was spent in North Brookfield, where he began 
his education in the local schools, public and private. In 1850 and 1851 
he studied at the academy of the neighboring town of Leicester, and 
there finished his preparation for college. He spent another year, however, 
in the study of Latin and Greek at Lancaster Academy, and entered Am- 




herst in 1855, at the age of fifteen years. In the middle of his Sopho- 
more year he was compelled to remain out for some months, on account 
of illness, and he finally graduated with the Class of 1860, a <P. If. h. 
man, and a member of the J. A. /::. fraternity. He gained the Sweetser 
essay prize and the Hardy prize for extetnpore speaking. Of this latter a 
classmate says: " It was offered to the min who should make the greatest 
improvement in extemporaneous speaking during the Sophomore and 
Junior years. ... I remember Walker's final address well ; it was de- 
livered before the whole body of students of the college, and it was very 
fine. No extemporaneous address that 1 have heard him make since, as it 
seems to me, has equaled it in impressiveness." Another classmate writes: 
"General Walker's college career was characterized by steadiness of pur- 
pose and brilliancy of execution. In his day all of the college studies 
were * required,' but none of them were slighted by Walker. In the last 
two years of the course he displayed great fondness for economic, histori- 
cal, and philosophical pursuits, and in these he was pre-eminent. He pos- 
sessed a remarkable power of quick resting. He could turn from one 
tiresome study to another, apparently with little effort, and after a hard 
forenoon's work in three or four distinct fields, take a bit of a nap, and 
start perfectly fresh for his afternoon's duties. His energy was not satis- 
fied by mere perfunctory fulfillment of his prescribed duties; he sought 
and gained great distinction in athletics, in the rhetorical exercises of the 
*Open Societies,' in college -editorial writing, and in chess." Although the 
youngest man in his class, " his influence was greater than that of any 
one else, for he was rightly regarded as fair to all. He was believed by 
all his associates to be thoroughly honest in thought, and word, and deed, 
and his opinions on every subject were treated with respect." His love of 
freedom at this time is shown by the following motto written in his class- 
book at graduation, ** Let us ever defend in our measure of strength the 
rights of man and the excellent dignity of self-government." 

Immediately after his graduation Francis Walker began the study of 
law in the office of Messrs. Devens and Hoar, at Worcester. The senior 
member of the firm was the late Judge Charles Devens, and his partner, 
the present United States Senator from Massachusetts, Hon. George F. 
Hoar. Devens was Major of the Third Battalion of the Massachusetts 

35 



I 



Militia, and at the outbreak of the war he took his command to the front. 
In the summer he returned to recruit the Fifteenth Massachusetts Volun- 
leers, and the young student in his office, having just attained his major- 
ity, enlisted, August 1, i86l, as sergeant major of the regiment. In 
September, however, General D. N. Couch obtained Captain Walker's 
appointment as his assistant adjutant general, and the young man, thus, for 
the first time undertook the charge of this vital and exacting department 
of military life. In the spring of 1862, when the army was organized into 
army corps. General Couch took command of the First Division of the Fourth 
Corps, and March found him at Fortress Monroe, accompanied by his as- 
sistant adjutant general, ready for the advance upon Richmond. The 
■corps went through the Peninsula Campaign, and fought the battles of 
Williamsburg; and Fair Oaks in the advance, and the Seven Days' Battles, 
culminating at Malvern Hill, in the retreat. 
In the last-named engagement the First Di- 
vision was attacked incessantly for three 
hours and a half, and lost six hundred men. 
In each of these three encounters Captain 
Walkers' coolness and gallantry gained the 
special commendation of his commander. In 
one instance General Couch reports that he 
made a daring personal reconnoissance, and 
had his horse shot under him. In August the 
young officer was promoted to the rank of ma- 
jor ; and in October, when Couch was placed 
in command of the Second Corps, Major 
Walker was made his adjutant general. This 
position he held for the rest of his military ca- 
reer, under Major General W. S. Hancock and Major General G. K. Warren, 
and the comprehensive knowledge he, as a staff officer, enjoyed of all 
the operations of the army, peculiarly fitted him for the works which 
he afterwards undertook, the "History of the Second Army Corps" and 
the " Life of General Hancock." The first battle of the Second Corps 
under General Couch, was the terrible defeat of Fredericksburg. General 
Burnside, having superseded McClellan, threw his army across the Rappa- 




hannock and attacked the Confederate forces in an impregnable position. 
The Second Corps bore the very brunt of this attack. In his history 
General Walker says: ** All that the Second Corps could do was now done. 
It had obeyed its instructions to attack a strong position, thoroughly forti- 
tied, bristling with eighty guns, and held by forty thousand infantry. . . ^ 
All that had been done had been done without the slightest help from that 
inspiration which springs from the anticipation of victory. Every officer 
and every soldier in the ranks had seen and felt for himself that the 
attempt to carry the position was hopeless. Yet nearly four thousand 
men had fallen in obedience to orders." After this carnage the historian 
relates that Couch, broken-hearted at the defeat and the loss of his 
men, rode slowly down the whole line of the corps within easy pistol 
shot of the enemy, as if courting death. In this sad and dangerous 
ride he was accompanied by three companions, almost against his wilL 
General Walker states that one of these three men was " an officer of the 
staff," but does not add that he himself was that officer. General Couch 
declares that a few weeks later Major Walker had almost made up his 
mind to give up his staff position, and take command of a regiment. 
"He was almost fiercely loyal, and considered it to be his sacred duty to 
go right into the front line, and there fight with his Massachusetts com- 
rades." He was finally overruled, however, in this resolution. Later, as a 
result of the battle of Fredericksburg, Burnside was relieved, and Joseph E. 
Hooker made commander in chief. During the winter months the army lay 
quiet, and in January, Major Walker was promoted to the rank of Lieuten- 
ant Colonel. In April the troops again moved forward, and early in May 
fought the battle of Chancellorsville, only less disastrous than the former 
defeat, and almost on the same ground. Colonel Walker was seriously 
wounded early in this engagement by the bursting of a shell, which nearly 
cost him his left hand. He was forced to take a leave of absence for a 
time; but returned to the Corps in the early autumn, soon after Gettys-^ 
burg. He received later the brevets of colonel and brigadier general for 
"gallant and meritorious services at the battle of Chancellorsville, where 
he was severely wounded." This season closed with the lesser engage- 
ments of Auburn, and Bristoe Station, and Mine Run, in the two former 
of which the Second Corps acted as the rear guard of the Union army,. 

37 



and was at one time opposed single-handed to Lee's entire force. All the 
next year, 1864, the Second Corps was with Grant in the advance upon 
Richmond. It took part in ten pitched battles, and lost six thousand men 
in the Wilderness, five thousand at Spottsylvania, and three thousand at 
Cold Harbor. Colonel Walker's last engagement was at Ream's Station, 
on the twenty.fifth of August. Seeking some commander in the dark- 
ness he rode into the enemy's 
lines, and was captured. While 
being marched with other prison- 
ers along the road to Richmond 
he escaped into a swamp, and 
lay there until nightfall. He then 
made his way by the stars to the 
Appomattox River, and attempted 
to swim across to the Union 
lines. The current, however, car- 
ried the exhausted swimmer below 
the Northern pickets, and he was 
only saved from drowning by re- 
capture. He was imprisoned in 
Petersburg Jail, and then carried 
to Libby Prison, where he was 
kept for six weeks. The damp- 
ness of the prison and the lack 
of proper food broke down his 
health, and he was released upon 
parole. Later, after he had been 
exchanged, he attempted to return 
to the army, but his constitution 
had not sufliciently strengthened, and, indeed, it was some years before 
he completely recovered from the effects of his imprisonment. General 
Hancock's exclamation, " Colonel Walker is the best adjutant general that 
I ever knew!" is a tribute to the faithfulness with which the young 
officer performed his routine duties; while his coolness and gallantry are 
commended by his superiors in the report of every battle. 




In the autumn of 1865, when he was once more partially restored to 
health, General Walker accepted the position of instructor in Greek and 
Latin in Williston Seminary, at Easthampton, in the Connecticut valley, in 
the same year he was married to Exene Stoughton, of Gill, Massachusetts. 
He spent three years in the seminary, teaching and studying, but in 1868 
he left Easthampton to take up editorial work on the Springfield ^publi- 
can. The brilliant founder of the T^aily %epublica7t, " Sam Bowles," was 
editing the paper at that time, and it was said that ** if there was any 
ability in a young man, the %epublican office would develop it." Under 
this influence Walker became a " brilliant and forcible writer, especially 
versed in political economy," for he had already taken up his father's line 
of work. In January, 1869, he was appointed, at the instance of Mr. David 
A. Wells, then Special Commissioner of the Revenue, Chief of the Bureau 
of Statistics at Washington. This position General Walker held for thirteen 
months. The present Chief of the Bureau, Mr. Worthington C. Ford, says 
of him, in this connection : ** His predecessor, Alexander Del Mar, intro- 
duced the practice of printing the monthly reports of trade and navigation, 
and General Walker extended the scope of these issues, besides introducing 
many changes in the form and substance of the matter printed. ... He 
stamped his individuality upon the forms used in the Bureau, many of 
which were in use, unchanged, in 1893, when 1 assumed charge of the 
Bureau. His capacity for organization was shown in the changes he intro- 
duced, and his short experience in this office indicated his fitness for 
undertaking the much greater task of the United States Census." On the 
Ninth Census, General Walker was engaged as Superintendent during 1870 
and 1871. It was desired to make some sweeping reforms in the manner 
of taking this census, especially by the substitution of skilled enumerators 
for the marshals hitherto employed. General Garfield, then chairman of 
the Committee of the House on the Census, made an exhaustive report in 
favor of such a change, but the measure was defeated in the Senate. In 
spite, however, of the inadequate system in use. General Walker introduced 
more scientific treatment of the material, and added a new feature in the 
form of statistical maps. After the completion of this work he undertook 
the Commissionership of Indian Affairs, — a position he held from Novem- 
btVy 1871, to March, 1873. He studied the Indian question deeply, travel- 

39 



inir, it is said, five hundred miles beyond the railroads to visit some of 
the more distant tribes, and published a small volume on the subject 
two years later. The work was not satisfactory to him, however. Mr. D. 
M. Browning, the present Commissioner, says: *' He brought to the work 
of this Bureau the fine executive qualities which had distinguished his 
superintendency of the Census work. But he became Commissioner near 
the beginning of the reforms in the service which commenced with what 
was known as 'Grant's Peace Policy* for the Indians, and he found so 
much to encounter and recon- 
■HMp^ .-r struct that the work was dis- 

^^ tasteful, and he was glad to 

** resign." General Walker's views 

on this question are best indica- 
ted by a few sentences from his 
book, "The Indian Question"; 
"The United States have, without 
much order or comprehension, 
but with a vast amount of good 
will, undertaken enterprises in- 
volving considerable annual ex- 
penditures for the advancement 
of individual tribes and bands, 
but the true permanent scheme 
for the management and instruc- 
tion of the whole body of Indians 
within the control of the Gov- 
ernment is yet to be created. 
... No subject of legislation 
could be more perplexing and 
irritating ; nor can the outlay involved fail for many years to be a 
serious burden upon our industry. But the nation cannot escape its responsi- 
bility for the future of this race, soon to be thrown in entire helplessness upon 
our protection. , . . Surely we shall be clearer in our lives, and freer to meet the 
glances of our sons and grandsons, if in our generation we do justice and show 
mercy to a race which has been impoverished that we might be made rich." 




Early in 1873, a Professorship of Political Economy and History hav- 
ing been established in the Sheffield Scientific School at Yale, General Walker 
was called to the position. This chair he filled until 1881, for the first 
seven years of the time being mainly occupied with scientific pursuits, lec- 
turing, and writing. Professor Sedgwick says of this period: **When I 
entered the Sheflleld Scientific School at Yale, in 1874, Prof. Francis A. 
Walker had charge of Political Economy and History in the school, and I 
shall never forget my first sight of him, when our class filed into the old 
physics lecture room for its first lecture in Political Economy. He was 
walking quickly back and forth behind the long demonstration table, 
glancing now out of the windows, now toward the Freshmen, whom he 
was to teach. He was young, he was strong, he did not care to sit down, 
yet he was soberly and seriously in dead earnest. It was, however, 
mainly his intense vitality which seemed to distinguish him from all other 
professors, and when he began to speak, the rapid yei clear stream of his 
thought carried us all with him. It was not my privilege to have him as 
a teacher except for one course of elementary lectures; but on one occa- 
sion, when our class and the one above it got into a rush after a five 
o'clock lecture, as 1 drew breath after a vigorous personal encounter with 
one of our opponents, I saw my most intimate friend and classmate 
whirled past me as if from a catapult, and in the darkness discovered that 
Professor Walker had joined in, and was tumbling the contestants hither 
and thither in the most astonishing fashion. Naturally the news spread, 
and the rush came to an end. After my graduation I saw more of Pro- 
fessor Walker. I did a good deal of coaching in Latin (which is required 
for admission at the Yale Scientific School), and Professor Walker generally 
examined my men. In his Latin he was remarkably exact in rendering, 
keen in analysis, and brilliant in his vocabulary. Over all his work was 
that glow and intensity of feeling (doubtless the expression of superabund- 
ant vitality) which was always so characteristic of him. It was the custom 
for the graduating class to vote upon the question * Who is your most 
popular professor?' and Professor Walker, I think, never failed to carry 
off the palm. In the Sheffield School traditions of him still linger as one 
who was broad, able, incisive, executive, and intellectually powerful 
beyond almost any man of his time." But his collegiate duties did not 

41 



t 

t 



\ occupy Professor Walker's whole attention. He served on the School 

Committee of New Haven for four years, and on the Connecticut Board 
of Education for five. He was Chief of the Bureau of Awards at the 
J Exposition at Philadelphia in 1876, and State Railroad Commissioner in 

; 1879. He went to Paris in 1878 as a United States delegate to the Inter- 

; national Monetary Conference, where he upheld the same views of the 

'^ currency question which he enunciated in his book of last summer. He 

; maintained then, as later, that the world suffered severely from an 

-'m insufficient supply of sound money through the demonetization of silver. 

I, He said at the Conference, *' Suffocation, strangulation, are words hardly 

.\ too strong to express the agony of the industrial body when embraced in 

>^ the fatal coils of a contracting money supply." Besides his work at 

■i Yale, during this period Professor Walker delivered a course of lectures 

on " Money " at Johns Hopkins, and published several important works 

on economic science, — **The Statistical Atlas of the United States," "The 

\ Indian Question," *' The Wages Question," ** Money," and " Money, Trade, 

and Industry." In 1880 he left his work at New Haven, to take charge 
\ of the Tenth Census. This time a new law was passed by which 

the improved system urged by General Walker and General Garfield 
ten years before was brought into effect. The scope of the census was 

I 

immensely enlarged, and a large corps of skilled enumerators and experts 

« 

'' gathered together to conduct the special investigations. The work filled 

twenty-two volumes, and Col. Carroll D. Wright, now Superintendent of 
the Census, said of it, in the American Journal of Sociology for Novem- 
ber, 1895: **The contributions of the Tenth Census to social science 

: constitute the most colossal official contribution that had ever been made 

I 

by any government. The great variety of topics, their exhaustive treat- 
'.y ment, the large number of specialists engaged, the clearness of presenta- 

tion — everything connected with the Tenth Census — marked it as an 
epoch-making investigation. Its faults were the faults of any such great 
undertaking, but they were less than the faults of any previous census; 
and when it is understood that no other government embodies in its 
decennial account inquiries outside of the ordinary inquiries relating to 
population, the vast undertaking superintended by General Walker is more 
readily comprehended. This great work was conducted on the broad basis 

42 



laid down by him, and the results secured for him the admiration of 
statisticians in every part of the world." 

At this time, in 1881, the Corporation of the Massachusetts Institute of 
Technology were looking about them for a man to whom the future of 
the young school might be intrusted. President Runkle, who succeeded 
William Barton Rogers, in 1870, had tendered his resignation in 1878, 
worn in health by the anxieties of the position, and by the financial diffi- 
culties of the Institution. Professor Rogers consented to resume the Presi- 
dency, though in feeble physical condition, until a suitable successor could 
be found; and in June of 1880 he wrote as follows to General Walker, 
then still engaged upon the labors of the Census: — 

*'Dear Professor Walker: Since my conversation with you in 
Washington, some weeks since, 1 have conferred with members of the 
Corporation of the Institute of Technology on the subject of choosing a 
President for the Institute, and 1 have been authorized, in concert with the 
Committee on the School, to offer the presidency to the person whom we 
may consider to be best fitted, by scholarly training, zeal, and administrative 
ability, to carry forward the educational plans of the Institute. 

" I now write with the authority of the * Committee on the School ' to 
offer the position to you, and I need not say, my dear Professor, how 
earnestly 1 desire that you will accept it. 

Yours faithfully, 

William B. Rogers." 

After a short hesitation General Walker made up his mind to under- 
take the task, and after the completion of his work in Washington he 
resigned the professorship he still held at Yale, and on Nov. l, 1881, 
assumed the office of President of the Institute. Professor Rogers, in 
introducing to the Society of Arts its new presiding officer, said : " In 
making this introduction, personally, of President Francis A. Walker, I 
must say I do so in the fullest confidence, not only in his capacity for 
carrying out the hopes and purposes of this school, but of the hearty sym- 
pathy and earnest regard which he entertains for its past history, and for 
its future development. I trust in him as I would trust in myself were I 
of his years, and had I his experience in administrative work; and in say- 
ing this I say all that any man can say in reference to his successor. I 
commend him to you, knowing what are his sympathies, and what are 

43 



his capacities of usefulness ; and I commend you to him, knowing you for 
these many years as my friends, personally, and as the friends of (his 
Institute of Technology." The history of President Walker's life, from this 
time on, is the history of Technology. Professor Runkle said that " He 
raised the Institution from a struggling technical school to a great scientitic 
university. That was always his idea, — to keep it from lieing narrow, like 
many schools of this sort ; " and althoiigh President Walker minimized the 
influence of his own work, 
declaring only last autumn 
that " no institution in the 
world was ever developed so 
strictly according to the gen- 
eral ideas and the specific 
plans upon which it 
was tirst conceived and laid 
out," in consequence of "the 
astounding prescience and 
grasp of principles which 
characterized the founder 
and tirst President of the 
Institute, Dr. Rogers," yet, 
nevertheless, his own influ- 
ence was very powerful in 
broadening the scope of the 
curriculum, and making it 
what it is to-day. In his 
first report as President, special attention is directed to the department of 
General Studies, as " a preparation for active life, liberalizing- in its ten- 
dencies, but without any influence to alienate the student from the ideas, 
tastes, and habits which are appropriate to practical business pursuits," At 
this time, in iSSI.all the eight courses of instruction, the three hundred and two 
students and the thirty-seven members of the instructing statT, were crowded 
into the Rogers Building and a one-story brick annex on the site of the present 
Walker Building. But the next three years were to be the most momentous 
in the history of the school. In 1882 the Walker Building was erected, and 




the Chemical, Physical, Architectural, and English departments were moved 
into it. The department of Electrical Engineering, destined to become the larg- 
est in the Institute, was also created in this year as an offshoot of the Course 
in Physics. In 188) the Garrison Street shops were built, and the depart- 
ment of Applied Mechanics, which before was confined to a single small 
room, and the laboratory of Steam Engineering, which " found its space 
only in the dark hallway of the basement of the Rogers Building," were 
there expanded. Great progress was made in the Chemical department, 
the work of four years, by systematization, being fitted into three, and more 
advanced subjects introduced. Extensive changes were also made in the 
'* Natural History," now the Biological, Course, which President Walker was 
specially anxious to make a good preparation for the study of medicine. 
In 1884 the rolls showed a total of five hundred and seventy-nine students 
and fifty-seven members of the instructing staff, in both cases about 
double the enrollment at the beginning of President Walker's term. Course 
VI. was already second in the number of students. The large drawing 
room in Rogers was fitted up in this year and the Mining laboratory ex- 
tensively altered, so that three times as many students could be accommo- 
dated as before. Entrance examinations were held now for the first time 
outside of Boston, in Chicago, Cincinnati, St. Louis, San Francisco, and 
Washington. In 1885 President Walker took a short leave of absence 
abroad, and visited the Universities of Cambridge, Edinburgh, Glasgow, 
and St. Andrews, and the principal technical schools in France and Eng- 
land. On his return he wrote, ''I saw no laboratories, whether of Chem- 
istry, of Physics, or of Mechanics, which are equal to our own in capacity 
or appointments." In 1886 the curriculum of the fourth year in the 
department of Civil Engineering was reorganized, providing for the three 
options as they at present exist. In 1887 the investigation of the water 
supply of Massachusetts by Dr. Drown and his staff was undertaken. A 
bequest of a hundred thousand dollars from Richard Perkins, and the 
grant of a similar amount by the State, made the financial burden of the 
Institute much lighter. In 1888 another grant of a hundred thousand 
dollars was made, and the number of students was increased by almost a 
hundred, rising to eight hundred and twenty-seven. The course in Chem- 
ical Engineering was founded, and an important change made in the 

45 



)- 



Biolc^ical department, by which the inslruction in Natural History was 
given within the walls of the Institute, and not, as before, under the 
direclion of the Natural History Society. In 1889, the debt on the 
Walker Building having been paid, the Engineering Building was erected, 
and the branches of Civil and Mechanical Engineering moved thither from 
the overcrowded Rogers Building. The course in Sanitary Engineering was 
instituted at this lime. In 1890 the benefits of the new building were 

manifest in the de- 
partments of Mining 
and Literature, the 
former spreading 
over the whole 
lower floor of Rog- 
ers, and the latter 
being improved by 
the titling up of the 
present reading 
room. The courses 
in English were 
somewhat nioditied 
under the influ- 
ence of Professor 
Carpenter, and the 
system of co-operation l-«tween the various departments in teaching English 
composition, which has lately Iven extended, was introduced. The course 
in Geology was created in this year, and the treatment of the subject of 
Highway Engineering improved and broadened. In 1891 the number of 
students passed the one thousand mark ; the department of English, His- 
tory, and Political Science was greatly strengthened, and a Naval option in 
the Architectural course made prominent. In 1892 still another new 
building was constructed, and devoted to the department of Architecture, 
the removal of which from Ihe Walker Building allowed the Physical 
laboratories to expand. The Emery testing machine was obtained during 
the second term. In 1891 the land adjoining the Engineering and Archi- 
tectural Buildings, between Oarendon Street and the railroad, was pur- 




chased. A large exhibit was sent from the Institute to the World's Fair, 
of whose Massachusetts Board of Managers, President Walker was Chair- 
man. The option in Naval Architecture was organized into a Course. 
In this year, too, President Walker delivered a course of lectures at 
Harvard on ** Land and Its Rent." In 1894 the number of students at 
the Institute had risen to eleven hundred and eighty-four. The need of 
money, however, became more and more pressing. The grant of the 
State in 1895 of twenty-five thousand dollars a year for six years was, 
therefore, extremely grateful, in I896 President Walker delivered a 
course of lectures on ** Bimetallism," at Harvard ; and in the spring the 
Technology Club was founded, and the plans for a new building were 
drawn up. it was while busily engaged in obtaining funds for the erection 
of this, the fifth building, made necessary under his administration by 
the quadrupling of the size of the school, that President Walker's career 
was cut short. He died from the effects of an apoplectic stroke in the early 
morning of Jan. 5, 1897. 

During his life in Boston, President Walker took such a share in public 
affairs that the Evening Transcript could truly say that his death made 
*'a void in more places and wider circles of influence than would be left 
by the passing away of any other citizen of Boston." He did important 
work as a member of the Massachusetts Board of Education from 1882 to 
1890, and of the Boston School Committee from 1885 to 1888. The 
following letter, written in 1884, shows his strong sense of duty in this 
matter: — 

"Rev. Dr. Edw. E. Hale, D. Webster King, Esq., Lyman Mason, Esq., 
and others. Committee. 

Gentlemen: I have the honor to be in receipt of your communica- 
tion of the 8th inst. I do not covet any addition to my present duties; 
but the schools of the City and of the State have the first claim upon my 
time and strength, and if it were necessary for me to unload in any and 
every other direction in order to undertake a responsibility with which my 
fellow-citizens chose to entrust me regarding the public schools, 1 should 
not hesitate to do so, whatever else had to be thrown over. 1 am, 
therefore, wholly at your service. Faithfully yours, 

Francis A. Walker." 
47 



General Walker's influence on the public schools was exerted principally 
in two directions. First, he believed strongly in making normal schools more 
strictly professional, and in emphasizing the necessity of industrial training, 
kindergarten work, cooking, sewing, etc., in the public schools. In speak- 
ing of Industrial Education in 1887, he claimed that it (I) directs and 
strengthens the executive faculty or constructive passion; (2) atTords greater 
opportunity for fresh, original, spontaneous work; (i) removes snobbishness 
of feeling, dislike, and contempt of manual labor; (4) improves the industrial 
quality of citizens; (5) maintains a 
sense of social decency, and con- 
tributes to a desire to have things 
neat, agreeable, and decent. Sec- 
ondly, General Walker, while on the 
School Committee, effected a great 
reduction in the lime devoted to 
arithmetic. He disbelieved in the 
use of arithmetical problems as a 
mental training, and wished to re- 
strict them to those necessary to 
give facility and accuracy in ordi- 
nary work. In consequence, the time 
devoted to arithmetic was greatly 
cut down, and other studies intro- 
duced. "Home lessons" in arithme- 
tic were entirely dropped. President 
Walker also acted, from 1884 to 
1890, as Chairman of the Massa- 
uKivERsiiT. iri'iggj. chuselts Topogpaphlcal Survey Com- 

mission, which examined and ac- 
cepted the work of the United States Geological Survey in the construc- 
tion of the first topographical map of the State. Of the Park Commis- 
sion of the City of Boston, he became a member in 1890. During his 
connection with this Board the number of parks and public pleasure 
grounds increased from six to nineteen, while the present magnificent sys- 
tem of parkways and boulevards, ten miles in length, was created. Seven 




48 



million dollars were spent on the work during this time. Mr. George F. 
Clark, the Secretary of the Department of Parks, says, "General Walker 
took an intense interest in the work of the department, where his keen 
insight and clear judgment made his services invaluable to the city." 
General Walker became a member of the Art Commission of Boston at 
the same time, in 1890, and a Trustee of the Public Library in 1896. 
He was President of the American Statistical Association from 1882, and 
always made it a point to be present at its meetings, sometimes at great 
personal inconvenience. He was an honorary member of the Royal Statis- 
tical Society of London, Vice President of the National Academy of 
Sciences, a member of the Massachusetts Historical Society and of the Inter- 
national Statistical Institute, President of the American Economic Associa- 
tion, honorary member of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, 
Senator of the Phi Beta Kappa, Correspondent of the Central Statistical 
Commission of Belgium, corresponding member of the California Academy 
of Sciences, an officer of the French Legion of Honor, President of the 
Military Historical Society of Massachusetts, honorary member of the 
Literary and Philosophical Society of Manchester, Vice President of the 
American Society for the Promotion of Profit Sharing, Vice President of 
the Society* of Naval Architects and Marine Engineers, a Correspondent of 
the Institute of France, and a corresponding member of the British Asso- 
ciation for the Advancement of Science. He received the degree of A.M. 
from Amherst and Yale, of Ph.D. from Amherst and Halle, and of LL.D. 
from Yale, Amherst, Harvard, Columbia, St. Andrews, Dublin, and 
Edinburgh. 

As an economist there were three principal lines of thought with which 
President Walker was identified,— the question of Wages and the Distribu- 
tion of Wealth, the subject of Money, and the problem of Economic Re- 
form. His name is perhaps most frequently mentioned as one of the chief 
opponents of the Wage Fund Theory, according to which wages were paid 
to labor out of a pre -determined mass of capital, and were therefore un- 
affected by the efficiency of the laborer. President Walker maintained, on 
the other hand, that " under perfect competition, the laborer would become 
the residual claimant upon the product of industry, the amount to be 
deducted on account of rent, interest, and business profits being subject to 

49 



definite principles, and, consequently, all gains in productive power would^ 
upon this condition, inure directly to the benefit of the lalxirer." General 
Walker first attacked the almost universally aaepted doctrine of the Wage 
Fund in a lecture at Amherst, in 1874, and expanded his views in the O^orih 
t/lmericaii l^eview for January of the succeeding year. His theory has, in 
its general principles, largely supplanted the older one. With regard to 
General Walker's position on the Social Problems of the day. Dr. Dewey 
wrote in the 1{eview of 'Reviews for February of the current year : " Mr. 
Walker had little patience 
with short-cut or mechani- 
cal schemes of social re- 
form ; and yet his sympathy 
for the uplifting of the op- 
pressed was great. He 
recognized the benefit of 
trade unions at a time when 
sympathy was rare on the 
part of the educated. His 
sympathy, too, was more 
than a passing and indiffer- 
ent feeling. In a magazine 
article published soirte years 
ago he remarks : ' 1 believe 
I was the first person oc- 
cupying a chair of Political 
Economy to declare that 
sympathy with the working 
class on the part of the gen- 
eral community may, when industrial conditions are favorable, become 
a truly economic force in determining a higher rate of wages; but by 
sympathy I certainly did not mean slobber.' He believed in the efficacy 
of free competition, but when he said competition he meant a real com- 
petition at every point. It was to be "severe, searching, and unremit- 
ting,' for the workman must be able 'to withstand and return the pres- 
sure. What is wanted is the largest capability of resistance and reaction/ 




50 



Any measure, therefore, which would aid workmen to be more * alert, act- 
ive, and aggressive in presenting their economic interests' he favored. 
Hence he advocated a restriction of immigration, believed in a gradual 
reduction of hours of labor, opposed trusts. . . . There were three things 
which aroused President Walker to sharp speech: shallow philosophy, a 
suggestion of non-fulfillment of obligations, or confiscation, and any attack 
upon law and order." His relation to monetary science was an important 
one. He framed a definition of ** money " which was adopted by the 
"Encyclopaedia Britannica," and insisted that irredeemable bank paper, of 
whose inexpediency he had the deepest conviction, should, nevertheless, be 
included under that term. He introduced the expression "common denom- 
inator in exchange," as a substitute for the phrase, " measure of value," 
and followed his father in opposing the " banking school," which held that 
a body of money composed of bank-notes and coin behaves precisely like a 
body of coin alone. General Walker is, perhaps, best known, however, 
as a bimetallist. His position on this question has always been clear, and 
consistent. From his speech in the Paris Conference of 1878, for the 
whole of his career he held that the demonetization of silver was a 
cruel wrong. " Commerce and manufactures needed a common world's par 
of exchange. Monometallism was responsible for the friction cutting deep 
into the vitals of a beneficent world competition." He never appealed to 
national interests or class prejudices, but held that for all alike a contract- 
ing money medium was a serious evil. But with regard to methods he 
was most conservative. Although he believed the Acts of 1878 and I890 
to be the " outcome of genuine enthusiasm, in the main disinterested, in 
the main loyal," he considered them undiplomatic, injudicious, and practi- 
ally mischievous. In the stormy campaign of last summer he preserved 
the same marvelous poise, and stood out as one of the very few men 
in the country who did not sacrifice their intellectual integrity or 
their moderation to the exigencies of the contest. His influence with the 
coming administration would surely have been a great one. During his 
connection with the Institute of Technology, President Walker published, 
besides his historical works, the " History of the Second Army Corps," the 
** Life of Gen. W. S. Hancock," and " The Making of the Nation ; " four 
important works on economic science : " Political Economy," " Land and 

51 



Its Rent," " First Lessons in Political Economy/' and " International Bimet- 
allism." His speeches and pamphlets on various scientific and historical 
subjects were innumerable, and he delivered a course of lectures on the 
^* United States as Seen in the Census," before the Lowell Institute in 
1882, and a single lecture on the ** Battle of Gettysburg" in 1886. Gen- 
eral Walker's literary style was always remarkable ; in argument he was 
singularly clear and convincing, and his perorations were often superb. 
His reputation as a scientific man was even greater abroad than in this 
country, and with the French economists he was peculiarly in touch. Pro- 
fessor Dewey remembers his surprise, as well as satisfaction, when some 
five years ago, in making a visit to Oxford, he attended the examinations 
of the undergraduates in Political Economy. It was at Commemoration 
time in June, and upon finding that these examinations were going on, he 
obtained permission to attend. On entering the room he found three 
examiners seated behind a long table, and students one by. one being 
orally examined, each for a space of some fifteen minutes. The text-book 
in which they were being examined was President Walker's Political 
Economy. 

But it was not President Walker the economist, or General Walker 
the soldier, or Professor Walker the statistician, whom the students of the 
Institute of Technology knew and loved, and whom they greeted with 
cheers whenever he appeared upon the platform of Huntington Hall. It 
was his strong and perfect character that exercised such a magnetic 
power over alt of us who came under his influence. We heard his 
too-rare lectures, — enhanced by no oratorical arts of delivery, but in them- 
selves fervid and direct, rounding to majestic periods. We caught the con- 
tagion of his tireless energy and love for honest work. We, as young 
men, were touched by his enthusiasm, his vigor, his marvelous dash and 
fire. We felt the genial influence of his courtesy, shown with the same 
indescribable grace to every one with whom he came in contact ; for Gen- 
eral Walker knew no distinctions of rank and class. We wondered at the 
modesty which made him speak always of the attitude of the Institute 
toward himself as something undeserved, incomprehensible. None of us 
ever came from a five -minute conversation with him without feeling more 
hopeful, more full of courage and resolve, for his optimism, his strong 

52 



confidence, his faith in human nature. It may be, when the fruits of 
Francis Amasa Walker's labors in the many fields in which he was pre- 
eminent are gathered in, that the ideal and inspiration he furnished to 
thousands of young men will not prove the smallest portion of the 

harvest. 

C.-E. A. w. 




53 



The (^LassEs. 



THE FRESH-MAN. 

^Why am I glad to be a maiit 
A real-lvt tru-ly college man? 
Because they let me have a gun» 
And chem-i-cals and lots of fun: 
That's why I like to be a man^ 
A col-lege man. 



THE JUNIOR. 

IHiy am I fond of M. L T.? 
Because of aU it means to me; 
Many an honor, many a ptizCf 
To win me favor in her eyes, 
'Whose smile brings happiness to me 
At M. L T. 



THE SOPHOMORE. 

Why do I like the Institute? 
Why, sure, you must be easy fruit. 
Wot t'elly I like to smoke and drink. 
And at the pretty girls to wink. 
That's why I like — you big galoot — 
The Institute. 



THE SENIOR. 

Why do I love Technology? 

And bear each daily task with glee? 

Because when some two months are done 

I hope to compass piles of mun ; 

A good investment thou wilt be. 

Technology. 



55 












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(?LaSS (?OLORS SNt) yELLS. 



(^LflSS OF '97. 

COLORS: Orange and Black. 

YELL. 

TcchI Rahl Rahl 
Tech I Boom I Bah I 
Ninety-seven I Ninety-seven I 
Rah! Rah! Rah! 



(^LflSS OF '95. 

COLORS: Blue and Gray. 

YELL. 

Ninety-eight! Ninety-eight! Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! 
Ninety-eight! Ninety-<ight ! Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! 

Hoo-rah ! Hoo-rah ! 
M.LT.! Ninet>-eight ! 

Rah! Rah! Rah! 



(^LflSS OF '99. 

COLORS: Bltse and Gold. 

YELL. 

Technology ! Ninety-nine ! 

Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! Rah! 

Ninety-nine ! 

(?Lfl55 OF 1900. 

COLORS: Crimson and Black. 

YELL. 

Boom^ Rah ! Boom, Rah ! 

Boom, Rah ! Ree ! 

Nineteen Hundred ! M. L T. ! 



76 



(^REER- Letter Proternitibs 



AT THE 
^IflSSflCHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY 

IN THE 

Orber of their Establishment. 



78 



giGMa (?HI. 



CHAPTER ROLL. 



^855. 

1857. 
[858. 

1859- 

1859- 
[859. 

[863. 

1863. 

1864. 

[866. 

[866. 

[867. 

1869. 

[871 

[872. 

[874. 

[874. 

[876. 

[882. 

[882. 

[882, 

[882. 

[883. 

1883. 

(883. 

[8S4. 

[884. 

[886. 

[886. 

[886. 

[886. 

[888. 

[889. 

[889. 

[890. 

[892. 

[892. 

[893. 

[893. 
L893. 

[893. 
[S94. 
L894. 
[894. 
[895. 
[896. 
[896. 
[896. 
[897. 



Gamma. 

Eta. 

Lambda. 

Xi. 

Omicron. 

Psi. 

Alpha Chi. 

Theta. 

Kappa. 

Zeta. 

Rho. 

Mu. 

Omega. 

Chi. 

Sigma Sigma. 

(iamma Gamma. 

Delta Delta. 

Zeta Zeta. 

Zeta Psi. 

Alpha Gamma. 

Alpha Zeta. 

Alpha Theta. 

Alpha Epsilon. 

Alpha Iota. 

Alpha Lambda. 

Alpha Xi. 

Alpha Nu. 

Alpha Omicron. 

Alpha Pi. 

Alpha Beta. 

Alhpa Rho. 

Alpha Sigma. 

Alpha Tail. 

Alpha Upsilon. 

Alpha Phi. 

Alpha Psi. 

Alpha Omega. 

Eta Eta. 

Alpha. 

Alpha Alpha. 

Kappa Kappa. 

Lambda Lambda. 

Xu Xu. 

F^psilon. 

Mil Mu. 

1 ail. 

Phi Phi. 

Xi Xi. 



Ohio Wesleyan University 
University of* Mississippi 
Indiana University 
De Pauw University . 
Dickinson College 
University of V'irginia 
Pennsylvania College 
Gettysburg College 
Bucknell University 
Washington and Lee University 
Butler University 
Denison University 
Xorthwestern University 
Hanover College 
Hampden-Sydney College . 
Randolph-Macon College . 
Purdue University 
Center College 
University of Cincinnati 
Ohio State University 
Beloit College 

Mass. Institute of Technology 
University of Xebraska 
Illinois Wesleyan University 
Wisconsin State University 
University of Kansas . 
University of Texas 
Tulane University 
Albion College 
University of California 
Lehigh University 
University of Minnesota 
University of Xorth Carolina 
University of Southern California 
Cornell University 
V'anderbilt University 
Leland Stanford, Jr., University 
Dartmouth College 
Miami University 
Hobart College 
University of Illinois . 
Kentucky State College 
Columbia College 
Columbian University 
West Virginia University 
Roanoke College 
University of Pennsylvania 
Missouri State l^niversitv 
University of Chicago 



Delaware, Ohio. 
Oxford, Miss. 
Bloomington, 111. 
Greencastle, Ind. 
Carlisle, Pa. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
Gettysburg, Pa. 
Gettysburg, Pa. 
Lewisburg, Pa. 
Lexington, V'a. 
Irvington, Ind. 
Granville, Ohio. 
Evanston, 111. 
Hanover, Ind. 
Hampden-Sydney ,Va. 
Ashland, Va. 
Lafayette, Ind. 
Danville, Ky. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Beloit, Wis. 
Boston, Mass. 
Lincoln, Neb. 
Bloomington, 111. 
Madison, Wis. 
Lawrence, Kan. 
Austin, Texas. , 

Xew Orleans, La. 
Albion, Mich. 
Berkeley, Cal. 
Bethlehem, Pa. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Chapel Hill, X. C. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
Xashville, Tenn. 
Menlo Park. Cal. 
Hanover, X. H. 
Oxford, Ohio, 
(ieneva, X. Y. 
Champaign, 111. 
Lexington, Kv. 
Xew York City, X. Y. 
Washington, D. C. 
Morgan town, W. Va. 
Salem, Va. 
Philadelphia, Pa. 
Columbia. Mo. 
Chicago, 111. 



79 



glGMa (^HI. 



ALPHA THETA CHAPTER. 

EstaUished March 22, (882. 



MEMBERS. 



Drkson (4j kkn Brown. 
Steimikn Pearson Brown. 
William Rawson Collier. 
William Barlow Dwuinr. 
FiNLAY Forbes Fer(;i son. 
William Henry Fox. 
Albert Webster (iray. 
James Thomas Haraiian, Jr. 
Barton Haselton. 
Lewis Andrews 1 1 ay den. 
William Abbott Hazard. 



Edward Ri dolimi Heissler. 
Robert Grant Holabird. 
Harry Birlekjii Hi nt. 

(il Y MA(iEE, Jr. 

Charles Bodwell Paine. 
John Shelley Pechin. 
James Francis Sick man. 
Licirs SivMLDiNG Tyler. 
Frank Albert Werner. 
Ernest Woody att. 
Walter (tcstave Zimmermann. 



Prater in Collegio. 
Arthur Albert Johnson. 



Fratres in Urbe. 



Herbert Tyler Bardwell. 
John Andrew Curtin. 
William Worcester Cutler. 
John Ashley Highlands. 



Charles Eastman Lockwood. 
Rhodes GreExNe Lockwood. 
Charles Latham Nutter. 
Farley Osgood. 



Frank Livermore Pierce. 



80 



n 



I L.I . 



AM * 
TILI 



THETa Xl. 



CHAPTER ROLL. 

A. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Trov, N. Y. 

B. Yale College New Haven, Conn. 

r. Stevens Institute of Technology Iloboken, N. J. 

A. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Boston, Mass. 



8i 



THEia Xi. 



DELTA CHAPTER, 



MEMBERS. 



IIknry Kimherly Haikock. 

JoSElMI I^ANl ROFT. 

(iRORCiE MdWIN I5eRG STROM. 

AlHKRT LAWRKNtlC Clll Rt IIMAN. 

Franklin Whitney Doliher. 

ArTIII R LlITLE H A.MILTON. 

Richard Stanley IIowland. 



Kdwari) Johnson, Jr. 
Timothy W'RKiiiT Hoxie. 
William Abbot Kinsman. 
Ralph Rollins Rimery. 
Pedro Sanchez y Uatista. 
Kdwin Ri thven Sheak. 
Kdward Stitevant. 



82 



f T f< I • ■ . 1 • 

1 . > 



1 ' I . I 



A«iTC. 

1 II.' 



L • A.C" X >'• 






DELia pSL 



CHAPTER ROLL. 

A. Columbia College New York City. 

A. University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia, Pa. 

E. Trinity College Hartford, Conn. 

A. Williams College Williamstown, Mass. 

♦. University of Mississippi ....... Oxford, Miss. 

T. University of Virginia Charlottesville, Va. 

2. Sheffield Scientific School New Haven, Conn. 

T. Massachusetts Institute of Technology Boston, Mass. 



83 



1 



DELTa psi. 



TAU CHAPTER. 



MEMBERS. 



Henry Walter Ai,lkn. 

Wilfred Bancroft. 

Edward Pierrkpont Heckwith. 

John Stearns Hlkkcker. 

Robert Frazier.Jr. 

Bertram William Batciieldkr (ireene. 

John Parker Ilsley.Jr. 

Samuel Fosdick Jonks. 

Henry (»rant Morse, Jr. 



Walter Page. 

William Thornton Parker, Jr. 

Ralph Plimh. 

Edward Bridge Richardson. 

(tEORge Avery Robinson. 

Albert Loring Swasey. 

Lewis Stewart. 

Roland Williams Stebbins. 

George Stanton Tiffany. 



8^ 



\ .. ■■' 



■• s 



J - 



L 1_> 1 



.. . Y 



I 



»«7^>M, I NV •' '? 



; 'ILO* »: » • 




(?HI pHI. 



CHAPTER ROLL. 



A. I'niversitv orVirgini.i 

B. Massachusetts Institute of Technoloffv 
r. Einorv College .... 
A. Rutgers College .... 
E. Hanipden-Svdney College 
Z. Franklin and Marshall College 
H. University of Georgia 
e. Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute . 
I. Ohio State University 
\. University of California . 
M. Stevens Institute of Technology 
X. University of Texas 
H. Cornell I'niversity .... 

0. Shcfticld Scientific School, Yale College 
n. Vandcrbilt University 
P. Lafayette College .... 

1. WotTord College .... 
T. College of South Carolina 
*. Amherst College .... 
^. Lehigh University .... 



Charlottesville, Va. 
Boston, Mas8. 
Oxford, Ga. 
New Brunswick, N. J. 
Hampden -Sydney, Va» 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Athens, Ga. 
Troy, N. Y. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Berkeley, Cal. 
lloboken, N. J. 
Austin, Tex. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 
New Haven, Conn. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
Kaston, Pa. 
Spartanburg, S. C. 
Columbia, S. C. 
Am he ret, Mass. 
South Bethlehem, Pa. 



8s 



(?HI pHI. 



BETA CHAPTER. 



MEMBERS. 

William Harvf.y Harlow. Aelxander Rieman IIolliday 

William Daniels Blackmkr. Carleton Spayth Koch. 

Charles Calvin HRiti(;s. Frederic Ickes Merrick. 

GEORCiE WiNsLow Hrown. Riciiard Mommers. 

William Cirrv. Howard Agnew Noble. 

Samuel Bass Klhert. George Otto Sciineller. 

William Aleck Faxon. Carl Schuttler. 

RissELL Hknry (iLover. Henry Welles Tibbs. 

John Mitciikll Higgins. (teorge Frederick I'lmer. 

Herbert Ivory Lord. 



86 






■P'-4 




TKE Nr/.V V..'RK } 

■-'iBi.IC LIM<aRY1 



*- 1 



NOV AND 



DELia lt{u??n J^PsiLON. 



Phi. 

Theta. 

Xi. 

^igma. 

<jamma. 

Psi. 

Upsilon. 

Chi. 

Beta. 

Eta. 

Kappa. 

Lambda. 

Pi. 

Iota. 

Alpha Alpha. 

O micron. 

Epsilon. 

Rho. 

Tau. 

Mu. 

Nu. 

Beta Phi. 

Phi Chi. 

Psi Phi. 

Gamma Phi. 

Psi Omega. 

Beta Chi. 

Delta Chi. 

Delta Delta. • 

Phi (jamma. 

Gamma Beta. 

Theta Zeta. 

Alpha Chi. 

Phi Epsilon. 

i>igma Tau. 



CHAPTER ROLL. 

Yale University 1844 

Bowdoin College 1844 

Colby l^niversity 1845 

Amherst College 1846 

Vanderbilt University 1847 

University of Alabama 1847 

Brown University 1850 

University of Mississippi 1850 

University of North Carolina 1851 

University of Virginia 1852 

Miami University 1852 

Kenyon College •. 1852 

Dartmouth College 1853 

Central University of Kentucky 1854 

Middlebury College 1854 

University of Michigan 1855 

Williams College 1855 

Lafayette College 1855 

Hamilton College 1856 

Colgate University 1856 

College of the City of New York 1856 

University of Rochester ........ 1856 

Rutgers College 1861 

De Pauw Universitv 1866 

Wesleyan University 1867 

Rensselaer Polytechnic 1867 

Adelbert College 1868 

Cornell I'niversity ......... 1870 

Chicago University 1870 

Syracuse University ......... 1871 

Columbia College 1874 

University of California . 1876 

Trinity College 1879 

University of Minnesota 1889 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 1S90 



87 



Delts }{n??n I^psilon. 



SIGMA TAU CHAPTER. 



Fratres in Facultate. 



Francis Amasa Walkkr.* 



Alfrki) Edgar IU'rton. 



MEMBERS. 



Kknnktii Mallox Hlakk. 

(iF.()R(.K Bl RMIAM. 
WlLMAM HkN'RY ClTI.KR. 
HoWKIJ, I'lSHKR. 

Stam.ky (»ay IIydk KiTc'ii. 

(»K<)R(iK McMlRTRIK (ioDLKY. 
OSWAIJ) CoNSTANTIN 1IkRIN(;. 

IIknry Ford IIoit. 
Waltkr Hi mimirkys 

II\RRY CRKKillTON IN(J\M,S. 
Am. AN WlNtUKSTKR lAfKSON. 



AlHKRT VoLTAlRK MoLLER. 
WoRTIIINGTON PaI.MKR. 

William Chapman Potter. 
Loiis Jerome Richards. 

AR(iYLE E<i<iLESTON RoHINSOX. 

William Otis Sawtelle. 
IIavex Sawyer. 
William Henry Tew. 
Macrice de Kay Tiiompsox, Jr.. 

TlHRLOW WasIIHL'RN. 

David La Forest Win(j. 



Prater in Collegio. 

James Swktt Smyser. 



Fratres in Urbe. 



Frederick Ciiamhers Blanciiard. 
Harry Pi mimirey Coddincjton. 

ArTIHR (jEOR(iE Far WELL. 

William Stuart Forhes. 
Gayle Tilton Foriu'sh. 



Artiicr Edwin Fowle. 
Isaac Hrewster IIazelton. 

ClIARLKS (ilLMAX IIyDE. 

Leonard Metcalf. 

Harry Orlando Marcy, Jr. 



Ralph Spelman Whitinij. 



88 



T1;K Ni'.V Y KK 

PUB lie Lii-!K''. -"Y 



'II r.i ». • • • •■ . ■ 



PHJ gBTa ^PSIiON. 



Fomuted J890. 



Local at TKCHNoLocy. 



89 



pHI gEia ^PSILON. 



MEMBERS. 



Gk()R(;K RlTllKRFORI) ANTHt)NY. 

IIerijkrt Vm,e Hkkrs. 

ROBKRT SkKI-FY I)K CjOLYKR. 

Irenkk 1)1 Pont. 
Frank Warrkn F^vkrett. 
Malcolm Failkner Kwen. 
Frederick Cromwell Field. 
George Isaac Fiske. 
Frederic William Filler. 
CjEorge Artiiir Filler. 

Df ReLLE (iAOE. 

David KDciERxoN (jray. 
Edward IIosmkr Hammond. 



Sheldon Leavitt Howard. 
Benjamin Hird. 
Harry George Johnson. 
Frederick Cleland Lindsley. 
Harry Borden Newhall. 
Thomas Pendleton Robinson. 
Ralph Edmind Sawyer. 
Gerald Basil Street. 
Thomas Eddy Tallmadge. 
Edward Molinevx Taylor. 
Charles Albert Watrois. 
William Eaton West. 
Raymond Smith Willis. 



Fratres in Urbe* 



Charles Wilson Aiken. 
\a^:l Ames, y\. 
Stephen Bow en. 
Henry Anthony Fiske. 

Sl'MNER HaTHERLY FosTER. 

Andrew Daniel Filler. 
Edward Haley Hi xley. 
Frank William Lovejoy. 



Raymond Beach Price. 

(Jeorcje W'hitefield Fay Reed. 

(lEORGE Frederick Shepard. 

GEORCiE W'lL.MARTII ShERMAN. 

Albert Hibbard Spahr. 

W^^LTER Ml LLIKEN StEARNS. 

John Gifford Thompson. 
Charles Nelson Wrightingtox. 



90 




%'*^< 



< ■ I 



Delts Qpsilon. 



Fouflded at Williams CotUgtf )834. 



CHAPTER ROLL. 

[834. Williams Williamstown, Mass. 

[838. Union SchenectJidy, N. Y. 

[847. Hamilton Clinton, N. Y. 

[847. Amherst Amherst, Mass. 

1847. Adell)ert Cleveland, Ohio. 

[852. Colbv Waterville, Me. 

1852. Rochester Rochester, N. Y. 

[856. Middlebury Middlebmy, Vt. 

1857. Bowdoin ......... Brunswick, Me. 

1858. Rutgers . New Brunswick, N. J. 

:86o. Brown Providence, R. I. 

[865. Colgate Hamilton, N. Y. 

1865. New York New York City. 

[869. Cornell Ithaca, N. Y. 

[870. Marietta Marietta, Ohio. 

'^73* Syracuse ......... Syracuse, N. Y. 

[876. Michigan ......... Ann Arbor, Mich. 

1880. Northwestern ........ Evanston, 111. 

tS8o. Harvard Cambridge, Mass. 

[885. Wisconsin ........ Madison, Wis. 

[885. Lafayette Kaston, Pa. 

1885. Columbia New York City. 

1885. Lehigh South Bethlehem, Pa. 

[886. Tufts W'est Somerville, Mass. 

[S87. De Pauw Greencastle, Ind. 

[888. Pennsylvania Philadelphia, Pa. 

[890. Minnesota . Minneapolis, Minn. 

[891. Technology ........ Boston, Mass. 

1894. Swathmore . Swathmore, Pa. 

[895. California Berkeley, Cal. 

1895. Leland Stanford, Jr. Palo Alto, Cal. 



91 



DELia QPSILON. 



TECHNOLOGY CHAPTER. 



Frater in Facultate. 



Frank \'< Ki kl. 



MEMBERS. 



IIiNTKY Ward Davis. 
Alfrki) Kimball Downks. 
William Wish Eaton. 
William Baldwln Iloit;!!. 
Kthan Hknrv Howard. 
Hassktt Jonks, Jr. 

SlLLIVAN W'lLIJAMS JoNKS. 
rRKDKRK NkLSON Lk BaRON. 



Miles Staxdisii Rkilmond. 

(iRANVILLE S.MITII. 

Jacob Stoxe,Jr. 
WiLLiA.M Randolph Strickland. 
(jKoR<iE Richards Tovvnsend. 
(JEORGE Reed Wadsworth. 
Robert Brice Wallace. 
Ward Wellington Ward. 



TiK^MAs Rote Wey.moith. 



Fratres in Urbe. 



JOSHIA AtWOOD, 3d. 

Loiis Derr. 

Albert Lincoln Kendall. 

Willis Taylor Knovvlton. 

MaIRKE Le ]5oS(^lET. 



Walter Elbridge Piper. 
Thomas Gleason Richards. 
Frank Cimmings Shepard. 
Alfred Ball Texnev. 
Alfred Edward Zapf. 



92 



. I ■- 'I '■ "■ 



giGMa ^LPea I^psilon. 

Founded in t%56f at Alabama State University^ Ttfscaloosat Alabama* 



Beta Upsilon. 

Iota Tau. 

Gamma. 

Delta. 

Alpha. 

Mu. 

Sigma Phi. 

Omega. 

Sigma Phi. 

Alpha Zeta. 

Zeta. 



Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Mass. 

Conn. 

N. Y. 

N. Y. 

Penn. 

Penn. 

Penn. 

Penn. 

Va. O micron. 

Va. Sigma. 

N. C. Xi. 

N. C. Theta. 

S. C. Delta. 

S. C. Phi. 

S. C. Gamma. 

Ga. Beta. 

Ga. Psi. 

Ga. Epsilon. 

Ga. Phi. 

Mich. Iota Beta. 

Mich. Alpha. 

Ohio Sigma. 

Ohio Delta. 

Ohio Epsilon. 

Ohio Theta. 

Ind. Alpha. 

Ind. Beta. 

III. Psi Omega. 

Ky. Kappa. 

Ky. Iota. 

Tenn. Zeta. 

Tenn. Lambda. 

Tenn. Nu. 

Tenn. Kappa. 

Tenn. Omega. 

Tenn. Eta. 

Ala. Mu. 

Ala. Iota. 

Ala. Alpha Mu. 

Miss. Gamma. 

Iowa Sigma. 

Mo. Alpha. 

Mo. Beta. 

Neb. Lambda Pi. 

Ark. Alpha Upsilon. 

Tex. Rho. 

Col. Chi. 

Col. Zeta. 

Cal. Alpha. 

Cal. Beta. 



CHAPTER ROLL. 

Boston University .... 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Harvard University . 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute 

Trinity College . 

Columbia University 

St. Stephen's College 

Allegheny College 

Dickinson College 

Pennsylvania State College 

Bucknell University . 

University of Virginia 

Washington and Lee University 

Universitv of North Carolina 

Davidson College 

South Carolina College 

Furman University . 

W'offord College 

I'niversity of Georgia 

Mercer University 

Emory College . 

Georgia School of Technology 

University of Michigan 

Adrian College . 

Mt. Union College . 

Ohio Wesley an University 

Universitv of Cincinnati . 

Ohio State Universitv 

Franklin College 

Perdue University 

Northwestern University . 

Central University 

Bethel College . 

Southwestern Presbyterian Universitv 

Cumberland University 

Vanderbilt University 

University of Tennessee . 

University of the South . 

Southwestern Baptist University 

University of Alabama 

Southern University . 

Alabama Polytechnic Institute 

I'niversity of Mississippi . 

Simpson College 

University of Missouri 

Washington University 

Universitv of Nebraska 

University of Arkansas 

University of Texas . 

University of Colorado 

Denver I. niversity 

Leland Stanford, Jr., University 

University of California . 



Boston, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Cambridge, Mass. 
Worcester, Mass. 
Hartford, Conn. 
New York, N. Y. 
Annandale, N. Y. 
M^dville, Pa. 
CaVlisle, Pa. 
State College, Pa. 
Lewisbury, Pa. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
Lexington, Va. 
Chapel Hill, N. C. 
Davidson, N. C. 
Columbia, S. C. 
Greenville, S. C. 
Spartanburg, S. C. 
Athens, Ga. 
Macon, Ga. 
Oxford, Ga. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Adrian, Mich. 
Alliance, Ohio. 
Delaware, Ohio. 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 
Columbus, Ohio. 
Franklin, Ind. 
Lafayette, Ind. 
Evansville, 111. 
Richmond, Ky. 
Russellville, Ky. 
Clarksville, Tenn. 
Lebanon, Tenn. 
Nashville, Tenn. 
Knoxville, Tenn. 
Sewanee, Tenn. 
Jackson, Tenn. 
Tuscaloosa, Ala. 
Greenboro, Ala. 
Auburn, Ala. 
Oxford, Miss. 
Indianola, Iowa. 
Columbia, Mo. 
St. Louis, Mo. 
Lincoln, Neb. 
Fayetteville, Ark. 
Austin, Tex. 
Boulder, Col. 
Denver, Col. 
Palo Alto, Cal. 
Berkeley, Cal. 



93 



giGMa ^LPHa ^PSILOiM. 



MASSACHUSETTS IOTA TAU CHAPTER* 



MEMBERS. 



William Risskll Allkn. 
Jonathan Hartlkv Brknnemann. 
Cardklla Drakk Brown. 
Howard IIknrv Bi rdkk. 
Walter Mnicios Bisii. 
Luzerne Simeon Cowles. 
Howard Browninc; Collins. 
Charles Spknc er Crane. 
Chester Francis 1)r\ke. 
John Wali.is Fleet. 



Charles Mi ssev Fosdick. 
Klmer Loiis Gerber. 
Alexander Gilchrist Hawes, Tr, 
John Hastings Hovvland. 

HARRINCiTON MaCK. 

Carl Leon Morgan. 
Charles Edward Morton. 
Charles Franklin Smith. 
William Deerino Staples. 
James Alexander Stetson. 



Charles Herbert Sweetser. 



Fratres in Urbe. 



Albert Rkhard Beddall. 
Wallace Clark Brackett. 
Howard Chase Bick minster. 
Herbert Nathan Dawes. 
William Nathan Crosby. 
Ri'ssELL Samiel BrCHER. 



Frank Bird Masters. 
Richard Henry Parker. Jr. 
Walter Robert Phemeister. 
John De Loss I'nderwood. 
WiNSLow Abbott Wilson. 
Herman Hormel. 



94 




: 1. 

t 



DEbTS T^U DELTa. 

Founded at Bethany G>Ueget Jantsary I, I860* 





TI. 


B. 


A. 


B. 


E. 


B. 


e. 


B. 


I. 


B. 


^. 




0. 


B. 


r. 


B. 


H. 


B. 


K. 


B. 


ri. 


B. 


p. 


B. 


T. 


B. 


T. 




B. 




A. 




E. 




z. 




I. 




K. 




M. 




X. 


B. 


A. 


B. 


B. 


B. 


Z. 


B. 


^. 


B. 


4). 




A. 




r. 




p. 


p 


V 

T. 




Y. 


B. 


A. 


B. 


M. 


B. 


X. 


B. 


0. 



CHAPTER ROLL, 
Division of the South. 



Vanderbilt University 
University of Mississippi 
University of Georgia 
Emory College 
University of the South 
U n i ve rs i ty of V i rgi n ia 
Tulane University 



Nashville, Tenn. 
Oxford, Miss. 
Athens, Ga. 
Oxford, Ga. 
Sewanee, Tenn. 
Charlottesville, Va. 
New Orleans, La. 



Division of the West* 
Universitv of Iowa ...... 

University of Wisconsin * 

University of Minnesota ..... 
University of Colorado ..... 

Northwestern University 

Leland Stanford, Jr., University 

Universitv of Nebraska ..... 

University of Illinois ..... 

Division of the North« 

Ohio University 

University of Michigan ..... 
Albion College ...... 

Adelbert College 

Michigan Agricultural College 

Hillsdale College ...... 

Ohio VVeslevan Universitv .... 

Kenyon College ...... 

Indiana University ...... 

De Pauw University ..... 

Sutler University ...... 

Wabash College 

Ohio State Universitv ..... 



Division of the East. 

Allegheny College . 

W\ishington and Jefferson College 

Stevens Institute of Technoloi'v 

Williams College 

Franklin and Marshall College 

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute 

Lehigh University . 

Tufts College . " . 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology 

Cornell Universitv .... 



Iowa City, Iowa. 
Madison, Wis. 
Minneapolis, Minn. 
Boulder, Col. 
Evanston, 111. 
Palo Alto, Cal. 
Lincoln, Neb. 
Champaign, 111. 

Athens, Ohio. 
Ann Arbor, Mich. 
Albion, Mich. 
Cleveland, Ohio. 
Ag'l College, Mich. 
Hillsdale, Mich. 
Delaware, Ohio. 
Gambien, Ohio. 
Bloomington, Ind. 
Greencastle, Ind. 
Indianapolis, Ind. 
Crawfordsville, Ind. 
Columbus, Ohio. 

Meadville, Pa. 
Washington, Pa. 
Hoboken, N. J. 
Williamstown, Mass. 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Troy, N. Y. 
S. Bethlehem, Pa. 
College Hill, Mass. 
Boston, Mass. 
Ithaca, N. Y. 



95 



Delts Tau Deltq 



BETA NU CHAPTER. 



MEMBERS. 



William Jackson AN(irs. 
Francis Mi not Blake. 

William Dkwky Hradlky. 

Donald Ciiknkry Campbkll. 

IIerhkrt William Ciiamhkrlin. 

PiiiLir Hknson Cooi'KR. 

Alfred Starr Hamilton. 



Edward Lowtiikr Holmes. 
AiMiisTi's Clark La.mb. 

Clifford Milton Leonard. 

Thomas Nesmith, Jr. 

Marshall Francis Oliver. 

Jesse Wyman Shu.man. 

MoNTFoRT Hill Smith. 



96 



• • ■ ' !_■ ^- 



1 



»S 



1 : 




ALPHA DELTA PHL 

Warrkn Day Bhiiwx Amhersl. 

David Demohest CassiI)¥ Harvard. 

AcHiv MiMCiv Chase Amherst. 

Emwin IEawley lir-wiTT Iniversitv of Minnesota. 

Gerald Martin- Riiiimond Amhersl. 

Edwin Ciiai-lin Witiikrhv Amherat, 

ALPHA TAU OMEGA. 
Frask Ravmiinu Mi\NHi Cnivernity of Pennsylvania. 

BETA THETA PL 

Frederr-k Delaxo Bi-FfiM Amherst. 

Wen-deli. Wvsf. Chase Maine State College. 

M<jKftis KiN.NARii Tri-mbill Beloit Collcgc. 

KAPPA ALPHA. 
GF.i>B(iE Owens Haskeli. University of South Carolina. 

PHI GAMMA DELTA. 
William Simnbk Barti)S Dana Worcester Polv technical Institute. 

ZETA PSL 
llARRV Howard IIammx Bowiloin College. 

pa upsiLON. 

Thomas IIallv Risskll Lehigh University. 

Asa Waters Griisvenor . Amherst, 

Geurc-e UANKOR-rii Hi-NTiNOTo.N- Iniversity of Rochester. 



SfrwRf 





"So mans men, so mans min&s," 
Cbese clubmen ace of Olvecse hinfie; 

Sea 0000 wbo baunt wbeie waters (7) roll, 
frencbmen an& S>utcb wbo give tbe "epiels," 
Cccliete wbo boast of bavlng "wbeele," 
Snb outlaws fatt, wbo Drain tbe bowl. 

So mans cluba, botb flceat anO small. 
Can (urnlsb offices to all 

Mbo love to be bltib coctt-alocum ; 
£ut one bard problem comes to eacb, 
Ane mailm cvers club can teacb,— 

It's beastls barb to oet a quorum. 



771680 



IjaMMER nut) Tongs. 



OFFICERS. 

President. 
John Parker Ilslky, Jr. 
Vice President. 
Kdwari) Stirtkvant. 

Treasurer. 
Lewis Andrews Hayden. 



Secretary. 
Sami'el Fosdk'K Jones. 



RoiiERT Anderson. 
Wilfred Hancroi-t. 
Joseph Hamroft. 
Thomas Ham.y Hissell. 
Charles Walter IJradlee. 
Franklin Whitney Doliher. 
Charles Ewin<;. 
William Henry Fox. 
Brooks Froth iN(iH am. 
Asa Waters (Jrosvenor. 
Lewis Andrews Hayden. 

Geor(je 



MEMBERS* 

Richard Stanley Howland. 
Benjamin Htrd. 
John Parker Ilsley, Jr. 
Edward Johnson. Jr. 
Samuel Fosdick Jones. 
George Herbert McCarthy. 
John Shelley Pechin. 
William Edward Pitnam. 
Edward Bridoe Richardson. 
Carl Sciuttler. 
Edward Stcrtevant. 
Frederick Ulmer. 



lOO 



■ !. |.^ • • • • v; V 

niH.'i: LIBRARY 



A6TOR, LtNOX AND 
TILOEN FOUNOATIONt 



DEIiTa glGMH. 




Samvkl S. Sadtlbr. 

Conrad Hbnhv Young. 

Norm AH Paul Rood. 
Robert Joi 

Frank E. Guptil. 

Carl Lbon Morgan. 



Aiiiav tpijT nai KnAtpiv £i>u 
a KitrpiJIjec, Tprit jijiMHiiu 

Koi jrvpyia i'pi}T, fp "a^nri'f." — Sfiiynxoniua. 



Ks P- 



Fotsnded in ^885. 



Vice President. 
RTHUR Ira Franklin. 



OFFICERS. 

President. 

ROBKRT GkoRGK HaLL. 



Secretary. 
Ralph Albert Bowex. 



Treasurer. 
WiLLL\M Alkck Faxon. 



Librarian. 
John Newton Goddard. 



MEMBERS. 
Qass of '97. 



Ralph Albert Howkn. 
John Boyd. 

Carroll Adams Capen. 
William Aleck Faxon. 



Arthur Ira Franklln. 
Robert George Hall. 
William Gilbert Hill, Jr. 
Albert Perlev Norris. 



Edward Harold Woodworth. 

Cass of '98. 
Arthur Alpiionzo Blanchard. Areli Hull Jacoby. 

Howard Brownin(. Collins. Carleton Spayth Koch. 

Daniel Wilbkrt Kih.krlv. Herbert Ivory Lord. 

John Newton (joddard. Lewis Jerome Seidensticker. 

William White. 



DwiGHT Farnum. 



Class of '99. 

Clifford Melville Swan 
Frank Robinson Swift. 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



Samuel Cabot. 
Henry Carmichael. 
Thomas NL Drown. 
Thomas Kvans. 
Henry Fay. 
Augustus H. (iiLL. 
Heinriuh O. Hokman. 
G. Russell Lincoln. 



Richard W. Lodge. 
F. Jewett Moore. 
Samuel P. Mulliken. 
James F. Norris. 
Arthur A. Noyes. 
Henry Paul Talbot. 
Robert H. Richards. 
William H. Walker. 



I02 



j f I I I? . . i I.I ' ; 



1 ■ 



Ttl '. 







CkUf 


Medkine Ma 


Lewis Ste 


HART. Ralph Pli> 




Chitfs DaugkUr. 


Ci[. 


RLES Calvin- Bri(;<;s. 




Council of Tar. 


Walter E 


MONO Rabbeth. 


Geo 


oE Stanton Tiffanv. 




llENRv Welles Tub 




BRAVES. 




CU«d -99. 


Henrv K. 


4BERLV BaHCOCK. 


Edwin Pa 


K BlRDllK. 


Tames Ernest Cmilds, 



Camekon Greenleaf. 
ELL Hall. 
Ahthir Little Hamilton. 
EnwARu HosMHR Hammonu. 
Alexander Rieman Hollidav. 
Timothy WRiiiiiT IIoxie, 
William Abhott Kinsman. 
EiOENE he Mitkiewicz, Jr. 
1[£NRV Grant Morse. 
William Stark Newell. 
Gbrari> Riotte. 
Georiie .\very Robinson. 
Pedro Sanl-hej! Y. Batista. 
Roland Williams Stebkins. 
Henry KiNiismHY Terry, Jr. 
: Weeks. 

Clwof 190a 
.Es Calvin Briuus, Jr. 
:l Bass Elbert. 
AM William Bat<ji(eli>er ( 

MlTlHELL HlOIilNS. 

i-AN Williams Jo.\es. 



i;e Stanton Tiffa: 
Y Welles Tubus. 
DORE Calvin Tvik 



The gHERwooD (?lub. 



OFFICERS. 



Little John. 
Alexander Rieman IIolliday. 



Robin flood. 
Roland Willlx.ms Stebbins. 

Friar Tuck. 
Robert Grant IIolabird. 



OUTLAWS. 



Robert (jrant IIolabird. 
Alexandkr Rikman H<>lliday. 



Henry (irant Morse, Jr. 
Thomas Pendleton Robinson 



Class of '98. 



James Samon Harbkr. 
John Stearns Hleecker. 
William Brewster. 
Pall Cliieord. 

FiNLAY FoRBKs FeRoIsoN. 

Howell Fisiikr. 
George Mi Mirtrie G<H)LEy. 
Samuel Fosdkk Jones. 
Carleton Sf'aytii Koni. 

BrY( E .MeTC ALF. 



ruiiard mommers. 
Kdward Bridge Richardson. 
William Attmore Robinson, Jr. 
Ernest Frank Riss. 
William Henry Tew. 
Mairke de Kay Thompson. 
George Frederick Ul.mer. 
Richard Benedict Van Horne. 
Walter Chatncey Watroi's. 
Charles-Edward Amory Winslow. 



Class of '99. 



William Maia<»lm Corse. 
William Cirry. 
Robert Frazier, Jr. 
Russell CJilimn. 
Edward Hosmer Hammond. 
Alexander Rieman Holliday 
Arthur Littlk Hamilton. 
Robert Grant Holabird. 



Timothy Wright Hoxie. 
George Otis Jackson. 
Henry Grant Morse, Jr. 
Charles Snead McDonald. 
William Stark Newell. 
Thomas Pendleton Robinson 
Cveor(;e Ayery Robinson. 
Roland Williams Stebbins. 



Merle Weeks. 



104 



■■■■'. 



— » 



President. 
TiiuHLow Washj 



Sterelary and Treasurtr. 

William Eaton West. 



Hbnrv Ktmberlv Babcock, 
George Edwin Behgstrom. 
Howard Lawrence Bodwell. 
Lou:s Breer. 
Clarence Clapp Brown. 
David Demohest Cassidv.Jr. 
1r&n£e du Pont. 
William Henrv Fox. 
William Howard Fulton. 
Arthur Little Hauilton. 
William Lowder Hearne. 

William 



Walter Hibbard Hinman. 
Stanley Agar Hooker, 
William Adamson Marshall. 
Isaac Osgood. 
George Otto Sciinellbr. 
Kenneth Seaver 
Edwin Ruthven Shear. 
Miles Standish Sh err ill. 
Charles Jbrnbgan Skinner. 
Hervby Judson Skinner. 
TiiuRLOw Washburn 
Eaton West. 



The (?LEOFaN. 



OFFICERS. 

Floki.NvH a. \V<x»|>. 
I V' <' /Vr •/>/////. Serrftarv. 

MaHKI. lofKK-l. KdNA M. ClIAXnLER. 

Treasurer. 
Matilda A. Fr\">»f.r. 

MEMBERS. 

|{KKTfl\ L. 15 M.r.AN I N NK. Cl.ARA E. HaM. 

Jank II. IJakii.kti. Anna C IIkks. 

Marv a. Hoi. \m>. Cora S. IIopwood. 

IIaKKN.'I I. I>I ( K. (jRACE LaNOFORD. 

Marion L. C\I)K. Harriet F. L<kke. 

Ki)N\ M. Cii \ni*i.kk. Lilly Miller. 

Mahkl I). C'l.M'r. Harrietts N. NoYEN. 

Caiii akim: J. C"ooLii>(,K. Ida A. Ryan. 

Jank Ci ilkk. Mary B. Strong. 

Mak(.\ui-:i I^. DoDi). .Mary Sti rtevant 

IlKNRIKirA DoZIKR. MaRY ]. THOMSON. 

Clara I. Diroin. Sisannah I'siier. 

Ktiikl F. Fifield. Eleanor F. Whiting. 

Mahkl Forrest. Nettie M. Willey. 

Ma'Hld\ a. Fkaskr. Alice \'. Wilson. 

Harriet T. (jai.h p. Florence A. Wood. 

Frances ZiRNciiKBEL. 



106 







E..VVA«,.J,„ISM.S,J, 



ACTIVE MEMBERS. 



roSI.IOK J.>KES. 
N WlLLlVMS JOVES. 
IIBRHEHT McCARTH 

K Api'letos Packar 

; Paok. 

ii TiloKSTOs Parked 



.i:n lit' I 



HONORARY MEMBERS. 



Mr. II 
Mk. ]I 
Mr. J. 



ARRV S. Gil 
AHRV Howa: 
P. Lorn. 



I 





Afimire rfii Couseil if Atlmiiiistr. 



Lawr 


EM-E 


Ai)]>h, 


■KS, 




Leo.s- 


All/ 


LXl). 






Edwa 


RD S; 


VMIEL 


CiJA 


I'IN. 


John 


Ahtii 


IR Co 


'LLINi 


SJK. 


Ge«r< 


V,Y. Tl 


[1 RST< 


IN C< 




Ches- 


rER 1 


RANll^ 


^ Dr, 


\KE. 


Lest. 


■H 1)1 


H\\\> 


(iARI 


)N-EH 


ClfAK 


LliS N 


:klw,\ 


[lASKTNS 


Bknj* 


iMlN 1 


IIa/el 


TI.VE, 


Jx- 


C*RI. 


St.. I 

LKV .\ 


T Ifl.. 
Ll.AR 1 






ARTE! 


IR Tl 


l[<)MAS 


llr>1' 


KINS. 


El>WA 


nn J<; 


IHNSU> 


^ Jr. 




C.TAR 


LF.S '1 


'ILESTI 


IS Li 


(EOS. 


Charles K 


ImVARI 


> L.1I 


11). 



William Lokiu 



1 Rollins Rimei 



IJavii) La Vm 



Der Deutsche Verein. 



Prdsident. 
Waltkr G. Zimmermann. '98. 



Vice. Priisideni. 

P^DWARIJ R. HkISSLKR, '97. 



Scka tzmeiste r. 
Y. W. Keisker, '97. 



Sekretar. 
A. D. Spiess, *97. 



Vollziclitsngt Gmiimttee* 

W. G. Zimmermann, '98. 
v.. R. Heissler, '97. 
A. 1). Si'iKss, '97. 

F. A. Werner, '99. 

G. C. WiNsLow, Jr., '99. 



Mitglkds Committee* 

II. R. Vahlkamt, '97. 
G. F. I'lmer, '98. 
G. C. WiNSLow, Jr., '99. 
\V. R. T<>WER, '00. 

Kh ren-PrasiJent. 
I'Ror. A. N. Van Daell. 



Progrfamin Commfttee* 

E. R. Heissler, *97. 

L. J. Seidensticker, *98. 

F. A. Werner, '99. 

A. G. A. Schmidt, *oo. 



EHREN-MITGUEDER. 



l*KKs. Francis A. Walker.* 

PkoF. CiKOR(,E T. DlPPOLD. 

Prof. IIeinrich (). Hofmann. 
Prof. Henry I*. Talmot. 
I*Rr»F. Harry W. Tyler. 
Prof. (JKoRriE F. Swain. 
Prof. Frank V<k,el. 



Herr Joseph Blachstein. 
Herr C H. L. N. Bernard. 
Herr L^on E. Bernard. 
Herr Ilstis Eriiardt. 
Herr IIarry M. Cioodwin. 
Herr G. Rissell Lincoln. 
Herr James H. Stanwood. 



W. A. FAxr>N. 

E. R. Heisslkr. 
S. 1^. Howard. 

W. Hi MI'IIREYS. 

F. H. Kkiskfr. 



WIRKLICHE MITGLIEDER. 
Kksse von )897. 



R. S. ViNAL. 



H. Orr. 

E. W. Ritchie. 

A. n. Spiess. 

H. R. Vaiilka.mp. 

T. E. ViDETO. 



W. A. Cleaveland. 
O. H. Leonard. 
C. W. Pendell. 
J. C. Riley. 
J. H. Sears. 



K. NL Blake. 
A. IL BRf)WN. 
(i. L Copp. 
S. Emery. 
(j. (). Jackson. 



M. Davenport. 
C. M. Hamburger. 



Klasse von ^898* 



Klasse von S899. 



Klasse von ^900* 



L. J. Seidensticker. 

G. S.MITH. 

R. Tietig. 

G. F. I'lmer. 

W. G. Zimmermann. 



A. A. Johnson. 

G. Magee, Jr. 

H. L. Morse. 

S. .MoTcii. 

G. C. Winslow, Jr. 



A. G. A. Schmidt. 
W. R. Tower. 



no 




OFFICERS. 
Executive Committee. 



ItKNRV (;. Pk.VRsoS-. 
CiK-.BliK llKKHUkT MfCAt 



FACULTY MEMBERS. 
Phksiuknt Phancis a. Walker.' 
I'Hoi-. Aki.ii iUiKs. Mr. Hknhv G. I'k.vrson. 

I'HOL-. Ch.^HLKS R, ChoSS- Ur. WU.LI.VM Z. Rll'I.KV. 

I'Ror. U. K. A. fi RRiHB. Vmn: Wim.iam T. Skih^whk 

Proi'. Davis R. Dkwkv. Mr.Jokn O. Stmseh. 

PHIIK. CiEllRI.K T. Dll'IOl.l). l*RC)f. AlI'ILONSK N. V.\N D.VI 



EVKRKTT NlLILI.r.s UlRTIS. 








(iKl)R(iK llEHllERT M.CaRTIIV. 


KRANKMN WuHNKV DxlJHI 


m. 






WlT.MVM TN..RST..S RVRKKB.Jl 


John Ar... sTt^^: D.ivovo-. 








Krskst Frank Riss. 


Lkstkr DlHAXn (iA«r.\KM. 








t'.aWIS RlTIIVF.N Sueak. 


Ai.KRKi) Starr Hamilton. 








EnWAHI) STrRTKVANT, 


SliKLlx.N Lkavjtt 1I<.«ari 








Frki) IIknrv Twomklv. 


l>,| 




• La 


iMIRJ. 


■.ST WlM,. 




IVre PresMcae. 



Pye^ident. 




WHENCE Lee Gaillahd. 








Seer. 


lary and Treasurer. 


ixo. Harb 


Y MosTiKix Keys, 




Rock-ill., Md. 






BERT Francis Portner, 




"»"■'"■■'. Vii. 




CASTLE. GeC 


ROE OWESS IIASKE 



Gran-ville Sm 
Oscar (iroriie 



Louisville, Kj-. 
Spartanburg, S. C. 
Charleston, S. C. 
Savannah, Ga. 
Rockville. Md. 
Charleston, S. C. 
Louisville, Ky. 
Matiassas, Va. 
Louisville, K)'. 



Washin 



. D. C. 



Washinglon, D. C. 




Kl.WAHI. RAVM..N1I Mo- 



Semliiry- Treasurer. 
Wacter Hesrv Lee. 



rHi:i<KKKK 1I..SMKR C." 
WlLI-JAM AmIIMY D..RK' 

IIakhv Lamih (;ram. 

SlANF.KV A.^AR II-UkKt 

Walter IIenkv I,i:e. 



> RaVIK.M) M..TIH. 

;h IIenkv Piuii. 



Wai-Tbr Lot is Rai 



Wn.I.HM R.\S1»)L|-|T Strkk 



Ri rnii.rn T[[ 




President. 
. P. BUERS, '97. 



C. B. Gii.Lso.\, '99. 



Executive CommittM. 



Charter Mendien. 



W. 



ASGI 



E. B. Cai 

V. D. ClIASK. ■( 
W. M. L'lTI.ER, 

R. S. De G..1.VI 
C. S. Drakk. ■. 
\V. B. Dwk.ht; 
M. Kr.\nk, -97. 



Active Member 



J. L. KVP 
L-. B. Gil 
M. W. Uj 



. M. Lk< 



I. 


W 


Riddle. 99. 


G 


H 


Street. ■■». 


M 


K 






S. 






(> 
J9- 


ZiMMERMANN, '98 

G. Magee. Jb 

H. C. MORRI 

W. C. Potter 
A. G. A. Sen 
T. E. Tallm 



\v- I. ' 

F. \Va' 



Anodate Mcmben. 

W. C00LII1(,K, '96. 

I>. E. Grav, ■99. 

II. V. V1>N lloLST, '96. 



"S 




|^asl)iiiPantof(Zlwt* 



Sec ri-tii ry-Ttemuri-r. 

OsiAR GeOKOE VO' 



flM<HV M..^TIl■■lX Kkv 

RoBKHT l'-K.\\C]>. Fori 



Granvilt.k 
Darwtn I'l 

OSC'AR GEOI 



OFFICERS. 



Vice President. 
Stanley Gay Hyde Fitch, 'oo. 



President. 

Herbert Ivory Lord, '98. 

Secretary. 

Edward Samuel Chapin, *98. 



Treasurer. 
Di'DLEY Malcolm Pray, '99. 



Director. 
Walter Humphreys, '97. 



Edgar Marvin Hawkins. 
Frederick John Hemmings. 
Roger Fuller Horspord. 



MEMBERS. 



Class of '97. 



Charles Swanberg Hurter. 
Harold Torey Mulhall. 
Henry Arthur Sherman. 



David Schw-artz. 



Leon All and. 

John Stearns Bleecker. 

Arthur Francis Brewer. 

Pail Clifford. 

Frank Forest Colcord. 

George Thurston Cottle. 

Everett Nichols Curtis. 

GEORCiE Rl PERT DaVISON. 

Simon Fleischer. 
Albert Webster Gray. 
Irvin Haves Kaufman. 

Charles- 



Oass of '98. 

Arthur Samuel Keene. 
Arthur Crosbie Lawley. 
Frank Erastus Mansfield. 
Joseph Julius Moebs. 
Arthur Felix Porter. 
Robert Winthrop Pratt, Jr. 
Godfrey Lewis Smith. 
William Frederick Steffens. 
Samuel Warren Stillings. 
Henry Howard Sullivan. 
Ralph Edward Wilder. 
-Edward Amory Winslow. 



Clifford Mann Balk am. 
George Winslow Brown. 
Harry Solomon Mork. 



Class of ^99. 



George Irving Copp. 
Robert Arthur Ferguson. 
Ernest Albrecht Regestein. 



Class of )900. 



James Hervey Batcheller. 
Walter Augustus Hallstrom. 



William Colegrove Saunders. 
Stanley Collamore Sears. 



117 



\ 



THE GUI 

CLUB 



'^<^ 




PrfSiiU-Hl. 
;r Owks All. 



L<.ri.s JKR.,MK Rk.ja. 






Field Af/in/iffrr, 
Stiart Bkrwk'k Mil. 



WAI.TI-R OttKN Al>AM 

KRKIIBBHK ClIKSl.KY .' 
CABLYLK NORKIS IlARI 
Gvr I>KliM-Ii:E BCHl'II 

Edijar Brrnarii C-MI 

EdMIS-I) iloRAl'K ni-R 

Earl Cai.dwei.[. Emkj 
Artlivr William Oei 



AlSTIX Kl.Y (JlIlSI.X. 
KTlfAN llKVRV Ih.WAUn. 

Stewart DtRWicK Millkr. 
Alhkkt Franklin Nathan, Jr. 

JlLiLS NOLTK. 

GK,>H(iK IlKVWOOU I'RIEST. 

l,ons JKRC)ME Rkiiards. 




QlKU 



Presidtal. 
Allen Winchester Jai 



LE Bolster, ' 
1 Dewey Bra 



EV, -97. 

•■• '97- 



L- Fdrd Hoit, '97. 



Paul Franklin JoHNSi 
Georue Euubne Matm 
Albert Franklin Na' 



Ross I 



TCcHnolopy Wlicclmenr 








P,:.'i,h»t. 




„,;,,.„,_ 


tl 


.WART. L. Con 


Secrvtary and Tr 


Kcr.KV. 


w, 


Lr\.M A, Ri.H[ 
MEMBERS. 


I'AVL F.John 


ROKEHT 


\I.1.V\. 




llARm.n W.Jones. 


UK.m^K 


11. ItooTII. 




Allin Loomis. 


Cir.VKLE 


T. ItKAMllALL 




DlBANO MAVEIt. 


\\IM.I,\\ 


»HK«STKR. 




Frank R, MisxKi. 


lloWAKI 


L, C.HUiRN, 




WoRTHiNiiTos Palmer. 


Ravmon 


) 11. UVSI-.IRT 


1. 


CllARLKS II. PF.ASB. 


Arti[[-h 


T. Davis. 




SlIlBLKV S. PrilLBRKK. 


Akthir 


K[,s.i.s-, 




JosEl'll C, RlLEV. 


IIOKAIK 


Kak.miam, 
I*. Farmiam. 




William A, Rohikson. 


(jKOHliK 


A. Filler. 




AlBKRT R. SUKIID. 


Asa W. 


CJROSVKSOH. 




CMARJ.KS II.S.MITH. 


Chakt.e 


M. 1Iamh.ro 


R. 


Lewis S, Htrenu. 


Fkki) L. 


Uwws. 




IIeS-RV il.SL-LLlVAN. 


I'AIL K. 


J.MiNM.N. 




TrioMAsJ.Sn.L.v.vs. 



LJIARLKs F. W[> 




SOCIEJKS 





. A 




I. R. A1.1.KN. 

E. B. BAt MANN. 

H. p. Beers. 
C. A. Be-nnink. 
G, E. Behgstroj 
W. n. Brahlev. 

G. Bl'RNIIAM. 

1>. I>. Cassiby. 

II. K. COSKIJS. 
P. E. COOMHH. 
W. E. CoTTBk. 

n. A. Clktis. 
W. H. Cl-tl-ER. 
W. S. B. Dana. 
II. VV. Davis. 
R. S. DeUolyei 

E. S. DODUE. 
J. R. UWVER. 

). F. Everett. 
M. F. EwEv. 
C. Ewi-vu. 

F. F. Fer.;i-son. 
W. II.FoN. 

I. L. Fvt-E. 

E. L. Gerkeh. 

F. B. flEATHMAN 
R. IIENHV. 

O. C. llERIMi. 

E. II. Hewitt. 

H. F. IIOFT. 

R. (i. Hoi,ABIHI>. 

E. L. Holmes. 

J. H. HOISE.JB. 

H. C. INGALLS. 



Executive Comniittee. 

miN. RVSSELC 



A. W. J 



A. S. Keene. 
F. H. Keisker. 
A. A. Lawrence. 

F. N. Lb Baros. 
JI. W, Lke. 

E. C. Little. 
E. B. Mead. 
M. F. Oliver. 
H.Obr. 
C. B. Paine. 
W. Pal-mer. 
R. W. Porter. 
W. E. Pltnam. 
P. Richardson. 
H. P. Richmond. 

A. E. Robin-son. 
N. P. RouD, 

B. F. W. RrssELL. 
R. E. Sawyer. 

E. 11. Sciiroedbr. 
H. M. Seaver. 

G. L. Smith. 
H. E. Smith. 
M. H. Smith. 
R. C. Spring. 
I Stone, Jr. 

T. E. Tallmadgb. 

R. TiETIO. 

A. U. Tucker. 
W. W. Wahb. 
II. K.White. 

R. B. WniTTEN. 
E. WOODVATT. 







Vice PrcsiJcHl. 
John K. Uai 






[NK S. Co' 

HJ) C. Siri! 



Executive Gjmmittee. 

Jons- B. t 



Programme Committee. 



I'H..]-. (iK<)H,;E F. i 

I'Kor. Dwi.wiT I'o 
R...,ER W. Bahsii> 

11. .RALE R.TllAVK 



I'RoK. Alemeo H. Bur- 
Pm.)k. C. Frank Alle 



HONORARY 
)F.sT pRANtis A. Walker.' 

■. I>W1.(IIT PORTKH, 



PRES 
pR 

Pr<ik. C. Frank 
Mr. F. p. MtKin 
Mr. M. S.James 
Mr. R. E. Bake> 



Prof. (iEOKC.E F. Swain. 
Prof. Alfred E. Burton. 
Prof. Arthur G. Rorbins. 
Mr. K. S. Swekt. 
Mr. C. M. Si'o 
Mr. II. C.STEVf 



MEMBERS. 



M. W. Allen. 
T. C. Atwood. 
II. W. Ballou. 
W. II. Barnes. 
E. P. Bliss. 
P. E. Blood. 
II. Borland. 
E. A. Brainerd. 
C. B. Breed. 

N. C. Bl'RRILL. 

J. E. Carty. 



L. Alland. 
L. C. Allen. 
A. E. Black MER. 
M. E. Brooks. 
W. L. Butcher. 
L. H. Byam. 
J. L. Carr. 
J. M. Chace, Jr. 
P. II. Dater. 
M. F. Delano. 
C. F. Drake. 
J. W. Fleet. 



Class of '97. 

C. B. Clark. 
L. S. Cowles. 
M. F'rank. 
W. A. Gleason. 

S. GoWEN. 

C. L. Hammond. 

J. H. HOWLAND. 
J. W. KiLLAM. 

J. E. Lewis. 

B. A. Loveland. 



Class of '98. 

A. French. 

E. W. Gehring. 

A. W. Gray. 

R. T. HORTON. 

\V. D. Hubbard. 
E. Johnson, Jr. 
E. A. Jones. 
E. P. Lane. 
J. H. Larrabee. 
J. J. Moebs. 
L. D. Peavey. 
R. W. Pratt, Jr. 



E. P. Osgood. 
A. L. Parsons. 

J. R. ROGERSON. 

H. F. Sawtelle. 
J. B. Stouder. 
C. H. Sweetser. 
M. K. Trumbull. 
W. J. Walther. 
T. Washburn. 
A. K. DowNES. 
W. Kent. 



B. B. Priest. 

R. R. RUMERY. 

E. C. Sherman. 
J. F. Sickman. 

C. J. Skinner. 
C. F. Smith. 

W. F. Steffens. 
W. R. Strickland. 
H. R. Thayer. 
G. W. Treat. 
G. R. Wadsworth. 
W. B. Wood. 



£. E. Abbee. 
G. D. Abeel. 
R. P. Anderson. 

A. L. Babbitt. 
C. W. Brown. 
G. P. Burch. 

B. F. Burnett. 



Class of *99. 

C. S. Drake. 

A. B. FooTE. 

B. Herman. 

F. E. Hermanns. 
A. R. Holliday. 

G. Magee, Jr. 
W. E. Parker. 

J. W. WOOLLETT. 



R. H. Pinkham. 

J. Real. 

H. H. Starr. 

F. R. Sites. 

L. R. Whitaker. 
W. C. Whitney. 

G. C. WiNSLOw, Jr. 



1^5 




Officers ' W9*>-7 
TresidriU - Pboctor Lamkrt Dowhertt 
Vice Treiident - IIENJ'^M1N Alfred Howp 
Secrrtary and Trresui-er— Royal Ho»a»T Haywaild 



Prei. Franci J A.Walker 
Prof. Chahles R.C(ou 
Prof, William 1.. Puftir 
Prof. Hakrt E.CuFFOdD 



'bonoran^ ilDcmbers 

Mr. Wiluam L. Smith 
Mr. LoLni DtRR 
Mr. Georoe V.Wcnmu, 
Mr, Chaele) L.Norton 



Mr, Frank A Law( 
Dr. HARRf M. Goodwin 



Mr Wiluam J, Drisko 
Mr, Ralph R . Lawrencb, 



Mr. William D. Coolidoe 



Programme Gmmiittee* 



C. F. Baldwin. 
L. A. Crowkll. 
C. II. Eames. 

W. C. EWING. 
G. R. Davison. 
R. M. Ferris, Jr. 
L. L. Gaii.lari). 
O. II. Gray. 



N. IIayward. 
J. E. IIazeltine. 
A. F. Howard. 
E. H. Howard. 
C D. Hubbard. 
W. L. Lee. 

C. E. Lord. 

D. Mayer. 



H. T 
\V. E 
L. G. 
W. O 
J. W. 
E. L. 
L. S. 
T. R. 



. muliiall. 
. Reed. 
Robinson. 
, Sawtelle. 

SlIUMAN. 
TiNKIIAM. 

Tyler. 
Weymouth. 



MEMBERS. 







Oass of '97. 




R. 


Anderson. 


J. W. Fitzgerald. 


W. L. Lee. 


C. 


F. Baldwin. 


L. L. Gaillard. 


J. W. Mahoney. 


E. 


L. Barkhoi'se. 


J. M. GlLMORE. 


E. S. Manson, Jr. 


D. 


Q^ Brown. 


O. II. Gray. 


C. L. Morgan. 


\\' 


. D. Brown. 


N. Hayward. 


H. T. Mulhall. 


E. 


A. CoLKMAN. 


R. II. Hayward. 


W. E. Reed. 


(;. 


\V. Craven. 


B. F. Healey. 


L. G. Robinson. 


F. 


B. Cutter. 


E. H. Howard. 


W. E. Sargent. 


w 


. II. Daniells. 


B. A. Howes. 


W. O. Sawtelle. 


p. 


L. Dougherty. 


C. D. Hubbard. 


J. W. Shuman. 


c. 


H. Eames. 


S. K. Humphrey. 


H. W. Smith. 


\v 


. C. EWING. 


H. D. Jackson. 


J. S. Smy'ser. 
E. L. Tinkham. 


w 


. R. Fairbanks. 


W. B. King. 


R. 


M. Ferris, Jr. 


V. R. Lansingh. 


J. Taylor. 
L. S. Tyler. 


F. 


C. Field. 


G. S. Lawler. 


G. 


L FiSKE. 


E. F. Learned. 
Oass of '98. 


T. R. Weymouth. 


M. 


V. Ayres. 


J. E. Hazeltine. 


L. W. Packard. 


T. 


H. BiSSELL. 


A. F. Howard. 


C. W. Pendkll. 


A. 


F. Brewer. 


C. S. Hkjh. 


H. A. Prime. 


W 


. Cornell. 


F. M. Kellogg. 


E. B. Richardson. 


L. 


A. Crowe LL. 


P. H. Lombard. 


A. E. Sargent. 


G. 


R. Davison. 


C. E. Lord. 


T. B. Smith. 


F. 


B. Dawes. 


H. Mack. 


W. D. Staples. 


C. 


S. Dixon. 


D. Mayer. 


L. S. Streng. 


R. 


C. FAUliHT. 


E. F. Morrill. 


F. Tappan. 


S. 


Fleisher. 


A. H. Nebel. 


M. de K. Thompson. 


c. 


W. Frazier. 


W. B. Nelson. 


W. A. Wilder. 


o. 


Horsey. 


H. B. Newhall. 


C. F. Wing, Jr. 



H. M. Case. 

W. Curry. 

H. M. CusiiiNc;. 

C. W. Corbett,Jr. 

S. A. Curtis. 

J. C. Drykr. 

|. A, Flemin(;s. 

*W. B. Flynn. 

F. F. FowLE. 

J. T. Frame. 



Oass of '99. 

R. Hasbrouck. 
J. A. Hayden. 
*B. P. Hazeltine. 
J. L. Hern. 
G. S. Hume. 
E. R. Jones. 
B. Jones, Jr. 
W. L. Morris. 
H. L. Morse. 
W. J. O'Leary. 



E. A. Regestein. 
A. W. Proctor. 
C. Renshaw. 
W. R. Sawyer. 
X. E. Seavey. 
M. C. Mott-S-mith. 
J. Walls. 
W. W. Wells. 
P. W. Witherell. 
W. L. Wood. 



127 




___ tim_ ) 




Chair, 
.[AM T. Si 



iRKT E. DODI). 
V. M. IloLMAN. 



Hekman W. Marsha 
Clarbncb W. Phrli 
Samuel C. Prkscot 
Pebcv G. Stiles. 

SrSANNAII USIIEK. 



# f 1%"^ (51I®IL@©D©^[L 




Prof. William H. Nilbs. 



Secretary. 
>KUS W. Grabau. 



Prof. Georub H. Barton. 
Prof. William O. Crosby. 
Grace M. Clarke. 
Mabel E. Clapp. 
Alvan L. Davis. 
ICatherinb E. Dolbear. 
Phillip Grabau. 



Harriet E. IIobbs. 
Charles S. Hurteh. 
Albert P. Norhis. 
William S. Rhodes. 
Hbyward Scudder. 
Albert E. Smvsbr. 
SusANN'Aii Usher. 



NAVAL ARCniTECTlJRAL SOCIETT 




OFFICERS. 

J'n-siiff,,/. 



WaLTKR KAVMnM, Bk.' 



Spfrttaty. 
WiLLMM Stark Ne' 



MEMBERS. 
RoBi-HT William Hailkv. Edwarii Evkrett Pierce. 

Frank Nelson IIoktox. Eihsar I'lERtE Trask. 

CitARLE.S IIaRSARI) PaOE. ERVINli Rl'DOLPII GURNBV. 

Jamie Dui'olass MaiBrii.e. 



INER5 1 IN ION 




We believe iN ARBITRATION; WHEN THAT FAILS — STRIKE. 



OFFICERS. 

President, 
William Daniels Blackmer. 



Chief Agitator. 
Frank Forest Colcord. 



Secretary and Treasurer. 
Lewis Andrews Hayden. 



MINERS. 



Howard Jonathan Benson. 
William Daniels Blackmer. 
Frank Forest Colcord. 
Howard Browning Collins. 
George McMurtrie Godley. 



Lewis Andrews Hayden. 
Charles Swanberg Hurter. 
Walter Livingstone Lovejoy. 
William McKell. 
Albert William Tucker. 



Model for (900. 
John Heber Slavins. 



"five Hours of chem. aNd No exams." 



131 




Vbo it comiof down the tirut, 

la the gloaming? 
Surely they arc eager feet 
Vhich are coming down the ilrect. 
Then there watches maid so sweet, 

XThile he's roaming. 
For his coming down the street 

In the gloaming. 



Uader. 


fp|:|i 


Lafokebt George Robinsok. 

M„.,„gtr. 
Framk EuiiENE Coombs. 




Fust TeDois. 
Frank Eugene Coombs. 




EUWA«1> THEODORK HlLURETH. 

Thomas William Sti rgeon. 


Pl»! 


Second Tenon. 


L^^Lxi ^^ 


Walter Owen Ahams. 


Lgf^jF jff 


Atiiertun Howe Tucker. 


11 ffl wM 


Augustus Clark Lamb. 


11 bI^J 1 


George Rero Wadswortii. 


^HmH 


Fiid Bus. 


iwpiif 


Howard JoNATH.VN Benson. 


fflBBW^^^^j 


WlNTtlROl- RUFUS UODCK. 


^^'9'idPr infl 


Charles Barnard Page. 


^^ff ^ 


Second Bui. 


HhL^P 


Oborob Rutherford Anthony. 


^^SH| m 


Louis William Skumaker. 


^yr :\ ] 


Harry George Johnson. 


Percy Rolfe Ziegler. 


Ni 








M 



3UTLIPF WEtnOl'TN B^°"R5 DPflAZCLTinE J« 



i 



Milton Wbston Hall. 



Jambs Ezra H, 



Miodolin*. 
Paul Ravmond Brooks. 
Milton Weston Hall. 
J' 



Argvle Ecclbston Robinson. 
Waltbr Kannrn Sutliff. 
Thomas Rotb Wbymouth. 



Lawrence Addicks. 

Robert Seelev De Golvbr, 

Benjamin Prbscott Ha^ieltine. 
Gborcb Reed Wadbworth. 




1^ 




MANDOLIN' 
CLUB 




r 


'^ 


^^w^m 


P 


* 




g 


PEPFiT CL^pr ppev/i scaTT 


•a 





Maiiagfr. 
Francis Minot Blake. 

BanJMuriiMS. 
Harvev Rowlam) Clapp. 
Walter Siott. 

Frank Bridgham Perry. 

Habrv Kbith White, 

Francis Minot Blake. 

Cardella Drake Brown, 



Lawrence Auorks. 

RURERT Seelkv De Golyeh. 

Benjami.v Prescott 11azelti.se, Jr. 



^ANJO 



Executive Officcn> 



PresideMl. 
Frank Eugbnb Coombs. 



Vict Prenidcal. 
Francis Minqt Blarb. 



Srrrelary. 

Georub Ruthbrford Anthony. 



TreasHrer. 
Waltbr Hannbn Sutliff. 



Gtneral Managtr. 
Al-gl'stus Clark Lahb. 



^LUMNi Associations. 



Technology ^lumni ?lssociaTioN. 

President. 
John R. Freeman, '76. 

Vice President. Secretary. 

Edwin C. Miller, '79. Augustus H. Gill, '84. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston. 

Executive Committee* 

The President, Vice President, and Secretary. 
George J. Foran, '83. Charles W. Taintor, '93. 



The (Northwestern ^ssocihtion. 

President. 
Frank Wells, '70. 

Vice President. Secretary and Treasurer. 

B. R. T. Collins, '88. E. M. Hagar, '93. 

554 The Rookery, Chicago, III. 

Executive Committee. • 

The President, Vice President, Secretary, and Treasurer. 
R. H. Pierce, '85. Solomon Sturges, '87. 



The Western Association. 

President. 
Edward W. Rollins, *7i. 

Vice President. Secretary and Treasurer. 

Bradford H. Locke, '72. Frank E. Shepard, '87. 

9^4 Washington Avenue, Denver, Col. 



The ^1. 1. T. Society of (^ew yoRK. 

Eicectitive Committee* 
George L. Heins, '82. Frank A. Pickbrnell, *i>5. 

Harvey S. Chase, '83. Edward D. Brown, '90. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 
Alex Rice McKim, 106 East Twenty-third Street, New York, N. Y. 



The (Connecticut Valley Association. 

Executive Committee* 

Chairman. 
Guy Kirkham, '87, Springfield, Mass. 

Henry Soither, 'S7. James S. Newton, *88. 

N. P. A. Carter, '87. Henry A. Francis, '83. 



The Tech Society of pHiLflDELPHia. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 
Luther K. Yoder, '95. 

Executive Committee. 
Am4^s J. BoYDEN, '75. Augustus B. Stoughton, *86. 

Wilfred Lewis, '75. Samuel S. Sadtler, '95. 



M4 



£l?\D\f3;E 




TARIES 



IVlBMBBRS OP THE ^eBOaiaTlON OP (JbflSS gBORBTSRIES OP THE 
rvJasSflCHUEBTTS INSTITUTE OP TBOHNOLOaY. 



Class of 
CU«s of 
Class of 
Class of 
Class of 
Class of 



Class of 
Class of 



- H. Richards, Representative, 

MassachuseltB Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass. 



e of Technology, Boston, Mass. 



'HOP. C. Frank Allen, 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Mnss. 

'73, Mr. Hf.nkv E. Lodge, 

4 Post Office Square, Boston, Mass. 

'74, Mr. Charles F. Read, 

165 A Street, South Boston, Mass. 



■75, Mr. E. a. W. H 



30 Norway Park, Hyde Park, Mas 



'76, Mr. John R. Freeman, 

Providence, R. I. 

'77. Mr. Ruhard a. Halh, 

Lawrence, Mass. 

1r. Linwooi> O. Townb, 

Haverhill, Mass. 



Class of '79, Mr. Harry H. Campbell, 

Steelton, Pa. 

Class of *8o, Prof. George H. Barton, Representative, 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass. 

Class of *Si, Mr. Frank E. Came, 

17 Place d'Armes Hill, Montreal, P. Q^ 

Class of '8j, Mr. Walter B. Snow, 

Watertown, Mass. 

Class of '83, Mr. Harvey S. Chase, 

8 Congress Street, Boston. 

Class of '84, Dr. Augustus H. Gill, 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass. 

Class of '85, Mr. Arthur D. Little, 

28 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 

Class of '86, Prof. Arthur G. Robbins, 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass. 

Class of '87, Mr. Edward G. Thomas, 

383 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 

Class of '88, Mr. William G. Snow, 

Watertown, Mass. 

Class of '89, Mr. Jamks W. Cartwright, Jr., 

Public Works Co., Bangor, Me. 

Class of '90, Mr. GEORCiE L. Gilmore, 

Lexington, Mass. 

Class of '91, Mr. Henry A. Fiske, 

93 Water Street, Boston, Mass. 

Class of '92, Prof. Severance Burrage, 

Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind. 

Class of '93, Mr. Frederic H. Fay, 

65 City Hall, Boston, Mass. 

Class of '94, Mr. Albert B. Tenney, 

Everett, Mass. 

Class of '95, Mr. Robert K. Shefpard, 

15 King Street, Worcester, Mass. 

Class of '96, Mr. Stephen D. Crane. 



146 



PrtsidtHl. 
Francis A. Walkbr, LL.D.' 



IIenrv M. IIOWB. 

Pbrcival Lowell. 



Executive CoounJttcc. 

GK W. Blodgett, Chairman. 

Waltbr S. Allbn. 
Uesmokd FitzGkrald. 



Seer eta ry. 

ROUERT P. BlGEL 







Caper tlkt. ^amlelk AUt/i Mrj! PiisJ - 
Huldunsan h^ctvor/h Sonera/'! /kjaaond /iorje 



l^ 




OFFICERS AND MEMBERS. 



Freiidtni. 
WiLFRBD BaNCKOFT, '97. 



Gborgb Reed Wadsworth, 'i 



Stertiary. 
Edward Hosmer Hammond, '99. 



Henry Waltbr Allbn, '97. William Otis Sawtbllb, '97. 

George Anthony Hutchinson, '9S. Ernbst Frank Russ, '98. 
Harry Leonard Morsb, '99, William Eaton Wbst, '99. 

Philip Benson Cooper, '00. Stanley Gay Hyde Fitch, '00. 

Sullivan Williams Jonbs, '00. 





:i 




,^1 


r / 

I' 








^^^^■^m -■^»Si 






■ ■« 

\ ' i 

f. 

r'4 


J- 

1 

»7 






11^ 


1- vii 








^^^^^^J^^^^Xli 



yOUNG rv]EN'S (?HRI5TmN ^JSSOCmTION. 



l^ce President. 
Clancey Montana Lewis. 



OFFICERS. 

President. 
George Isaac Fiske. 

Treasurer. 
William Eaton West. 



Secretary, 
Herbert Ivory Lord. 



MEMBERS. 



Lewis B. Abbot. 
David G. Abeel. 
Lawrence Addicks. 
Herbert H. Albee. 
Robert P. Anderson. 
William J. Angus. 
George D. Atwood. 
Milan V. Ayres. 
Charles J. Bacon. 
Fred L. Bardwell. 
Robert W. Bailey. 
John V. Bbekman, Jr. 
Lowry D. W. Bender. 
Thomas H. Bissell. 
Robert S. Blair. 
John S. Bleecker. 
Edwin P. Bliss. 
Raymond D. Borden. 
Edward M. Bragg. 
Louis B. Breer. 
Charles C. Briggs, Jr. 
John Brown. 
Frank E. Burnham. 
WiNTHROP F. Butler. 
Herbert M. Chase. 
John Campbell. 
Charles F. F. Campbell. 
Edward S. Chapin. 
Walter E. Chaffee. 
Walter A. Cleaveland. 
Clarence B. Cluff. 
Harold S. Conant. 
John E. Congdon. 
Frederick H. Cooke. 
Philip B. Cooper. 
William M. Corse. 
George T. Cottle. 
Samuel H. Crittenden. 
Harvey M. Cushing. 
Charles J. Davis. 
Frank E. Dodge. 
James C. Dryer. 
Charles H. Eames. 
William W. Eaton. 



Carleton Ellis. 
Lewis Emery. 
Frank W. Everett. 
William C. Ewing. 
Dwight Farnum. 
Raymond E. Farwell. 
Robert M. Ferris, Jr. 
Frederick C. Field. 
Leonard H. Field, Jr. 
Howell Fisher. 
George I. Fiske. 
Frank B. Fogg. 
Arthur B. Foote. 
Floyd J. Foster. 
Arthur L Franklin. 
Charles W. Frazibr. 
Francis G. Frink. 
Gerald Frink. 
Lester D. Gardner. 
Edwin W. Gehring. 
Charles B. Gillson. 
John N. Goddard. 
Lucius W. Godfrey, Jr. 
George McM. Godley. 
Herbert C. Greer. 
James R. Guy. 
Russell Hall. 
S. MiNARD Hall. 
Edwin W. Hammond. 
Edward H. Hammond. 
George W. Hamblet. 
Fred C. Hannah. 
Harry C. Hanson. 
Barton Haselton. 
George F. Hatch. 
George B. FIaven. 
Royal H. Hayward. 
Benjamin P. Hazeltine. 
Edward Herbert. 
Bernard Herman. 
Everett H. Hinckley. 
Arthur T. Hopkins. 
Robert M. Hopkins. 
Roger F. Horsford. 



151 



^LUMNI ?l550CmTI0NS. 



TBCHNOIiOGY ^lumni ^ssocihtion. 

President, 
John R. Freeman, '76. 

Vice President. Secretary. 

Edwin C. Miller, '79. Augustus H. Gill, '84. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston. 

Eicectitive Committee. 

The President, Vice President, and Secretary. 
George J. Foran, '83. Charles W. Taintor, '93. 



The Northwestern ^ssocihtion. 

President. 
Frank Wells, '70. 

Vice President. Secretary and Treasurer. 

B. R. T. Collins, '88. E. M. Hagar, '93. 

554 The Rookery, Chicago, 111. 

Eicectitive Committee* * 

The President, Vice President, Secretary, and Treasurer. 
R. H. Pierce, '85. Solomon Sturges, '87. 



The Western Association. 

President. 
Edward W. Rollins, '71. 

V^ice President. Secretary and Treasurer. 

Bradford H. Locke, '72. Frank E. Shepard, '87. 

924 Washington Avenue, Denver, Col. 

H3 



The ^1. 1. T. Society of (jIbw yoRR. 

Eicectitive Committee* 
George L. Heins, *82. Frank A. Pickernell, '65. 

Harvey S. Chase, '83. Edward D. Brown, 'yo. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 
Alex Rice McKim, 106 East Twenty-third Street, New York, N. Y. 



The (Connecticut Valley Association. 

Executive Committee* 

Chairman. 
Guy Kirkiiam, '87, Springfield, Mass. 

Henry Soither, '87. James S. Newton, *88. 

N. P. A. Carter, '87. Henry A. Francis, '83. 



The Tech Society of pHiLflMLPHia. 

Secretary and Treasurer. 
Luther K. Yoder, '95. 

Executive Committee. 
Am4^s J. Boyden, '75. Augustus B. Stoughton, *86. 

Wilfred Lewis, '75. Samuel S. Sadtler, '95. 



144 



S^tKWA 




TARIES 



IV^EMBBRS OP THB ^&50CiaTI0N 0E> ($LF1E6 ^ECRETflHmS OP THE 
^iBBBaCHUSETTB INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOaY. 



CJats of 
Class of 
ClasB of 
Class of 
Class of 
Class of 
Class or 
Class of 
Class of 
Class of 



- H. Richards, Repre 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology', Boston, Mass. 



s R. Cross, 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass. 



, Pbof. C. Frank Allex, 

Massachusetts Insiitute of Technology, Boston, Mass 



'73, Mr. Henry E. Lodge, 

4 Post Oflice Square, Boston, Mass. 



165 A Street, South Boston, Mas 



'75. Mr. E. a. W. Hai 



30 Norway Park, l-Ijde Park, Mass. 



•77, Mr. Rn hard A. H. 
L 

Class of -78, Mr. Li 



O. TOWNB, 

Haverhill, Mass. 



Class of '79, Mr. Harry H. Campbell, 

Steelton, Pa. 

Class of *8o, Prof. George H. Barton, Representative, 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass. 

Class of 'Si, Mr. Frank E. Came, 

17 Place d'Armes Hill, Montreal, P. Q. 

Class of '82, Mr. Walter B. Snow, 

Watertown, Mass. 

Class of '83, Mr. Harvey S. Chase, 

8 Congress Street, Boston. 

Class of '84, Dr. Augustus H. Gill, 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass. 

Class of '85, Mr. Arthur D. Little, 

28 Beacon Street, Boston, Mass. 

Class of '86, Prof. Arthur G. Robbins, 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Boston, Mass. 

Class of '87, Mr. Edward G. Thomas, 

383 Federal Street, Boston, Mass. 

Class of '88, Mr. William G. Snow, 

Watertown, Mass. 

Class of '89, Mr. James W. Cartwright, Jr., 

Public Works Co., Bangor, Me. 

Class of '90. Mr. George L. Gilmore, 

Lexington, Mass. 

Class of '91, Mr. Henry A. Fiske, 

93 Water Street, Boston, Mass. 

Class of '92, Prof. Severance Burrage, 

Purdue University, Lafayette, Ind. 

Class of '93, Mr. Frederic H. Fay, 

65 City Hall, Boston, Mass. 

Class of '94, Mr. Albert B. Tenney, 

Everett, Mass. 

Class of '95, Mr. Robert K. Sheppard, 

15 King Street, Worcester, Mass. 

Class of '96, Mr. Stephen D. Crane. 



146 



SOCICTY 




■^ OrADTS 



President. 
Francis A. Walker, LL.D.' 



Henkv M. Howe. 
Fercival Lowell. 



Executive Cofluohttt. 

.GE W. Blodcbtt, Chairman. 

Walter S. Allen. 
Desmond FitzGerald. 

Secretary. 

ROUERT P. BiCELUW. 



sriT^T- orriiiii! 



^:^g^ 'feUi 



liggj^ 



f f « I I 1^, 



Cocpfr f-ifiUi. ^ajyfe/U A/lta h/ejl ffijJJ ■ 




OFnCERS AND MEHtBEBS. 



PresidtHt. 

WiLFRBD BaNCHOPT, '97. 



Vice President. 
GtonCE Reed Wadsworth, ' 



Setretary. 
Edward Hosmbr Hammond, '99. 



IlKNRy Walter Allen, '97. 
Gborce Anthony Hutchinso 
Harry Leonard Morsb, '99. 
Philip Benson Coopkr, '00. 



William Otis Sawtbllb, '97. 
Ernbst Frank Russ, '98. 
William Eaton West, '99. 
Stanley Gay Hyde Fitch, '00. 



Sullivan Williams Joi 




^ 



yOUNG IN^EN'S (?HRI5TiaN ^ssocmiioN. 



Vice Presiiiefii, 
Clancey Montana Lewis. 



OFFICERS. 

President. 
George Isaac Fiske. 

Treasurer. 
William Eaton West. 



Secretary, 
flERBERT Ivory Lord. 



MEMBERS. 



Lewis B. Abbot. 
David G. Abekl. 
Lawrence Addicks. 
Herbert H. Albee. 
Robert P. Anderson. 
William J. Angus. 
George D. At wood. 
Milan V. Ayres. 
Charles J. Bacon. 
Fred L. Bardwell. 
Robert W. Bailey. 
John V. Beekman, Jr. 
LowRY D. W. Bender. 
Thomas H. Bissell. 
Robert S. Blair. 
John S. Bleecker. 
Edwin P. Bliss. 
Raymond D. Borden. 
Edward M. Bragg. 
Louis B. Breer. 
Charles C. Briggs, Jr. 
John Brown. 
Frank E. Burnham. 
WiNTiiROP F. Butler. 
Herbert M. Chase. 
John Campbell. 
Charles F. F. Campbell. 
Edward S. Chapin. 
Walter E. Chaffee. 
Walter A. Cleaveland. 
Clarence B. Cluff. 
Harold S. Conant. 
John E. Cong don. 
Frederick H. Cooke. 
Philip B. Cooper. 
William M. Corse. 
George T. Cottle. 
Samuel H. Crittenden. 
Harvey M. Cushing. 
Charles J. Davis. 
Frank E. Dodge. 
James C. Dryer. 
Charles H. Fames. 
William W. Eaton. 



Carleton Ellis. 
Lewis Emery. 
Frank W. Everett. 
William C. Ewing. 
DwiGHT Farnum. 
Raymond E. Farwell. 
Robert M. Ferris, Jr. 
Frederick C. Field. 
Leonard H. Field, Jr. 
Howell Fisher. 
George I. Fiskb. 
Frank B. Fogg. 
Arthur B. Foote. 
Floyd J. Foster. 
Arthur I. Franklin. 
Charles W. Frazier. 
Francis G. Frink. 
Gerald Frink. 
Lester D. Gardner. 
Edwin W. Gehring. 
Charles B. Gillson. 
John N. Goddard. 
Lucius W. Godfrey, Jr. 
George McM. Godley. 
Herbert C. Greer. 
James R. Guy. 
Russell Hall. 
S. Minard Hall. 
Edwin W. Hammond. 
Edward H. Hammond. 
George W. Hamblet. 
Fred C. Hannah. 
Harry C. Hanson. 
Barton Haselton. 
George F. Hatch. 
George B. Haven. 
Royal H. Hayward. 
Benjamin P. Hazbltine. 
Edward Herbert. 
Bernard Herman. 
Everett H. Hinckley. 
Arthur T. Hopkins. 
Robert M. Hopkins. 
Roger F. Horsford. 



151 



Y. M. C A. MEMBERS. 



CONTINUED. 



John H. House, Jr. 
Herbert H. Howe. 
Herman R. Hunt. 
Frederick D. B. Ingalls. 
Arthur L. Jennings. 
Carl F. Johnson. 
Daniel S. Johnson. 
William A. Johnston. 
Ervin Kenison. 
Elwell F. Kimball. 
George I. King. 
Carleton S. Koch. 
John H. Larrabee. 
Frederick H. Lathrop. 
Charles T. Leeds. 
Joseph E. Lewis. 
Clancey M. Lewis. 
Owen L. Leonard. 
G. Russell Lincoln. 
Jesse T. Lippincott. 
Herbert L Lord. 
Salvador Madero. 
Thomas F. J. Maguire. 
Everett H. Master. 
Frederic L Merrick. 
Allyne L. Merrill. 
Robert J. Mervan. 
Harold L. Morgan. 
Albert F. Nathan. 
Newitt J. Neall. 
Willard B. Nelson. 
Henry B. Nkwiiall. 
Clarendon Nickerson. 
Charles B. Page. 
James A. Patch. 
Cecil H. Peabody. 
Leroy D. Peavey. 
Charles W. Pendell. 
Herbert A. McPherson. 
Edward E. Pierce. 
DwiGHT Porter 
John L. Porter. 
Nathaniel D. Rand. 
William E. Reed. 
Arthur A. Reimer. 
Walcott Remington. 
Robert H. Richards. 



Percy R. Ziegler. 



Chester A. Richardson. 
Robert P. Roberts. 
Laforest G. Robinson. 
Thomas P. Robinson. 
Richard C. Rossmassler. 
Walter B. Russell. 
William C. Saunders. 
Warren W. Saunders. 
Leo. W. Schlegelmilch, Jr. 
Albert G. A. Schmidt. 
Walter Scott. 
Lewen F. Searle. 
Kenneth Seaver. 
William T. Sedgwick. 
Brackley a. Shaw. 
Charles E. Sherman 
Miles S. Sherrill. 
Louis W. Shumaker. 
Charles J. Skinner. 
Theodore W. Sleidemann. 
William G. Smith. 
William H. Smith. 
Jacob Stone, Jr. 
Henry H. Sullivan. 
James Swan. 
KiLBURN S. Sweet. 
Thomas E. Tallmadge. 
WiLBERT C. Tandy. 
Mark E. Taylor. 
Charles A. Torrey. 
George R. Townsend. 
Edward P. Trask. 
William A. Tucker. 
Atherton H. Tucker. 
Frank Vogel. 

Francis A. Walker, LL.D.* 
Richard Wastcoat. 
Erwin C. Weeks. 
George V. Wendell. 
John F. Wentworth. 
William E. West. 
William R. Whitney. Ph.D. 
William H. Whitten, Jr. 
Lewis W. Wickes. 
S. Homer Woodbridge. 
Allen H. Woodward. 
John W. Woollett. 



152 




.©ege^i ^%f lyC 



Vice President. 
Asa Waters Ghosveso 



Frfsidenl. 

Ric Nelson Le Rarun. 

Thomas Eddy Tallmai 

J DUCALD MaCLACHLAN. 



( 


Sen. Francis A. Wali 


(ER,- FROV 


1 THE FACULTV. 






Thomas Cl.vi 


HK Atwood, '97. 


Thomas 


Eddy Tallmadge, 


■98. 




ROOER FL'LI.1 


;r Horsford, ■97. 


Gerald 


Basil Strrbt, '99. 






Frederic Ne 


LSON Le Baron. ■97. 


Ghorgr 


Carlos Winslow, 


JR., 


■99. 


Asa Waters 


Grosvenor, 'aS. 


Maurice Davenport, '00, 








Thomas Ne» 


i«.TH, Jr., 


'00. 







Tlie fundB accruing to ihiB Socieiv from the sale of membership 
tickets nt^ entirelv devoted to scholnrships for deserving studeniB. 
The directors serve without any emolument whatsoever. 




ttijJchn'Jirarilet 
JXPiSrillxisav/illto 




Clqjj I)(Wy' 




June 7, 1896, Trinity Church, 

B AtCALAlREATE SeRMON HY ReV. E. WINCHESTER DoNALI). 



Second Marshal. 
John Arnold Rockwell, Jr. 

Stephen Dow Crane. 
TOSETH Drisc'oll. 
Frank Kdward (tittill. 
Marshall Or a LEiciHTON. 
Charles E. Eocke. 
John Henry Manahan. 



(XASS DAY COMMITTEE* 

First Marshal. 

He NJ AM IN IIlRI). 



Third Marshal. 

Butler Ames. 



Irvinc; Seward Merrell. 
Daniel Artemas Richardson. 
Frederick William Smyser. 
Alhkrt William Tiio.MrsoN. 
John Tilley, Jr. 
Charles Elithalet Trout. 



June 8, 1896, Huntington Hall. 



PROGRAMME. 



Ovcrtun' 

Address by Preside 

Music 

History 

Music 

S fa/is lie.' 

Afusic 

Prophecy 

Music 

Poem 

Music 

Oraliou 

Music 



nt of the Clasi 



Orchestra. 

Charles Oilman Hyde. 

Orchestra. 

Ali'honsl's Ligouri Drum. 

Orchestra. 
. Joseph Harrington. 
. Orchestra. 
Conrad Henry YocMi. 
. Orchestra. 
Edward Stacey Mansfield. 

. Orchestra. 
Henry Arthur Waterman. 

Orchestra. 



IS6 




UTidi/'bLiorv % 

massif I I J J /o. 

HunlinEton Hall, Jmu 9, 1896. 

AMn-sf Presidrnt Francis A. Walkei 

Reading of Abctncts of ThcMt. 

,1 Praelii-.il Inve^H^alioK of Hl.-ac6fnff Colloa 

Clolb, f-y lh€ Malher hier .... Danibl Moore Bates. Ji 

The Cfr „r Small .Wntl.ls for lie Delrrmimtlion 

oti>l„hillly . ■ 

Kdwari) Mn-Tos Br.\ou ami Walter Swift Lelani 

(hmofir Fres>«re MeusurrmeHls ami Ike Valid- 
il\ of Avogadrof Lam an AfplieJ In 
^alu/iims GeoRue KimbaLi. Bvrdes: 

(Uologieal nistary of Lake Voehiluale . Miss KLIzABETir Florette Fishei 

A PInit for Se-verairc and Se-.vage Disposal in 
lie Town of'.\eedA.i«i .... 

Charles Uii.man Hvue and William Horatio McAldm 

Melbodi of EHfOuraaing Immigral/an lo Ike. 

Vailed Slale>,' .' Joseph HvuE Knhiii- 

A Study of a Spi/zkasleH Charles E. Lulke. 

A Compamlive Study of the EMeiracy of lie 

Pressed i-e>i>tf Sold i« lioslon .... ClArenie Warner Pehlev 

Acadrmir Halt and (:vHiHa>i«H, for liadeliffe 

College ..'..■ Miss Esther Sto.sk, 

An InrestigiitioH of CirtaiH Properties of 
Wooden Rimmed Fly Wlieets . 

.\niEHT William Thomi-son and Conrah Hesrv Yorxo. 

Ab iHvestigatioH of tie Atelylear Prepared from 

Copper Aeelyllde ...... Charles WiLLiAM Ticker. 

A Design for a .Jaekknife Drawbridge for a 

boahle-traci fiail'road Charles Aistin Wbntworth. 

An Imvesti/ratiou of Certain Alleriiating Cvrrent 
Pkenome-a ....'.. 

La-hbert Ni-TT Whitney and Walter Otis Pennell. 

iS7 




Second Vice Prrudenl. 

Herbert McCarthy, '97. 

Sectetary. 
Alfred Starr Hamilton, '97. 



Executive Committee* 



WaLKER (?LUB pLflYS. 



"MR. JONES, INSTRUCTOR." 

A Comedy in One Act, by H. D. Htnt, '97. 
The Gtft of Characters* 



Tom Jackson (Mr. Jones, Instructor) , A Student at 

Jack Spofford, Tom's chum 

Miss Marv Spofford, Jack's sister 

Miss Eudora Weeks, A student of Geologv 

Mr. Robert Spotford .... 

Mr. Alonzo Brown, Instructor at M. I. T. 

Miss Alice Langham, Miss Spo!ford*s friend 

Mr. Henderson Jackson, Tom's father 

James ........ 



Scene : Library at Mr 



M. I. T., Mr. Frank E. Guptill, '96 
Mr. Lester D. Gardner, '98 
Mr. Godfrey L. Smith, '98 
Mr. Oswald C. Hering, '97 
Mr. Edwin C. Cramer, '96 
Mr. Everett M. Curtis, '98 
Mr. Joseph Cishing, '96 
Mr. Wm. K. Fairbanks, '97 
Mr. George H. Wright, '98 



Sf afford* s house. 



the X-ray machine. 



A Comedy in One Act. 



The Cast of Characters. 



Prof. C. Eddy Current, A man with an idea 
Mr. D. Andy Oldboy, Elderly but fascinating 
Mr. Peter Whitehead, A little deaf . 
Miss Roxanna Wheeler, The new old woman 
Miss Dorothy Wheeler .... 
Miss Mary Ann O'Shady, A fine figure of a girl 



Mr. Everett M. Curtis, '98. 

Mr. Frank E. Guptill, '96. 

Mr. Oswald C. Hering, '97. 

Mr. Lester D. Gardner, '98. 

Mr. Durand Mayer, '98. 

Mr. Augustus C. Lamb, '97. 



Scene : The office of Prof. C. Eddy Cur re tit. 



MANAGERS. 

Mr. Harry D. Hunt, '97, Manager in Chief. 

Mr. Charles W^ Bradlee, '97, Business Manager. 

Mr. George II. McCarthy, '97, Financial Manager. 

Mr. Henry K. Sears, '96, Stage Manager. 



161 




TROISIBME REPRESENraTION THEaTRaUE. 
gOCIETE PRBNCaiSE bflVENIR. 

Prtsente U Sameili, 19 Dcumbrc. 1896. 



LES AMOURS D'UN TECHNOLOGIEN. 



M. Delaroux . . , . 


Personna 


J«- 


M. C. T. Lebds 


Mme. Delaroux, sa feinine 






M. F. W. SOUTHWORTH 


Elise. kurfille . . . . 






M. O. G. Luytiks 


Fred Larkiii. leur iievei. . 






. M. F. 1[. MiiCrudden 


A. Percy Cliolmoiidele.v, LL,I>. 


A.S.S. 




M. C. E. Lord 


HarrvRiclmrdson, .on beau-fiU 






. M. U. E. Lynch 


Mile. Marv Ann O'Sd.ii.ghnessj 


do,nesti<,ue 




M. G. L. Smith 


Terence Mulvanev, cocher 






. M. E. S. Chapin 




VAUDEVILLE 




Weary Willie and DuMy Denny 




Mm. 1>,\visiin et Rogers 


nanse Espagnole 




. M. G. E. Lynch 


Character Sketch 




. Mm. Mason- ET Smith 


Monologue de Coquelin 






. M. C.-E. A. WiNSLOw 



M. II. I. Lord. 

M. J. A. CoLLIN! 

M. W. O. 



DircctJcm it la Rcpccscntatiaii. 
M. C. II. L. N. Behnai 



M. E. P. Mason. 
M. G. T. Cottle. 
M. H. C. Morris. 



rDEsnriAN dinneb 



rT/'"**' 



Toast maiiter. 
Clifford Milton Lkonard. 

The Cane Rush Stanley Gay Hyde Fitch. 

The Competitive Drill Frederic Elmer Foye. 

Glitterinj' Generality Milton Weston Hall. 

Co-Eds GEoR(iE Otto Schneller. 

The Class Philip Benson Cooper. 



Young's Hotel, March 27, 1897. 



164 








Toas/master- 
Ahtiiuh Lcttle IIamiltuk. 

Address Edward Hommer Hammond. 

Our Late President Clarence Renshaw. 

{Benjamin Prescott Uazeltinb, 
Lawrence Addicks. 
Harrv Kkith White. 

Athletics Harry Lkunard Murse. 

TeciiNiquE Roland Williams Stebbins. 

Music '99 QUARTETTB. 

That Painful Necessity Geralu Martin Ricilmond. 

Retrospect William Malcolm Corse. 

■■ The Tech '■ Edwin Rutrven Siirak. 

Music Oscar Georob Vogt. 

Faint Heart Norman Paul Rood. 

The Institute Alexander Rieman Hollidav. 

Music Harrv Georoe Johnson. 

Our Kresliman Loi;is William Siil'maker. 



Hotel Bruiwwick, March 12, 1897. 




Toast master. 
Herbert Ivory Lord. 

Class of '98 George Reed Wadsworth. 

The Faculty Lester Durand Gardner. 

*' The Tech" Woman Leon Alland. 

Music '98 Quartette. 

GEOR(iE Rutherford Anthony. Winthrop Rufus Dodge. 

Frank Eigkne Coombs. Atherton Howe Tucker. 

"Mone^' Edward Samuel Chapin. 

Vacation Edward Johnson, Jr. 

The West Thomas Eddy Tallmadge. 

Music Banjos and Guitar. 

Francis Minot Blake. Robert Seeley De Golyer. 

Frank Bkidgham Perry. 

Theatricals Ernest Frank Russ. 

The Junior '* Prom." Asa W^aters Grosvenor. 

c. • ( Everett Nichols Curtis. 

Stories \ 

y- John Stearns Bleecker. 

Duet Mandolin and Guitar. 

George Reed Wadsworth. James Ezra Hazeltine. 

Athletics Harold Wellington Jones. 

Spirits RoMULT Allyn. 

The South Maurice de Kay Thompson, Jr. 

Music '98 Quartette. 

Labor Unions Frank Forest Colcord. 

New England Carleton Spaytii Koch. 

Personalities Albert Rix Shedd. 

Poem George Henry Wright. 

Duet Mandolin and Guitar. 

TECHNiquE Charles-Edward Amory Winslow. 

Technology Howell Fisher. 



Exchange Qub, March 6, 1897. 



166 




IIenrv Waltkr Allen. 

The Class or'97 Wilfred Bancroft. 

A Few of My Particular Friend« Jons Arthur Colliks, Ji 

Music, '97 Quartette .... Messrs. Lamb, Barker. Robinson. Howland. 

AihlelicB Thurlow Wasuburk. 

Fifty Years Ago Joseph Bancr 

Philisiinism and Science Harry Draper Hi 

MubIc '97 Qu 

SnicJe Talks with Men Oswald Constantin Hering. 



Young't Hotel, March 6, 1897. 



Otbni^^Qtctoral Committee- 



ci,i.;»i,iH. 


Secretary. 


:,\VMUM> SmfTJI WlM.IS. 


IIkrhert Ivory Lord. 




MEMBERS. 


RcillEHT Al.LVX. 


SVMNl-R MOI-LTON MlI.LlKES. 


(it,.«<;F. R,TMKRr..R,. Ant.h 


J.-...VS N-.,LTE. 


WlI.MAM DVXIEI.S ]i[.A.KMEB 


.. JosEi-H Calns R11.EV, Jr. 


John Stkarns Blkkikkr. 


Khnest Frank R. ss. 


l':i>HARri Samiei. L-|HT'[\. 


WlLLIA.M RANHOLI'II STRICKLAND. 


KkANK ElliKSK COOMHS. 


TlK.MAS Krmv TALI.MAlWiE. 


Ilou-ELL Fisher. 


FbF.1> )IeNHV TWOMBI.V. 


Maiit:i. Fm.ha K.irhest, 


(iK..R,,c Frkderuk L-lmer. 


Lester D.kan.. Gar-nkr. 


George Rkko Wads wort 11. 


WiLMAM M.lNTAOt-E HALI.. 


\Vari> WKi.MMiTo.v Ward. 



s-Edward .\m(.rv Wii 







W\ 



Tallmade^c-^^ihaw-ivinsbtr- JtncXibad fluiit 




BOARD OF EDITORS. 
Editor in Chief. 



AHtfUnt Editor in Chief. 
Clarence Res'niiaw, '99. 



Harry Dkai'ER IIvnt, '97. 
Morris Kixnahd Trimbill 
Thomas Eddv Tali.madce, ' 



Harold Wellington Jones, '98. 
Uborue Reed U'adsworth, '98. 
William Eaton West, '99. 
Gerald Martin Richmond, '99. 



ButiaeK VUaa^. 

1 Strickland, '98. 



A Mutant Bittinett Muuser. 
Edwin Rvthven Shear, 'yi). 



Technique, '95, 



BOARD OF EDITORS. 

Editor in Chief. 
Raymond Smith Willis. 

Associate Editors. 
Ciiarles-Kdwari) AMf)RY WiNSLow. Lester Durand Gardner. 

Society Editor. 

(fEOR(>E FRKI»ERirK I'LMER. 

Statisticians. 
William Daniels Blackmer. George Reed Wadswortii. 

Athletic Editor. 
Harold Wellington Jones. 

Artistic Staff. 

Thomas Kddy Tallmadge, ?2ditor. 

Carrol Augi sti's Bknmnck. W\\rd Wellington Ward. 

Business Manager. 
IIkrkert Ivory Lord. 

Assistant Business Manager. 
Walter Gistavk Zimmermann. 



172 




*^ 



VI 




r>' 



./ 



<<. 








w^^^99tm ^K 



yt^ 




lJ 



-i. BfiM*-^ 




"^^ 








'^^-^r^ 



r- 




^^,^': 



i^ 



1^ 



a. 




4»0%%» ^U(»M*4 ^tMtmiUi, 




'v^ 




A -. 




c^ 






T;'E NK^A' Y.RK 
}'.h\.]r i [BRASY 



A • 



•9 -\ 



• NP 4 T IONS 




BOARD OF PUBUCATION. 



ChairmaH. 

William T. Sbdgwick. 



Henry M. Howe. 



A. Lawrence RoTCti. 



D WIGHT Porter. 



Editor. 
Robert P. Bigblow. 




jENIOR pORTfOLlO 



Mahsiiai.1. Ora I.ki 



A..,.ERT JAIIK.M.N WE[ 

Harry Wi.si; Dvkr. 



NCR Warner Perlev. 
lVN V. Von lIoLST. 



L 




long 



V^ DSrmtoa '""^ 




-pracK - \ -^ 

Mil 



m 



'^*;s« 1.V 



^tiiTORiaL ON (Jenersl Athletics. 



TECHNOLOGY'S athletic history is brief, but by no means one to 
be ashamed of. During the past fifteen years our athletes have 
striven to bring glory to their college in various lines and with 
varying success. It might be expected that at an institution like our own, 
where so much time has to be given to class work, very little could be 
accomplished in the way of athletics ; but such has not been the case, and we 
look back with no little pride upon our records. Though we cannot always 
develop a winning team, yet we can always aim for the high standard which 
has been maintained in years past. 

Track athletics is, perhaps, the branch in which we have won the most 
honors in recent years ; and while our record of last spring is not one in which 
we take pride, yet our prospects for the present year are bright. Last year our 
Relay Team was very successful, defeating three colleges of a high athletic 
standard, at Philadelphia. 

In baseball we have no 'Varsity nine, but a great deal of interest is taken in 
the development of teams from the two lower classes. These class baseball 
teams compare very favorably with strong nines from many good preparatory 
schools in the vicinity of Boston. 

The Tennis Association, formed in 1895, is in a flourishing condition, two 
tournaments having been held since then. 

In the following pages devoted to athletics, the object has been to place, in 
as compact a form as possible, the athletic events which have taken place at 
Technology during the past year, as well as many items of general interest. 
In preceding Techniques it has often been the custom to include much which 
has to do with athletics entirely outside of Technology* While comparisons 
may in some cases be interesting, yet such a mass of statistics is often the 
reverse, and it has been thought best, therefore, to omit them, especially as the 
difficulty of obtaining accuracy is very great. 



176 






President. 




Asa Waters Grosvbnor 


Vice President. 




Harrv Leonakd Mors 


K, '99. 




Treasurer. 




Van Rbnsselabr Lan^jikg 



Secretary. 
DURAND Mavbr, '98. 



Executive 

iA Waters Grosvenor, Captain of Ttthnology Track Team. 
Charles Bowlbs Stebdins, Captain of 'gj Track Team. 

Harold Wbllinoton Jones, Captain of '95 Track Team. 
William Eaton West, Captain of "99 Track Team. 

RvssELL Harker Pribst, Captain of 1900 Track Team. 




/ten /iirahaar - Cra^ • ^cUseahu^ ■ 







Captain. 

Hbnrv Cummincs, Jr., '96. 



TRACK TEAM. 



,■96. 



Rbvbbn Edward B, 
Benjamin Hurd. '96. 
Owen IIerrick Gray, '97. 
Stanley Agar Hooker, '97. 
Edwin Putnam Osgood, '97. 
Achilles Henry Pugh, '97. 
Charles Bowles Stebbins, '97. 
William Laramv Butcher, '98. 
William 



Asa Waibrs Grosvenor, '98. 
Harold Wellington' Junbs. '98. 
DuRAND Mayer, '98. 
Julius Nolts, "98. 
Ralph Rollins Rumery, '98. 
Robert Arthur Ferguson, '99. 
Horace Porter Farnham, '99. 
Fred Lewis Holt Kimball, "99. 
is West, '99- 




I Ml 



Gray -Jfoater- hk^t -Pqsh ■ 




H. L T. V*. Amli«»t, TorwatM Polyteehnic InrtituU, and Union, Franklin Field, PhiU- 
dclphia. April 25, 1896. 

Won by M. I. T. Time, 3 min. 37! sec. 

The men ran in the following order : Gray, Pugii. Cumminds, Stebbins. 

By winning this race, M. I. T. was eligible to compete with five other winning 
teams for the championship of the United Stales. The lime of 3 minutes 37^ seconds 
was bettered by only two teams. Harvard and Lafayette. The team enjoyed the hos- 
pitality of the Mask and Wig Society during its stay in Philadelphia. 



H. L T. vs. &0WI1, Holmes Field, Cambridge, May 9, 18%. 

Won by M. 1. T.* Time, 3 min. igi see. 

The men ran in the following order: Gray, Fuch, Cumk 



{, Stedi 



M. L T. VI. Brown, Medunkt Hali, Batoo, February 6, 1897. 

Won by Brown. Time, 3 min. 19I sec. 

The men ran in the following order : Grosvbnor, Lathrop, Gray, Stebbins. 



M. L T. vs. Boston Cblleee, Mechanics Hall, Boston, March 12, )897. 

Won by M. r. T. Time, 3 min. igi sec- 

Themenran in the following order ; Grosvenob, Priest, Lathbop, Stebbin 



^EW QMaLSMt) 



I 



?1 



NTERCOLLBGiaTB tlTHLETIC t1 SSOCIHTION. 



^ 



AmherRt College. 
Bowdoin College. 
Brown University. 
Dartmouth College. 
Institute of Technology. 



MEMBEEIS* 



Trinity College. 

Tufts College. 

Wesleyan University. 

Williams College. 

Worcester Polytechnic Institute. 



OFFICERS. 



President^ J. N. Pringle, Dartmouth. 

Vice President, I. G. Hicks, Brown. 

Secretary. I. R. Kent, Tufts. 

Treasurer^ II. W. Jones, M. I. T. 



C. A. Booth, W. P. I. 



Executive Committee* 
T. L. Pierce, Bowdoin. 



J. II. Lecour, Trinity. 



Tenth ^nnuhl ^Ieeting of the C:Ibw ^nglhnd 
Intercollegihte Athletic ^ssocihtion. 

Worcester, May 23, ^896. 

BVBNT. WINNERS. TIME, HBIOHT, OR DISTANCE. 

joo'Vard Dash .... D. F. O'Brien, Brown lo 2-5 sec. 

H. H. Sears, Dartmouth. 

H. H. Christopher, Dartmouth. 

220' Yard Dash .... D. F. O'Brien, Brown 23 1-5 sec. 

R. T. Elliott, Amherst. 
C. F. Kendall, Bowdoin. 

440' Yard Dash . . . . C. B. Stebbins, M. I. T 52 3-5 sec. 

R. T. Elliott, Amherst. 
W. H. Hall, Dartmouth. 

SSo- Yard Run C. E. Bolser, Dartmouth 2 min. 3 sec. 

H. P. Kendall, Amherst. 
A. W. Boston, Dartmouth. 

One-Mile Run J. N. Pringle, Dartmouth .... 4 min. 42 4*5 sec. 

F. A. Tower, Wesleyan. 
S. B. FuRBUSH, Amherst. 

Two- Mile Run F. A. Tower, Wesleyan 10 min. 27 4-5 sec. 

O. N. Bean, Brown. 

J. D. Sinkinson, Bowdoin. 

One-Mile Walk .... H. F. Houghton, Amherst . . . 7 min. 16 4-5 sec. 

E. E. Tyzzer, Brown. 
W. J. Bartlett, Brown. 

Two-Mile Bicycle . . . G. L. Gary, Dartmouth 6 min. 28 1-5 sec. 

C. W. Donahue, Tufts. 
H. P. Farnham, M. I. T. 

182 



120- Yard Hurdle 



220 Yard Hurdle 



Running Broad Jump 



Running High Jump 



Pole Vault 



Putting Shot (j6 lbs.) 



S. Chase, Dartmouth 
J. H. HoRNE, Bowdoin. 
A. MossMAN, Amherst. 

S. Chase, Dartmouth 
J. H. HoRNE, Bowdoin. 
A. MossMAN, Amherst. 

S. Chase, Dartmouth 
J. H. HoRNE, Bowdoin 
T. W. Chase, Dartmouth 

I. K. Baxter, Trinity 
E. G. LiTTELL, Trinity . 
M. H. Tyler, Amherst 

W. A. Wyatt, Weslejan 
R. P. Wilder, Dartmouth 
E. L. Morgan, Amherst 
H. E Scott, W. P. I. 

E. R. Godfrey, Bowdoin 

F. E. Smith, Brown 
M. H. Tyler, Amherst 



16 1-5 sec. 



26 1-5 sec. 



Throwing Hammer ( 16 lbs.) F. E. Smith, Brown 

J. P. Coombs, Brown 
R. E. Healey, Tufts 



♦New Record. 

t Morgan and Scott tied. 



20 ft. 5 1-2 in. 

. 20 ft. 1-2 in. 

19 ft. 5 1-2 in. 

*5 ft. 9 3-4 Jn- 
. . 5 ft. 8 in. 

. . 5 ft. 6 in. 

10 ft. 8 3-4 in. 
. . 10 ft. o in. 

'i tioft. 3in. 

*38 ft. 6 1-2 in. 

38 ft. I 1-2 in. 

• • 35 ft- 8 in. 

133 ft. 8 in. 

108 ft. 2 in. 

. . . 103 ft. 



The point is divided. 



gUMMHRY OF POINTS. 





Dart. 


Brown. 


Am. 


Bow. 


Wes. 


Trin. 


M. I.T. 


Tufts. 


w. p. I 


loO' Vard Dashy 


4 


5 























22O' Tard Dash^ 





5 


3 


I 

















440- Vard Dash, 


I 





3 











5 








880' Vard Run, 


6 





3 




















One- Mile Run, 


5 





I 





3 














Two-Mile Run, 





3 





I 


5 














One-Mile Walh, 





4 


5 




















Two-Mile Bicycle^ 


5 

















I 


3 





120- Ta rd Hu rdle , 


5 





I 


3 

















220- Tard Hurdle y 


5 





I 


3 

















Broad Jump, 


6 








3 

















^'S^A J**^P^ 








I 








8 











Pole Vault, 


3 





h 





5 











h 


i6-lb. Shot, 





3 


I 


5 

















j6-lb. Hammer, 





8 

















I 





Totals, 


40 


28 


r^ 


16 


13 


8 


6 


4 


h 



Winners of the (Championship. 



1887. Dartmouth. 

1888. Amherst. 

1889. Dartmouth. 

1890. Amherst. 

1891. Amherst. 



1892. Amherst. 

1893. Dartmouth. 

1894. M. I. T. 

1895. Dartmouth. 

1896. Dartmouth. 



i?3 




Aivtn /10|[( ^aej /l^rri) /loujt 



^ 




^SC^md: 



\im. 




Manager. 


Julius Nolth. 


TEAM. 


Fred Hekry Twombly. 


R0BB8T Allvn. 




WlNFRED Dean >ItlBBARI>. 


Howard Lawrence Bodwel 


L. 


JoHs IIekrv House. 


William Lahamy Butcher. 




Harold Wellington Jones. 


Edward Samuel Chap:n. 




DuRAND Mayer. 


Asa Waters Grosvenor. 




Ralph Rollins Rumerv. 


Ralph Harris. 




Ernest Frank Russ. 



^NNUSL gpRING rV]EETING. 

Irvington OvaU May 27^ 1896. 



EVENT. 

JOO- Varti Dash 



220'l'ard Dash 



4^0- Yard Dash . . . . 



SSo' Yard Run 



One- Mile Run 



Tivo-Mile Run . 



• • 



One-Mile Walk . . . 



120- Yard Hurdle . . . . 



Running Broad Jump 



Running High Jump . . 



Pole Vault 



Pulling Shot (lO'lbs.) . . 



7^h rotving Ha mmer( 16 lbs.) 



* New Record. 



WINNBK8. TIME, HEIGHT, OK DISTANCE. 

A. W. Grosvenor, '98 10 2-5 sec. 

O. II. Gray, *97. 
A. H. PuGH, '97. 

A. W. Grosvenor, '98 "24 2-5 sec. 

A. H. PuGH, '97. 
O. 11. Gray, '97. 

C. B. Stebbins, '97 56 sec. 

A. H. Plgh, '97. 
W. E. West, '99. 

C. B. Stebbins, '97 2 min. 9 2-5 sec. 

F. H. Lathrop, '99. 
II. P. Farnham, '99. 

S. A. Hooker, '97 5 min. 2 sec. 

H. A. B. Campbell, '99. 

R. R. Rl'MERY. '98. 

E. P. Oscjooi). '97 II min. 56 1-5 sec. 

R. R. RUMERY, '98. 

W. E. Reed, '97. 

DuRAND Mayer, '98 . . ^8 min. 2 sec. 

Robert Allyn, '98. 
J. 11. House, '98. 

R. a. Ferguson, '99 >7 3-5 *^ec. 

R. R. RuMERY, '98. 

T. Washburn, '97. 

W. L. Butcher, '98 19 ft. 4 in. 

R. Harris, '98. 
J. NOLTE, '98. 

W. L. Butcher, '98 5 ft. 4 in. 

R. A. Ferguson, '99. 
R. Harris, '98. 

W. L. Butcher, '98 ...... . 9 ft. ^ 1-2 in. 

F. L. H. Kimball, *99. 

E. S. Chapin, '98. 

H. W. Jones, '98 ^5 ft. i in. 

F. L. H. Kimball, '99. 
A. C. LooTz, '96. 

H. W. Jones, '98 82 ft. 11 in. 

A. C. LooTz, *96. 
F. C. Field, '96. 

186 



Irvington Oval, October 24, ^896. 



EVENT. 

Joo-Yard Dash . . . 



WINNERS. 



HANDICAP. 



2 20- Yard Dash 



• • 



440- Yard Dash . . . 



SSo' Yard Run . . . . 



TIME, HEIGHT, OR DISTANCE. 

O. H. Gray, '97, 4^ yards 10 2-5 sec. 

G. P. BuRCii, *99, 4^ yards. 
A. H. PuGii, *97, 4 yards. 

M. W. Hall, *oo, 15 yards 24 sec. 

O. H. Gray, '97, 10 yards. 
A. H. PuGH, '97, 8 yards. 

W. D. Hubbard, *98, 12 yards 55 3*5 sec. 

A. W. Grosvbnor, '98, scratch. 
H. L. Morse, '99, 12 yards. 



H. L. Morse, '99, 25 yards . 
C. B. Stebbins, '97, scratch. 
C. S. High, '98, 35 yards. 



One- Mile Run 



H. L. BoDWELL, *98, 35 yards . . 
H. A. B Campbell, '99, 40 yards. 
S. A. Hooker, '97, scratch. 



2 min. 6 4-5 sec. 



5 min. 6 3-5 sec. 



Two- Mile Run . . . 



Mile Walk 



R. Suter, *oo, 200 yards 11 min. 31 sec. 

E. P. Osgood, *97r8cratch. 
R. R. Rumery, '98, scratch. 

D. Mayer, '98, scratch 8 min. 25 2-5 sec. 

R. Allyn, '98, 20 seconds. 
J. H. House, *98, 40 seconds. 



1 20- Yard Hurdle Race . 



Running Broad Jump . 



Running High Jump 



Pulling Shot (j6 lbs.) 



Throwing Discus 



Class Team Race . . 



R. R. Rumery, '98, scratch . . 
J. F. VVentworth, *oo, scratch. 

A. W. Grosvenor, '98, scratch 
J. H. House, '98, 2 feet . . . 
"W. L. Butcher, '98, 8 inches . 

VV. L. Butcher, '98, 2 inches . 
R. A. Ferguson, '99, scratch 
A. W. Grosvenor, '98, 2 inches 



18 4-5 sec. 



H. W. Jones, '98, scratch . . 
F. L. H. Kimball, '99, 2 feet . 
D. Mayer, '98, 4 feet .... 



*22 ft. I 1-2 in. 

21 ft. 3 1-2 in. 

. . 20 ft. 8 in. 

. . 5 ft. 6 in. 
. . 5 ft. 4 in. 
. 5 ft. I 3-4 in. 



H. W. Jones, '98, scratch 
F. C. Field, '97 . . . 
R. A. Ferguson, '99 . 



'99, Dryer, Sawyer, Burch, West. 
*97, Field, Gray, Pugh, Stebbins. 
•98, Mayer, Nolte, House, Grosvenor. 
*oo, Hall, Emery, Went worth, Priest. 



. . 36 ft. 
35 ft. 8 1-2 in. 
33 ft. 8 1-2 in. 

*93 ft. 8 in. 

75 ft. 2 in. 

. 74 ft. 2 in. 



♦Technology Record. 



187 



PiFTH ^NNUSL (?R0S5-(?0UNTRY T{UU 



FIRST. 

E. P. Osgood, '97. 



♦Xcw Record. 



November % J896. 



SECOND. 

H. B. Mayhew, 'go. 



Time, *28 minutes, 56J seconds. 



188 



clNNUSL Indoor Winter [vIeeting. 

TtcbnologY Gymnasttmit December 12^ \d96* 



EVENT. 

jj- Yard Dash . 



jj- Yard Hurdle 



• • 



WINNERS. 

A. W. Grosvenor, '98 
O. H. Gray, '97. 
G. P. Burch, '99. 

A. W. Grosvenor, '98 
G. P. Burch, '99. 
G. I. Copp, *99. 



TIME, HEIGHT, OR DISTANCE. 

4 1-5 sec. 



5 sec. 



Potato Race 



W. E. Putnam, •98 
A. H. PuGH, *97. 
D. Mayer, *93. 



36 3-5 sec. 



Broad Jump 



E. F. Russ, '98 . . . 
A. W. Grosvenor, '98 
C. S. High, '98 . . . 



High Jump 



Pole Vault . 



W. E. Putnam, '98 . 
W. L. Butcher, '98 
G. P. Burch, ^99 



VV. E. Putnam, '98 . . 

W. L. Butcher. '98 \ ^..^ ^^^ .^^^^^ 
J. Nolte, '98 i 



9 ft. 8 3-4 in. 

9 ft. 8 1-2 in. 

. 9 ft. 5 in. 

5 ft. 7 1-4 in. 
5 ft. 4 1-4 in. 
5 ft. 3 1-4 in 

9 ft. 3 1-2 in. 
9 ft. I 1-2 in. 



Putting Shot {16 lbs.) . 



H. W. Jones, '98 . 
C. S. High, '98 . 

H. L. BODWELL, '98 



. *36 ft. 9 in. 

32 ft. 10 in. 

. . 32 ft. 6 in. 



* New Record. 



189 



gUMMHRY OF POINTS FOR THE (?LflSS (^HHMPIONSHIP 

POR THE (jEflR 1595-96. 



Championship won by the Class of ^8, with 85 points. First place cotmts 5, second 3» 
and third h 



Class of *98 
Class of '97 
Class of '96 
Class of *99 



lOO-Yard Dash 
220- Yard Dash 
440- Yard Dash 
SSo-Yard Dash 
One- Mile Run . 
Two- A file Run . 
One-Mile Walk 
/20- Yard Hurdle 



jj' Yard Dash . 
jj' Yard Hurdle 
Potato Race 
Rope Climb . . 
Fence Vault 











Firsts. Seconds. Thirds 


Totals. 


t 




• 




• 


• 


II 7 


9 




85 






• 




• 


• 


6 5 


6 




51 






• 




• 


• 


4 4 


2 




34 






• 




• 


• 


I 6 


4 




27 










Outdoor Events. 












'98 


•97 


•99 


'96 






•98 


•97 


•99 


•96 


5 


4 








Broad Jump . . 




9 











5 



4 
8 








Hisrh Jumt* 




6 





3 
3 





I 





^ ^h ■ ^^b '^ ^m ^rW WW^ ^ V V V 

Pole Vault . . . 




6 











5 


4 





Putting Shot . . 




5 





3 


I 


I 


5 


3 





Throwing Hantfner 




5 








4 


3 


6 








Cross-Country Run 







4 





5 


9 















— 


— 


— 


— 


3 


I 


5 









57 


37 


22 


10 






Indoor Events. 












•98 


•96 


'97 


•99 






•98 


•96 


•97 


•99 


6 





3 





Broad Jump . . 


• 1 


3 


5 





I 


3 





6 





High Jump . . . 


• I 


X 


5 





3 


4 





5 





Putting Shot . . 


• « 


5 


3 





X 


6 


3 












^— 


^— 


^— 


-^ 





8 












28 


24 


14 


5 



190 



^UMMHRY OF POINTS FOR THE InDIVIBUHL EXCELLENCE (^UP. 



Cup won by Asa Waters Gf osvenoft with 23 points. 



A. W. Grosvenor, '98, 23. 

C. B. Stebbiks, '97, 20. 
W. L. Butcher, '98, 19. 
A. H. Green, '96, 18. 
H. W. Jones, '98, 15. 

R. A. Ferguson, '99, 12. 
O. H. Gray, '97, 7. 
F. L. Kimball, '99, 7. 
A. H. PuGH, '97, 7. 
R. R. Rumbry, *98, 7. 
R. E. Bakenhus, '96, 6. 
E. P. Osgood, '97, 6. 

H. L. BODWELL, '98, 5. 

II. Cummings, '96, 5. 
S. A. Hooker, '97, 5. 

D. Mayer, '98, 5. 



R. Harris, '98, 4. 

A. C. LooTZ, '96, 4. 

R. Allyn, '98, 3. 

H. A. B. Campbell, '99, 3. 

F. H. Lathrop, '99, 3. 

S. F. Wise, '97, 3. 

E. S. Chapin, '98, I. 
H. P. Farnham, *99, I. 

F. C. Field, '96, i. 
J. II. House, '98, i. 

W. D. Hubbard, '98, i. 

J. NOLTE, '98, I. 

W. E. Reed, '97, i. 
E. A. Sumner, '97, i. 
T. Washburn, '97, i. 
W. E. West, '99, i. 



191 



Seventeenth Annual gcRHTCH (James of the 

JS]. I. X Athletic (?lub. 



M. L T, GymnasiuiA, M&rch H, J 896* 



BVBNT. 

jj- Yard Dash (novice) . 
jj- Yard Dash .... 



WINNERS. 

O. H. Gray, M. I. T. . . 
W. E. West, M. I. T. 

A. W. Grosvenor, M. I. T. 
J. T. Roche, H. A. A. 



TIME, HEIGHT, OR DI8TAVCB. 

4 1-5 8ec. 



• • 



. . . ^4 sec. 



40- Yard High Hurdle . 



Running High Jump 



Pole Vault 



. T. P. Curtis, B. A. A 

F. W. Lord, B. A. A. 

W. E. Putnam, H. A. A. and N. A. A. 
E. H. Clark, H. A. A. and B. A. A. 

. W. W. HoYT, H. A. A. and B. A. A. 
E. Atherton, B. A. A. 



5 4-5 sec. 



5 ft. 10 x-4 in. 



10 ft. 4 x-2 in. 



Putting Shot ( lb lbs . ) . 



A. Lovering, H. a. a. 
K. K. KuBLi, H. A. A. 



37 ft. 5 1-4 in. 



Potato Race 



C. B. Stebbins, M. I. T. 
E. L. Pope, B. A. A. 



34 3-5 sec. 



• World's Record made by Grosvenor. 



192 



Technology I^ecords. 



STANDARD EVENTS. 



EVENT. 

too- Yard Dash 

220' Yard Dash 
440- Yard Dash 
88o'Yard Run . 
One-Mile Run . 
Two-Mile Run 
One-Mile Walk 
120- Yard Hurdle 
220- Yard Hurdle 
Two-Mile Bicycle 
Running" Broad Jump 
Ru n n ing High Ju mf> 
Pole Vault .... 
Putting Shot (16 lbs.) 
Throwing Hammer {16 



HOLDER. 



KBCORD. 

R. W. Carr, '95 10 2-5 sec. 

A. W. Grosvenor, *98. 

R. W. Carr, '95 23 sec^ 

J. A. Rockwell, '96 Si 1-5 sec. 

T. Spencer, '91 2 min. 6 2-5 sec. 

G. Clapp, *95 4 min. 37 4-5 sec^ 

S. F. Wise, '97 11 min. 25 4-5 sec. 

D. Mayer, '98 8 min. 2 sec. 

B. HuRD, '96 16 3-5 sec. 

B. HuRD, '96 26 1-5 sec» 

W. C. Marmon, *95 5 min. 26 4-5 sec. 

A. W. Grosvenor, '98 22 ft. i 1-2 in. 

C. D. IIeywood, *93 6 ft. 1-2 in. 

J. Crane, Jr., '92 10 ft. 7 in. 

II. W. Jones, '98 36 ft. 9 in. 

lbs.) C. H. Parker, '95 96 ft. 4 in. 



EVENT. 

20- Yard Dash . . 
j^-Yard Dash . . . 
J J- Yard Low Hurdle 
Potato Race .... 
Cross Country Run 
Class Team Race . . 
Standing Broad Jump 



Standing High Jump 
Pence Vault 
Running High Kick . 
Rope Climb .... 
Throwing Discus . . 



SPEQAL EVENTS, 

HOLDEK. RECORD. 

F. W. Lord, '94 3 sec. 

A. W. Grosvenor, '98 *4 sec. 

B. HuRD, Jr., '96 44-5 sec. 

J. A. Rockwell, Jr., *96 50 1-5 sec. 

E. P. Osgood, '97 28 min. 56 3-5 sec. 

Class of '94 3 min. 18 sec. 

L. Burnett, '96 10 ft. i 1-2 in. 



Three Standing Broad Jumps E. A. Boeseke, '95 32 ft. 8 1-8 in. 



F. R. Young, '86 ... 4 ft. 10 in. 

A. H. Green, '96 7 ft. 2 1-4 in. 

C. D. Heywood, *93 9 ft. 3 1-2 in. 

H. L. BoDWELL, '98 52-5 sec. 

II. W.Jones, '98 93 ft. 8 in. 



• World's Record. 



194 



HeCORDS of the (^EW J^NGLflNtl 

Intercollegiate ^thletic Association. 



EVENT. 


RECORD. 


HOLDER. 


too- Yard Dash . . 


. . . 10 1-5 sec. 


H. S. Patterson . 


220- Yard Dash . . 


. . . 22 3-5 sec. 


H. C. Idk . . . . 


440-Yard Dash . . 


. . . 50 1-5 sec. 


G. B. Shattuck 


880- Yard Run . . 


. . 2 min. I 2-5 sec. 


H. L. Dadmun . . 


One-Mile Run . . 


. . 4 min. 32 1-5 sec. 


G. 0. Jarvis . . . 


Two- Mile Run . , 


. . 10 min. 8 2-5 sec. 


G. 0. Jarvis . . . 


One-Mile Walk . , 


. 7 min. 15 3-5 sec. 


H. F. Houghton . 


Two-Mile Bicycle 


. 5 min. 27 4-5 sec. 


W. C. Marmon . . 


120- Yard Hurdle . . 


• . • IS 3-5 sec. 


d. ^HASB . . . • 


220- Yard Hurdle . . 


. . . . 26 sec. 


H. C. Ide . . . . 


Running Broad Jum} 


b , . . 22 ft. 3 in. 


S. Chase . . . . 


Running High Jump 


• • 5 ft. 9 3-4 in. 


I. K. Baxter . . . 


Pole Vault . . . . 


. . . 10 ft. 9 in. 


H. L. Towne . . 


Putting Shot (rb lbs,. 


; . . 38 ft. 6 1-2 in. 


E. R. Godfrey . . 


Throwing Hammer ( 


/6 lbs.) 133 ft. 8 in. 


F. E. Smith . . . 



COLLEGE ANI> DATE. 

. Williams, 1895. 

Dartmouth, 1892. 

Amherst, 1891. 

. Worcester, 1891. 

. Wesleyan, 1893. 

. Wesleyan, 1893. 

Amherst, 1894. 

M. I. T., 1894. 

Dartmouth, 1895. 

Dartmouth, 1892. 

Dartmouth, 1895. 

. . Trinity, 1896. 

. Wilh'ams, 1892. 

Bowdoin, 1896. 

. . Brown, 1896. 



"95 



WORLD'S ^MaiEUR !^BCORt)S. 



STANDARD EVENTS. 



EVENT. 

lOO-Yard Dash 



RECORD. 



HOLDER. 



PLACE AND DATE. 



r. A c s«.r / J«"^ Owen, Jr. . Washington, 1890 
9 4-5 sec. I g J Wefers . Berkeley Oval, 1896 



220-Yard Dash 21 1-5 sec. B. J. Wefers . Berkeley Oval, 1896 

440-Yard Dash ( straight azvay) ^'j y^ sec. Wendel Baker . . . Boston, 1S86 

^So-Yard Dash . . . i min. 53 2-5 sec. C. H. Kilpatrick, New York City, 1895 

. 4 min. 15 3-5 sec. T. P. Conneff . New York City, 1895 



One- Af tie Run . 

T-vo-Mile Run 
One-Mile Walk 
120- Yard Hurdle 
220- Yard Hurdle 



. 9 min. 17 2-5 sec. W. G. George 
. 6 min. 29 3-5 sec. F. P. Murray 
. . . 152-5 sec. 
... 24 3-5 sec. 



S. Chase . 
J. L. Bremer 



Runnin/r Broad Jump . . 23 ft. 6 1-2 in. \ p' „' p-^ 



• • 



England, 1884 

New York City, 1883 

Travers Island, 1895 

Berkeley Oval, 1894 



Detroit, 1891 
England 



Running High Jump 



• • 



6 ft. 5 5-8 in. M. F. Sweeney . New York City, 1895 



Pole Vault lift. 5 3-8 in. W. S. Rodenbaugh, Philadelphia, 1892 

Putting Shot ( 16 lbs.) 47 ft* G. R. Gray .... Chicago, 1893 

Throwing Hammer (16 lbs.) 145 ft. 3-4 in. J. S. Mitchell . Travers Island, 1892 



196 



^. 1. T- Football ^IssocmiioN. 



OFFICERS* 



Prf.si(/enf. 
Howard Agnew Noble, '97. 

Vice President. Secretary-Treasurer, 

Ralph Spelman Whiting, '97. Ernest Frank Russ, '98. 

Captain. 
Frank Edward Underwood, *97. 

Executive G>mmittee* 

Herbert Page Beers, '97. 

George Frederick Ulmer, '98. 

George Rogers Heckle, '99. 

Manager of Team. 
Augustus Clark Lamb, '97. 



197 







~l 




October 
October 
October I 
October i 
October a 



GAMES. 

Technology r/.i. Exeier, m Eseier . 
Technology n. Colby, al Boston 
Technology v.". Campello, at CampcNo 
Technology vs. Trinity, at Hartford 
Technology ij. Tufts, at MeJford . 

Gnmee played 



W. K. Fairbanks, '97. 
F. N. Le Baron, '97. 

E. B. MCCORMICK. ''^7. 

F. E. Underwood. "97. 
W, J. Waltubr, '97. 
E. C. Embrv. -98. 

Jl. A HUPKINS, '9S. 



F. E. Masskield, -98. 

W. G. MCCONNHLL, '98. 

G. F. Ulmkr, ■98. 
C. W. Wilder, -98. 
G. R. IIkcklb. '99. 
P. B. Sanciiei!, '99. 




?^l 






tlorrison l/ogl Ealon IJIdte Jutls 5<ltiiuelj Jlocupib 
ionie lollidoy /limTiari 



tv^ 



i 




Crf/Af.n. 
Kknnbtm M. Blake. 



Manager. 
Grorce I. Cupp. 



Timothy W. Uoxie, Right End. 
Hbnrv S. Eaton, Righl Tackle. 
William W. Slocum, Rii;ht Guard. 
Richard C. Harrison. Center. 
Frank F. Fowle, Left Giinrd. 

Jam:e D. Ma< 



TEAM. 

G&URUE I. Copp, Left Tackle. 
Dean Hinman. Left End. 
Kes-neth M. Blakb, Quarter Back. 
Edwin T. Samubls, Right Half Back. 
Robert A. Pbrgusom, Lei't Half Back. 
Bridb, Full Back. 



Albxanuek R. Hoi 
John L, Tufts. 
Edward R. Ror.so: 



R G. VOOT. 
VIN Ulke. 
s H. Walto; 



SCHEDULE OF GAMES. 

October 2\. Technology "99 vs. Medford tUgh School . 

October 3[. Terhnologjr '99 vs. Needham A. A. . 

November n, Tt-dinologv '99 :■,<. Tiifts '99 . . . 

November 16. Teclinologv '99 i-j. Technology 1900 . 




/•a/yiiKind'TucJt-Croije/l •/i'ciixrtb Oepeii!ie/i2i-'<(:iflij rAin 




Cafitaiu. 
Wallace J. Paget. 



Robert P. Ruberts. 



Charles B. Cotting, Right End. 
Robert E. Oj-penheim, Right Tackle. 
Arthur A. Reimer, Right Guard. 
S. Berwick Miller, Center. 
William J. Anuls, Left Guard. 



llBNRV D. Jbwett, Left Tackle. 
Geueoe W. Knight, Left End. 
Nathan D. Whitman, Quarter Back, 
Claude U. Gilson, Righi Half Back. 
Wallace J. Paget. Left 1 lalf Back. 



Frank De M. Gage, Full Bnck, 



TiteouuRE C. Tuck. 



William R. Hurd. 

Russell P. Priest. 
Sullivan W. Jones. 



October 1%. 
October 3 1 . 
November 7. 
November 10. 

November 16. 



Technology 'c 
Technology' 'c 



SCHEDULE OF GAMES. 

'00 ij. Thajer Academy 
'00 IM. Haverhill High School 
I. Milton Athletics 
!. Tufts, '00 . . , 







c^<j J e Lhcteriijood J)eiaao Croi,iell /Xufiitg /^i^'/'M 




^s 



-^^L^. 



CapiaiH. 
Earlb Caldwell 



Walter Gusi 



TEAM. 
ULius N»LTe, I'itcher. 
Morris Francis Delano. Pitcher. 
Jamks Saxtun Barber. Catcher. 

Earlr Caldwell Emerv. Firel Base. 

Frank Erastus Makspield, Second Base. 
James Fred Muhlig. Third Base. 

Edgar Warren Norton, Short Stop. 
Jbssb Branch HchbarI}, Left Fields 
Charles Frederic Wing. Center 
LuTKER Alberto Crowell, Ri 



, Second Base 
ON Chase. Jr.. Pitcher and Field. 
Ralph Tlicker Horton, Short Stop and Field. 
Charles Frankl:n S.mitii, Field. 



SCHEDULE OF GAMES. 

April 8. Technology '98 vi. Hopkinson H-'4 

April II. Technology '98 vs. Roxburj' Latin School ii-ii 

April 15. Technology '98 vs. Newton High School 13-6 

April 18, Technology "gS t'.-. Ronbury High School 10-6 

April 21. Technology '93 i-j. Mopkinson 14-0 

April 17. Technology '98 vi. Harvard '99 9-15 

April 29. Technology '9S rj. Exeter Academy 3-9 

May 4. Technology '98 vs.. Brookline High School 5-3 

May 6. Technology "98 3'.<. Grolon School 16-14 

May 8. Technology 'yS vs. Somerville High 5-13 

May II. Technology '98 r'J. Cambridge High and Latin .... 19-S 

May ao. Technology '98 vs. Technology "99 15-8 






v^'-^ 



■^ :^%- 



w 


Holibri 


J<5bij^9ni C?PF 


'^S/'? 


<^? 


t)urch teyi 


v^eU Vocjt Hc^rae 


<^> 


'M 


^larwp°d 


Shcmll 


^M 







OFFICERS. 

Caflaia. Manager. 

Harrv MoNTifix Keys. Mkrlk Wkeks. 

TEAM. 

Harry Montifix Kbvs Pitcher and Second Base. 

George Irving Copp Catcher. 

Lane Johnson FirBt Base. 

Robert Grant Holabird Second Baie Knd Pitcher. 

Miles Standish Sherrill Third Baee. 

Oscar Gburgb Vogt Shortstop. 

Guy Prentiss Burch Left Field. 

Joseph Louis Hern Center Field. 

Charles Frank Harwood Right Field. 

SubEtituto. 

Edward Allen Keys. 

Duncan Crawford McLean. 

Henry Kimbbrly Babcock. 

Edward Everett Piekce. 



SCHEDULE OF GAMES. 

April 35. Technology '91) r'.t. Brown '99 5-16 

April sS. Technology '99 vs. Cambridge Latin 3-7 

May I. Technology '99 fj. Roxbury High School ..... lo-il 

May 3. Technology '99 f,<. Tufts (second nine) 5-30 

May 16. Technology "99 i>.t. Arlington High School 10-17 

May 20. Technology '99 I'l. Technology 'yS 9-16 




^1. 1. X Tennis ^IssociaiioN. 



Prrsideiit. 
Van Ren'sselaer Lans 



Vice PrrsideH/. 
Harold Osgood Ayeh. '99. 



Secrctary-Trcnsn 
Charles Burton Gii 



Executive Committee. 



Asa Waters Gsosvi 



Guv Prentiss Burlh, "99. 

Gerald Basil Stf 



MEMBERS* 



H. W. Allen, '97. 

H. O. Ayrr, '99. 

F. N. Le Baron, '97. 

E. B. Baumann, '97. 
L. D. W. Bender, '99. 

F. M. Blake, '98. 
W. D. Bradley, '97. 
W. Brewster, '98. 

G. P. BuRCH, '99. 
M. F". Delano, '98. 
M. F. Evven, '97. 
W. C. Ewing, '97. 

W. K. Fairbanks, '97. 
R. M. Ferris, '97. 
F. Furbish, '97. 
C. B. GiLLsoN, '99. 
R. Gilpin, '99. 
A. W. Grosvenor, '98. 
H. W. Hathaway, '97. 
R. G. Holabird, '99. 
S. L. Howard, '97. 
F. W. Howe. I. 
A. W. Jackson, '97. 
H. W.Jones, '98. 



F. W. Krisker, *97. 
R. E. Kendall, '98. 
V. R. Lansing H, '98. 

R. D. MOMMERS, '98. 

W. Page, '97. 
J. W. Phelan, I. 
H. H. Riddle, '99. 
S. W. Riddle, *99. 
M. F. Richardson, '99. 
W. A. Robinson, *98. 
E. F. Russ, '98. 
R. E. Sawyer, *97. 

E. R. Sheak, '99. 
J. F. Sickman, '98. 
A. D. Spiess, *97. 
J. Stone, Jr., '99. 

G. B. Street, *99. 

F. R. Swift, '99. 
E. M. Taylor, '98. 

G. W. Treat, '98. 

G. R. Wads worth, '98. 
T. Washburn, '97. 
E. A. Weimer, '98. 
C.-E. A. WiNSLow, *98. 



The spring tournament was held on the grounds of the Association, May, 1896. 

Final Round. — Allen Winchester Jackson, '97, beat Malcolm Faulkner 
EwEN, '97. 



The fall tournament was held on the grounds of the Association, October, 1896. 
Final Round. — Harold Osgood Ayer, '99, beat Van Rensselaer Lansingh, '98. 



209 







OrgafiiMd November H, 18%. 





Stcrrlary- Treasurer. 


W. Grosvenoh, 


V, R. Lansingh. 


MEMBERS. 


W. J. Angus. 


C. S. High, 


R. E. Bakeniius. 


J. H. House. 


J. H. BATCltELLHR. 


G. G. Hutchinson. 


11. L. BODWELL. 


H. W, Jones. 


W. Brrwster. 


A. S. Keene. 


G. p. BuRcii. 


F. H. Lathrop. 


W. L. Butcher, 


D. Mayer. 


E. R. Bitter WORTH. 


G. C. Muslon. 


II. A. B. Cami-bell. 


H. 11, Mavhew. 


L. A, Croweli- 


H. M. McMasters. 


P. B. COOI-ER. 


H. L. Morse. 


G. F. DoTV. 


C. E. Osgood. 


. J. F. Everett. 


A. H. PUGH. 


I M. F. EwEN. 


J. C. R.ELLV. 


"' W. B. Flynn. 


E. W. RiTCiriE. 


A. B. Foote. 


E. H. Sciiroei>er. 


C. B. GlLLSnN. 


J. S. Smvser. 


H. L. Grant. 


H. H. Sullivan. 


D. E. Gray. 


J, F. Wentworth. 


A. W. Gbosvenor, 


W, E, West. 


M, W. Hall. 


J. F. Wessel. 



First Run, November n, "96, from Clarendon Hills. Course, 8 Miles. 
Second Run, November 11, '96, from Newton. Course, 11 Miles. 
Third Run, Decembers. '96. from Belmont. Course, 6 Milee. 
Fourth Run, January :, '97, from Arlington Heights. Course 8 Mites. 



£fe=. 




Class ot 1899 vs. CUs! of 1900. 
Score, 19 to 19. 




TilUam MonUguc HalL 



WlLLiaM rV^ONiaGUE IJSLL. 



WILLIAM MONTAGUE HALL was bom in Newton, Massachusetts, 
February 14, 1877. The greater part of his life was spent in 
his native city, where he attended successively Miss Wilkins* 
School, the Bigelow Grammar School, and the Newton High School. 
Throughout all the length of his preparatory courses he showed a fond- 
ness for study, ranked well in his classes, mastered his lessons easily and 
quickly and found plenty of time to devote to his boyish hobbies. 

Though younger than many of his companions, his youthful foresight 
and level headedness won their confidence, and, combined with his popu- 
larity, made him their tacitly acknowledged chief. 

His interest in military affairs in his younger days caused him to or- 
ganize the boy company that Newton residents so well remember,— the 
Hunnewell Cadets,— which he captained throughout its existence, and 
which, if it lasted too short a time to admit of a perfect understanding 
of tactics by its members, certainly left no doubt in their minds as to its 
leader's proficiency as a disciplinarian. Later, although interested in ath- 
letics in general, he was especially devoted to aquatics and became a 
member of the Newton Boat and the Wabawawa Canoe Clubs. 

Aware that his early fondness for boats and machinery was constantly 
increasing, young Hall decided upon a technical career, and, with this end 
in view, he entered Cutler's School, in Newton, to prepare for the Insti- 
tute. He passed his entrance examinations in 1894, became a member of 
Course XII!., '98, and threw himself heartily into his work and the af- 
fairs of his class and college. His ability as a speaker and an organizer 
was speedily recognized during the first few chaotic meetings of his fel- 
low Freshmen, and gained him his election as their first president. 

From the beginning his popularity steadily grew, for his frank and 
cordial manner, coup!ed with his fearlessness in debate, appealed strongly 

213 



to his classmates. Hall came from the preparatory schools with the two- 
fold determination which inspires every representative Technology man, — 
of taking his degree in his chosen course, and of adding to his profes- 
sional knowledge everything which he felt could tend to ** round him out." 
He was a constant reader of the scientific papers, and took great interest 
in history and biography. He possessed remarkable powers of concentra- 
tion, and seemed to be able to read or study regardless of the fact that 
even the very room in which he sat might be full of noisy comrades. 
He was a keen observer, and, indeed, as his father once said of him, '* He 
seemed to be constantly storing up knowledge for future use." 

Hall was initiated into the Fraternity of Phi Beta Epsilon in his Fresh- 
man year, served on the Institute Committee for two years, was secretary 
and treasurer of the 'Varsity Baseball Association during the year 1895- 
1896, and was elected a member of the executive committee of the 
Tennis Association and of the Technology Yacht Club. Election to an 
office in a Freshman class at Technology is indicative of a man's good 
fortune in being able to create a favorable impression upon his fellow- 
classmen, rather than of his ability to render them efficient service, and 
Hairs re-election to the presidency of Ninety-eight in her Sophomore 
year was a significant compliment. 

Early in October, 1895, Hall became a member of the editorial staff 
of The Tech, and shortly afterwards took charge of the Athletic Depart- 
ment of the paper. His interest in class affairs in no way abated, nay, — 
it increased ; for throughout his second year he labored constantly for the 
unity of Ninety -eight, and she in turn, in the spring, renewed her faith 
in him by giving him her solid vote for the Electoral Committee of 
TECHNIQUE; and had his life been spared he would have been the Society 
Editor of this volume. 

The Institute had hardly closed last year when Hall began to get his 
cutter into readiness for a cruise along the coast of Maine. The Daisy 
went into commission while lying off City Point, on Thursday, the 
eighteenth of June, and a short time after the ensign and the burgee 
of the Technology Yacht Club were hoisted, Hall fell from the rigging 
to the deck, so fatally injured that his death occurred on the follow- 
ing day. 

214 



His sudden end was indeed a severe blow to his fellow-workers; the 
Junior year of Ninety-eight was entered upon with mingled feelings of 
sadness and helplessness; and even now, although nearly another college 
year has passed away, it seems almost inconceivable that they can never 
again in this life see his face and hear his voice. 

Ambitious and enthusiastic, he gained their attention ; manly and a 
natural leader, he commanded their respect ; generous and sympathetic, 
he won their love; honest and faithful in all things, holding noble ideals, 
ever ready to champion his family and his friends, — such was he who 
was endeared to upper and lower classmen alike, and known to all the 
college as "Billy" Hall, 

S. L. H. 





HE ARCHITECTVRAL SVM- 
MER SCHOOL ABROAD .: 



WITH throbbing hearts and groined vaulted yells the two divisions 
of the illustrious twenty -one started for the Old World: the North 
Wing leaving June 3d, on the palatial cattle steamer Cestrian; 
the South Wing risking their lives on one of the Cunard boats. The 
weather was good, but grew a little rough at times, causing the bright- 
eyed youths to stand by the rail and view with flashing orbs and heaving 
lower chest the mighty waves as they passed under the ship. Some people 
enjoy the sea ; others would give as high as $7.}2 to be ashore. 

After a very rapid (?) passage, the three thousand sheep, eight hundred 
cattle, two professors, and eight students were landed at Liverpool. Several 
days were spent in going to London, Chester and Oxford being visited en 
route. At the metropolis the shattered remains of the second division were 
embraced. Five days were then spent in London, but to describe what was 
seen would necessitate a cold and very lengthy crib from the guidebook, — 
and six weeks. London appears to the person who sees it for the first 
time as overpoweringly large. It seems a hopeless undertaking to try and 
"sight-see" the place in five days; but this task was accomplished in 
quite a thorough manner by the party. Four days were spent in wheeling 
to Southampton by the way of Hampton Court, Esher, Guildford, Ripley, 
Godalmung, Compton, Elstead, Waverly Abbey, Farnham, Arlesford, Win- 
chester, Salisbury, and other flag stations. Besides seeing very picturesque 
bits of architecture, two good cathedrals and some good half-timber work, 
the students acquired an acute knowledge of how to mend tires, play 
English billiards, and dance with English barmaids. 

The trip across the Channel was very quiet, and the bicycle tour in 
France was started from Havre the morning of the 25th. Many wild and 



*The Editors wish to disclaim all responsibility for the English of this article. It was written by a 
Course IV. man and is printed intact. 

217 



pathetic attempts were made at the language, the most picturesque forms 
of which appeared in Jackson's stock phrases: "Ferme{ la porte,* and 
"Avei-vous un crayon,'' which, on being hurled at the inhabitants, reaped 
great reward and renown, — also a few bricks. 

From Havre, the route lay through Lillebonne, Caudebec and Jumi^ges, 
to Rouen. At the latter place the Cathedral of Notre Dame, the Palais de 
Justice, the Jean d'Arc Statue, and many other very interesting monu- 
ments and buildings were seen. Considerable time was also spent in hunt- 
ing down a dictionary. From Rouen the party wheeled through Elbeuf 
and Berney. Some of the fellows were lost before reaching the latter place, 
and, through the ignorance (?) of the peasants, had to spend a day or 
so scorching up and down the map of France finding their grief -stricken 
comrades. The next town was Lisieux, at which place some of the stu- 
dents found their reports from Tech., and many a tooth was gnashed, 
Lisieux proved very interesting with quaint narrow streets and a good cathe- 
dral. The costumes of the men peasants consisted of a navy blue night- 
gown and a pair of shrimp pink socks, one end of which was covered by 
wooden shoes, or apses, of the gothic construction. The ladies wore 
bloomers besides the above. 

The next places visited were Creve Coeur and Caen, at the latter of 
which was a good cathedral, with a beautiful renaissance tower. Ba- 
yeux, St. Lo, Contances, Granville, Ouvrances, and Mont St. Michels 
were the next in order. At the first place the party felt its inability to 
make enough noise, it being the Fourth of July. At the last town so 
many points of interest presented themselves that the day and a half so 
generously allowed seemed very short. It would be impossible to describe 
St. Michels here, even in the briefest manner. Foug^res, Vitri, Argentri, 
Chateau Gontier and Angers were then passed through. At Angers the 
party witnessed the French celebration of the 14th of July, — the anni- 
versary of the fall of the Bastile. After Angers came Saumur, the West 
Point of France, Chinon and Azay le Rideau. The party arrived at the 
latter place in time to see a wild -eyed Frenchman smash into a wall. 
It was the same old story,— trying to coast around a very acute angle, 
bounded on three and one-half sides by knife-edged stone walls, the prob- 
lem being to go in and out of the same opening without nicking it ; also 

218 



without meeting death. We picked up the hash that was once the French- 
man, and went our way with tears on our faces. 

At Azay le Rideau is one of the most perfect examples of renaissance 
work in France. Loches, the following town, was also fraught with inter- 
est on account of the dungeons and queer little church, and also on account 
of the use of a set of brass hand instruments, hired for a certain occasion. 

Chenenceaux, another beautiful chateau, was visited ; then came Amboise, 
Blois, and Chamboid. After leaving the Loire Valley the party struck for 
Paris, stopping at Chartres and Versailles; and at Paris broke up — that is, 
not quite broke, but pretty near it. To describe thb trip in such limited 
space necessitates the leaving out of details which are of frenzied interest 
to some of the pilgrims. One of these details, about which the air was gen- 
erally blue, was the puncturing of a tire as the rest of the party was dis- 
appearing over the brow of a neighboring mountain! At such times man 
does not wish to be entirely alone, but yearns to hit some animate object 
with a large brick. 

The stays in Paris were of varied lengths, being in direct proportion to 
the number of plunks ; this law holds up to the breaking point, after which 
the tourist eables for money. However, everyone had time for at least a 
glimpse at the most important points of interest. Too much credit and 
thanks cannot be given to Professor Homer, who was the originator of the 
trip. The admirable way in which it was planned, and the careful personal 
attention he gave to its requirements, were altogether successful in making 
■of the tour a most enjoyable, as well as instructive outing. 




4 



The Technology (^lub. 



HAD known Mathews at home, before he went to Yale and 1 
came to Technology, and he had always given me a hearty wel- 
come whenever I passed through New Haven. I was very much 
pleased, therefore, when he turned up in Boston for the Harvanj- 
Princeton game. We watched the downfall of the Crimson 
together, and then I took him to the Club for dinner. He was 
duly impressed by the crisp English steward, and by the distinguished 
company al some of the little tables in the dining room, where professors, 
alumni, and undergraduates were seated together indiscriminately. He 
failed to recognize Dr. Tyler at first as the full back of the Faculty foot- 
ball team in the '96 Technique, because his beard was at that time under 
its biennial eclipse ; but 
when the Secretary asked 
me some question across 
the table about the game, 
he looked rather awed, 
and whispered, " What a 
jolly, friendly footing 
you're on with your pro- 
fessors at Tech." 

After dinner, when I 
took him upstairs and 
presented him to Profes- 
sor Sedgwick, Mathew's 
Yale arrogance began to 

show visibly. The long "Common Room" was looking its best. A 
bright lire sparkled on the hearth and cast a flickering light on the 
walls, with their clear engravings and soft water colors. The fine full 




length of President Rogers over the fireplace seemed to look benignantly 
down upon us. The old football championship banner, won by Tech- 
nology in 1887 and tS88, hung in front of the bookcase, and testified 
to past athletic greatness. 

I was dilating a little upon the advantages of a technial training to the 
eye and hand, and as I heard the click of billiard balls upstairs 1 took 
Mathews up, to show him what we could do in that line. We found a 
young graduate and a professor " pounding the ivories," and 1 was able to 
demonstrate with clearness the advantages of a knowledge of angles and 

the elasticity of sol- 
ids. We looked into 
the pretty little libra- 
ry, where Vandyke's 
horrible dissection 
picture unpleasantly 
suggests the Biological 
department, and into 
the quiet card room, 
where a game, pre- 
sumably Old Maid, 
was in progress. 

" How was all this 
done .'" Mathews 
asked, when we were once more in our armchairs near the fire with our 
cigars pufling merrily. 

" Public spirit on the part of old grads and some of the profs," I 
replied. "The scheme was first suggested in the executive committee of 
the Alumni last January, and in six months it was carried through. Of 
course they keep the control mostly in their own hands; only sixty out 
of the six hundred members can be undergraduate at present, and those 
are Seniors or very distinguished men, like Editors of Technique. This 
tone of old-world respectability has its drawbacks ; for instance, you cannot 
get anything io drink more inspiring than pasteurized milk — but we rather 
like it. The dignity, I mean, not the milk. The fare you have sampled; 
the billiard table is new and lively ; the bedrooms which one can get for 




the night are cozy ; and the smoke-talks and informal metting:s of various 
kinds have been very successful. But I telephoned for some seats at the 
Castle Square before dinner, and as it's eight o'clock now we'd better 
start." 

" I've heard that you Tech men hadn't any college spirit, but I think 
this Club shows a good deal." said Mathews, as we stepped out into the 
brisk night air. 





•I I I I I I 1 I I I I 
I I 1 I I I I 1 I 1 1 I" 

— '■ Theory of Expression," by Arl- b 



C. R'SsM-w, 'i>y : "Now, I9tx>, suppose you should e1 

Innocent C- -1'-r, igoo : " Out of [he hule, I suppose." 



I 10 dig a hole straight 



VERY QUEER. 

il. Th-mps-n, -gS, 



And yet "lis true, oh, cruel Fate! 
1[!b mind must quick " De Kay." 



"Hard, isn't it.' 
-Ju. 



, '98 (after finishing a translation which needed considerable assistance) : 




Processor M-rr-lli "Now I wlll^devote ■ few minutes to the discuision of my 
last lecture. Any questions?" 

W-LL-C-. '98 ; " Was there any special point you wished to bring out in the last 
lecture, Profeseor M-rr-ll?" 




•98Burrine Gfouod. 



A SUGGESTION. 



Thk F--NC- Mission Band: To spread throughout Technology loving seeds of 
kindness and Kcn'lcness of spirit, as exemplified in our adored and worehiped idol. 



Mr. P- -hs-n ; '• What is the universal negation ?' 
C-RT-s, "98: "Unprepared." 




N-LT-'S E-LS THIS FALL. 

Broken arm (t), sprained leg (4), cold (68), strained leg 
(17). neck (7). brain (o), sore foot (ii), feet (g), tired (1,137), 
consumption (3J)t last stages (i), Eore toes (11). wrenched 
hand (87), foot (tig), bruises (1,373 o' 4)- fractured kneecap 
(I), water on the knee (5), nose broken (i), teeth knocked out 
(31), etc., etc.. flrf <■»/?»//««. 



Profbssor B-kt-m : " The Comstock is the holiest mine that I know of. There 
may be hotter ones, but I do not know anj'thing about them," 



HEAT NOTES. 
Specific Heat op "97 TBCHNiqut. 

H'. /. r.=o. 



s»S 




Button, whose*! giot a Button." 



AS WE SUPPOSED. 

Professor S-dgw-ck (in Botany): *'Why! this is the easiest thing in the 
world. You don't have to know anything to know this; that's why I am teaching it 
to you." 



IN THE NURSERY. 
Professor L-nz- : "Mr. Br-mh-11, you may take the cradle. 



«> 





SECOND SIGHT. 

C. W. P-ND-LL : " Am iN IT? 



DRESS REFORM. 

Professor P-p- : *' Now you must all provide yourselves 
with overalls for this laboratory work" (noticing a blushing: 
Co-ed), **or aprons, as the case may be.' 



»» 



**THE SPIRIT OF n(>r 

Professor R-pl-y (in Taxation) : '* Where are the other members of this class .^ 
We can't have ' taxation without representation.' 



I »» 



ATHLETICS AT M. L T. 

"The M. I. T. Athletic Association held the 
most exciting meeting in its history on the 
thirteenth of March. Mr. A. W. Grosvenor, 
after a hot fight, was chosen President. In 
the contest for Vice President Mr. Asa W. 
Grosvenor came out ahead. The balloting 
for Secretary ran very close, but Mr. A. 
Waters Grosvenor had the best of it. Mr. 
Asa Waters Grosvenor was elected Treasurer. 
It is said that a large body of voters had 
agreed upon the nominees elected before the 
meeting, 



227 



»» 



98 



THE WRECH. 



V.;":. ■■■^•■■•.•.■■::.- ■ 







'73. Mrs. Professor EU-n H. R-ch- 
-rds, having duly reached the time limit, 
was admitted to the Faculty at the May 
meeting. It is unfortunate, however, 
that Professor B-t-s could not conscien- 
tiously abide the decision, and remain 
with us. 

'77. Ex-Professor F- -nc-, who left 
M. I. T. under such unfortunate cir- 
cumstances, has just sailed for China, 
where he goes as a missionary to Chin 
Whiz. His religious fervor and gentle- 
ness of manner will undoubtedly endear 
him to all the natives. 

'84. Dr. Tyl-r's new book, " Liquid 
Entertainments," has already passed 
through forty-seven editions, and is 
now entering upon a period of oblivion. 
He anticipates an elementary edition. 

? J-ck P-ch-n returns next year to 
take Applied, and hopes to graduate 
with *5. His book, " A History of M. 
I. T. since its Foundation, by the Old- 
est Resident," is intensely interesting, 
owing to the endearing personal remi- 
niscences of the better known profes- 
sors. 

'96. Mr. B-nj-m-n H-rd has recently 
taken charge of the Roxbury Distillery, 



which has gone into liquidation. He 
hopes to bring it through by methods 
learned while at M. I. T. 

'97. The Rev. (;-org- H. McC-rthy 
has accepted a call to a fashionable 
New York church, where his suave and 
genial manners will doubtless make him 
unusually popular. 

'97. Mr. K-nd-ll F- -rb-nks has re- 
cently become connected with the Gas 
Works. He is said to be doing ex- 
tremely well. 

'97. Mr. H. D. H-nt's new play, 
" Mamie's Secret," will be produced the 
coming week by the " Daisy Whooper 
International Burlesque Company," di- 
rect from London, at the Howard. Mr. 
H-nt*s success has been phenomenal. 
At present he is engaged in writing an 
operetta, to be brought out at the 
Nickelodeon soon. 

*97. Mr. Schw-rtz has lately joined 
the Real Estate Exchange. We hope 
his transactions will be more frequent 
than when at M. I. T. 

'98. Mr. E. H. F-g-rty has arrived 
home from his course on the Marjorie. 
She has proven herself much swifter 
than her maker. 

'98. Mr. O. A. H-tch-ns-n was re- 
cently elected Alderman from the 17th 
Ward of South Boston. Mr. H-tch-n- 
s-n*s ability is unsurpassed as a politi- 
cian. 



228 



THE \A^RECH. 



99 



*98. Mr. Ev-r-tt N. C-rt-s, who stud- 
ied for law after leaving the Institute, 
has gone upon the stage, and is making 
a great success in '* The Witty Gen- 
eral." The lady who supports him is 
charming. 

'98. A quiet wedding was celebrated 
in Chelsea, on February 2 2d, at which 
Mr. W-11- -mT-w was the fortunate man. 
This is Mr. T-w's third venture since 
graduation, and we hope that he enjoys 
his winters in the bracing ch'mate of S. 
Dakota. 

'99. Mr. Kdw-n Sh--k has con- 
ducted the coming French Ball, mod- 
eled after the New York prototype, 
most ingeniously. Mr. Sh- -k's experi- 
ence gained while at Technology in the 
conduct of such affairs has been service- 
able to him, no doubt, and the affair 
will be highly elevating. 

'99. Mr. R. W. B- -1-y has been ap- 
pointed corporal in the Army. He 
informs us that he still retains his old- 
time popularity. 

'99. Mr. F.. H-sm-r H-mm-nd has, 
by special arrangement with the Bird, 
had a lounge placed in the Cage, where 
he can rest between recitations. He 1 
sa)rs that the stone steps are too chilly. 

1900. The sad accident which be- . 
fell Mr. M-lt-n H-U, the doctors hope 
will not prove fatal. A safe fell six 
stories and stnick him on the head. 
Other than a severe shock he has re- | 
ceived no injuries, I 




The Basket Ball team was defeated 
by a score of 40 to o by Wellesley, last 
Thursday. This is an improvement 
over last year, and shows conscientious 
work of the men. Besides the lack of 
training tables, the team has been badly 
crippled by the loss of two men who 
were laid out in the game with the 
Emerson College of Oratory team. Mr. 
M-nsf--ld is still suffering from the 
effects, but is improving rapidly. 

The annual fair and bazaar, held 
last week, to make up the deficiency of 
the Football Association, was a grand 
success. Mr. C. H. L. N. B-m-rd was 
inimitable as floor director. Many ladies 
attended. 

Baseball may be resumed at Tech 
next Spring. 

A large number of students went to 
the " Gym '* last week to use a piece 
of apparatus which, it was rumored, 
had been repaired. The rumor was 
unfounded. 

The Board of Graduate Supervisors 
have decided that " Co-eds " will be 
allowed to enter the cane rush at their 
own risk. 



229 



THE LIGHT WENT OUT. 

Professor Cr-ss (speaking of inventor of incandescent lighting) : **Hi8 career 
^as unfortunate. Shortly after he died, and didn't push his inventions any further.** 



Professor H-ffm-n : "This process must be carried on in glazed underwear, 
or er — earthenware." (Wild consternation in class.) 




ARN-LD, '98. 

With nice little musket and buttons so bright. 
He drills and he marches from morning *till night. 
Jf he thinks that the Captain can give him S. B., 
He'll find he's mistaken as sure as can be. 



Professor P-p-: '* You must be very careful not to spill any of the acid on your 
clothing, because it will burn holes in it, and make the color of the holes red." 




ONE OF MANY. 
*' My son is much elevated by Shakespeare." — Ari- B-t-s. 



REPARTEE. 

Student: "Dr. W-lk-r, will you kindly tell me what this chemical is.^ I can't 
quite get its composition." 

Dr. W-lk-r : "No; I don't give a , and don't believe the Lord in heaven 

knows." 

Student : " Oh ! I knew he didn't, but I thought that you might." 



2^0 




How Children do Gtowl 



"Chet" Dr-K' (translating) : "She tank up to h«r knees in tlie mud, i 

gradually sinking " 

Professor V-g-l : " You've gone far enough, Mr. Dr-k-." 



George ll-tcli-ns-n! George W-sli-ngt-nl 
Bath mighty names are Iheae : 
The one lays low opposing cliques, 
Th« other laid for trees. 



AT AUSTIN & STONED? 
" [ have a friend whose father was a Chinaman and whoKC mother 



^NTHROPOLOGICaii ?]XIOMS. 



Large head does not indicate greatest intellect, — H-ffm-n. 

Hair is the most variable feature of the human species. — F-g-rty. 

Long, narrow heads do not indicate a low mental capacity (Tech. men have a very 
narrow set of heads),— ^W- B-ls. 

Special conditions make the Island of Cuba somewhat less healthy than the 
adjacent islands.—/'. S-nik-z. 

Redheads are hard to classify.— i'jcw, '99. 

In the negro a sleep is prevalent which eventually causes him to surrender life. 
It has never been seen in the whites ( ?J. — Banar. 

»3< 





TECHNIQUE 

TONSORIAL 

PARLOR5 




Pr<ifbssor L-nz- ; -- The rest of this book of Gllman's is tilted up with explant 
IS of why things ought not to have been ns they were, if they had been difTerent." 



^ Department of thb Interior : 
The Ll'nch Room. 



AT THE PARADE. 



e Alumni Coash?" 




POOR ROGERS. 
Kid Onr; "Is dat de Hahvud joint?" 
Kid Two: "Naw; dat's dc gas house!" 



AN EXCEPTICWAL GATHERING. 
Below is Rti excellent cut of one of Technology's rousing football meetings. 



Account of the same in the "Wrech": 

" Probably the most enthusiastic meeting that the Football Association ever held, 
occurred on Saturday, Owing to the extensive advertisement through the columns of 
the * Wrech ' an unprecedented crowd attended, and the subscripttons were accordingly 

muniticent, etc., gush, etc.. gush, etc., ." 



" Sported a Henry Clay head without the Henry." 



RELIGIOUS TRAINING AT THE INSTITUTE. 



It gives us great pleasure to make the exclusive announcement that 
at last the Faculty are considering the proposition made to the Institute 
by interested parties, some time ago, to establish a course in Sport- 
ology. The lack of spiritual oversight and care for our students, which 
is so generously provided for in most colleges, was felt early in the his- 
tory of Technology, and in order to provide the necessary accommoda- 
tions for this, the Brunswick Hotel was built and a portion of it fitted 
for the purpose. For some years an optional course has been given, 
and has been well attended. The establishment of the Technology 
Club, during the past year, has brought the matter once more to the 
front. For a full enjoyment of the privileges of this institution such 
training is necessary, and the limit placed upon the number of under- 
graduate members makes some method of choice imperative. Hence, 
the Faculty have decided to make the services in the Chapel compul- 
sory. For all regular students the work will consist of six hours per 
week, lectures and laboratory, and one hour preparation. For Courses 
IV. and IX. double time and special work is required. Annual and 
semi-annual examinations will be held by a special arrangement with 
the Technology Club, and no student shall be eligible to membership 
without a clear record in this course. 

The services in the Chapel will be under the charge of Professor 
Cl-ff-rd, together with the present popular instructor and his assistant, 
the former being considered a member of the Faculty with the rank of 
Associate Professor. In order that the time may be arranged to the 
best advantage, no provision will be made on the tabular views for this 
subject. Students, however, must make due allowance for it on their 
section cards, giving it the preference in case of a conflict. 

The course will include a thorough study of Beerology, Cocktailog- 
raphy, and Smokeism, illustrated by experiments which each student 
is required to perform, as well as the elements of Billiardism and Pool- 
ology. Students desiring to spend extra time may have free access at 
all hours of the day or night. 

For further particulars get special circular on ** Chapel " at the Sec- 
retary's office. 



234 




M. L T. YACHT CLUB, 
April I, 1313, 

Of( Mvliavc't. 



Professor S-dgw-ck : "Ci.nanjoi 
E. R. SH--K,"t)g: "AskAdatn." 





^^^Btt' 


B 


BE 


i^^^B 



AT THE YACHT CLUB. 
l-w-RD : " Sbjt Sw-8-y, do you suppose th«t Sm-th would get hoi if I jol- 

: " Don't know. Boiling point depends upon the nature of the liquid." 



Dr. S-dgw-ck (to new class) : ** You may take the first ninety pages for next ^cck, 
and we will finish the book the week following.'* 



A SENIOR PROBLEM. 

Calculate the number of foot pounds to every one of G-tty's jokes. 





How doth the little D^w-y do? 
Doth he do what his papa do ? 

Do'e? 
WcUt I gtsess he do. 
Don't you think he do? 



POLITICAL ECONOMY. 

1. Is a professor of Political Economy a producer? If not, has 
he any value ? 

2. State and explain the relation between rents in Cambridge and 
the salaries of chorus girls in Boston. 

3. How does home production affect the income of an instructor 
at M. I. T.? 

4. (live a concise and unbiased discussion of the Silver Question, 
mentioning the views of the author, the relation of prices to demand, 
the advisability of attempting it alone, and a summary of the discussion 
by the champions of both sides. 

Tlme : 10 minutes. 



236 



THE BIRDIE READING BOOK. 

LESSON I. 




Here are men. What is a man? A man is a grown-up lit-tle boy. 
Is the lit-tle one a man? Yes, per-haps. What is his name? His name is 
Fred-er-ick. What is he called ? He is called Fred-dy. Why is his head 
so large? He can-not help it. Did it grow that way? No; it was made 
so. What does he hold in his hand? He holds a book in his hand. 
He reads the book some-times. Does he stud-y? Oh, no; 
lie is a Gen-e-ral ! Do the Gen-e-rals ever study ? Ver-y 
sel-dom. Does the man talk ? Yes, the man does talk. 
:r//|ji\\ >3 What does he say? Very lit-tle, iisu-all-y. Is he nice ? No; 
"^ne ^' '^ "^"^ fKsh. Was he al-ways a big man? No; he 

SS was once a lit-tle boy. How long ago was he a lit-tle boy? 

Two years a-go he was a ver-y small boy. Does he love his teach-ers? 
Yes; he loves his teach-ers ver-y much. Who does Fred-dy 
play with ? He plays with Er-nest, Is Er-nest a sweet boy ? 
Yes, a dear boy. Is Er-nest pop-u-lar? Yes, some-times. 
Does Er-nest work ? No ; he is also a Gen-e-ral, Why do 
the Gen-e-rals not work ? They have a snap course. Do t 
they think they work? O Lord, yes! Do Fred-dy and Er- 
nest ever get turn-ed down? Yes; they were once turn-ed down. What 
do you call a man who is turn-ed down? A Pol-i-ti-cian. What do you 
call one who is not turn-ed down ? Oh! he is a Wiz-ard, 




ER-NEST 


SASS-Y 


HEAD 


SWEET 


GEN-E-RAL 


HUGE 


FRED-DY 


SNAP 


POL-I-TI-CIAN 



Dr. W-lk-r (when C-lc-rd breake n beaker) : " I wonder why these Course III. 
:n are eo irresponeible ', " 
S- -D-NST-CK-R : '■ Thsfs ensy. Tliej're minors." 




1[. D. H-NT, '97 : ■* Now. why do yon not have Ed. Sli- -k on yoi 
Cii-s. Br-dl--: ■' Well, don't you think he swears a great deal?" 



IN THE SHOPS. 

R. W. Sr-HB-NS, '99; "Mr. Sm.th. my physician has forliidden my doing koj 
lin work this year, but of course that won't prevent my continuing your subject," 




Testimonials. 



The following testimonials received by the Dosemand Kilhnm Company of Quack- 
lenburg are given space in this portion of the book on account of the public interest 
attaching to their authors, and also on account of a large sum paid by the Company. 

DOSKM AND KiLIIAM, MaNUFACTURBRS OF THB WONDKOUS SLBEP RESTORER: 

D^ar Sirs, — Allow me to express my g^ratitude for the service which your Sleep Restorer has ren- 
dered me. Heforc I used it I was much troubled with wakefulness, sometimes bein^ unable to go to sleep 
all day. Since a friend of mine, Mrs. Bird, w^ho like myself is in the checking business, recommended 
your specific I have had no further trouble. I also am now constantly visited by pleasant dreams of young- 
men paying term bills, etc. 

Rest fully yours, 






DOSEM AND KiLHAM, SOLB PATENTEES OF THE HaIR AND WoOL GROWER: 

Gentlemen, — When I first entered the Institute of Technology I was much troubled by loss of hair, 

owing to my fear of Mr. F- -nc-, to my chemical experiments, and to the conduct of my many lady friends, 

who not only pulled my hair, but my legs also. I was in a deplorable condition. It was then I saw your 

advertisement, which was as a beacon light in a storm. Thanks to the constant use of the hair renewer, I 

am now able to boast the most noted head of hair in the annals of Technology. Only two weeks ago I 

received a letter from Austin A: Stone, who offered me the position of Circassian girl; but I firmly 

refused, thinking such an occupation unworthy my dignity, and preferring the pursuit of knowledge to 

that of histrionic fame. 

(inntefully yours, 



<£. t/' ^. 




Do!SEM AND KiLiiAM, Proprietors of the Cleopatra Complexion Cereal : 

My dear Sirs, — How can I thank you adequately for the wonderful change that has been wrought in 
me by the aid of your invaluable remedy? Before I heard of your divine medicine I was in the habit of 
using daily 2 gills of rose water, J lb. of borax, i box of glycerine, 12 ounces of arsenic, and a steam vapo. 
rizer. I even went so far as to wear a complexion mask to bed. What I then accomplished by hours of 
.issiduous toil, I am now able to do in no time at all, simply by eating your medicated food. My friends tell 
me I am growing more beautiful every day. I inclose my picture: use it as you see fit. 

Joyously yours, 



^t(r^^%AWt^ 



iCfllXifeAj^. 



DosEM AND Kilham, Makers of the Gkbat Fraternity Nerve Tonic: 

Gen t/e/H en,— If indeed you are such : I should like to know the reason of the use of my name in ad- 
vertising your vile concoction. I have never used it, never will use it, and do not believe there is any such 
remedy. IMl have you know that I belong to none of the chappy and imbecile fraternities of the Institute, 
and would not if I could. Moreover, as I am as healthy, hearty, and as good looking and good natured a 
man as any in Tech. I have been comi)ared to Daniel Webster as an orator. Send your representative to 
me, and afterwards you will have an opportunity to try your senseless remedy <m one of your own tribe. 

Adios, 



^^^^i-^^/^ o^Cu^aMa// e^^> 



j^9<^i^€^2y' 



239 







" You're Dot Hm ooIy pcUk on Ibe bcadt." 



H CK-hK : "In IfiokifiK thj* up Ihc other dav. to find (omcthing that 
, I f'.und it i. verv hard pr-iblem." 




Professor Cr-ss (in lecture, pointing to '99 men) : "Now if 
we had lome gas tanks like those vonder. " (righteous indigna- 
tion hy the members of cane-rush committee). 



p d 0.= n (it) + II. T. (OCT)''' 



G. R. Anth-ny 
Professor P--( 
admit (o be Irue." 



"Profeitor, how U that equation derived f" 

)v ; " Oh ! that U one of the things I Invite jou to recognize and 



DoN'Ts FOR Tech Preshmen. 

Don't take 13 subjectK. 

Don't cut drill 13 lime*. 

Don't get on Thu Tbch. 

Don't whistle to the Bird. 

Don't ask questions in Phjrsits. 

Don't have 13 petitions refused. 

Don't call N-rm-n. ■' Professor." 

Don't attend 13 theatres per week. 

Don't attend chapel 13 times a day. 

Don't take 13 drinks in nn evening. 

Don't reach leciures 13 minutes late. 

Don't wear long cuffs at exam. time. 

Don't pa^ your bill on October ;oih. 

Don't go to Military Science lectures. 

Don't smile when " Profs." say R-dler. 

Don't receive 13 notices from H. Tyl-r. 

Don't call on the Bursar without a bed. 

Don't get gay with the lunch-room girls. 

Don't sit behind a big man at exam. time. 

Don't see Ch-rl-y Cr-as over your right shoulder. 

Don't fail to be at home when your report comes. 

Don't contribute to other than your own class tea 




BRANDED. 
Too bad! too bad! poor H-rby B— rs 

It is an awful burning shame. 
That your old failing thu« appears 

So evident within your name. 



CHEMISTRY SIMPLIFIED. 
"Dr. W.|k-r. how shall I dissolve this base?' 
on it! Spit on it!" 



WHAT VE ARE CX)MING TO I 



Name 

{IVben fullt take care with capitals and pnnct nation.) 

y4ge 

{Co-eds over Oo exempt.) 

Last Residence 

{Good looker >) 

o 

© Do you imbibe? 

2 a 1Vbv> ) 

"" b IVben ? [ Y. M. C. A meets every Sat nrdar at 12. 

^ c IVbai? ) 

or 

^ Si ^e of shoe 

{For acreage see Bursar.) 

£ Are you married? 

af a H^bni? b IVbv > c IV bat ? 

< 

yj Have you a family ? 

tj {See Arl-.) 

Z 

< Do you use the following : Lydia E, Pinkham's Pills, Allcock's Par- 

z 

^ ous Plasters, or Dr. Yanher's False Teeth? 

t 

Have you ever taken English? Studied it? 

{IVbat anestbetic did yon nse.) 

Have you seen Anna Held? Under what circumstances? 

Ever heard of L-n-s, F-g-rty, the Bird, Descrip, Flunk, Heat, 
''Getty;' etc? 



242 






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Respectfully yours ^ 



2 ear. 



Course 




243 



Propensor Ch-nhl-r: "You genllemen may think lhi« point verv large, but I 
sure vou tliat it lakes ■ pretty large one to be seen by part of this daS6." 

Mr. H-mul-t: -Well, Mr, P^nd-ll. are you all here? ' 







iiavJ. W*^ It-fArt-. 




History made euy by a new Doc^e. 
\ : " When the dinlance beliveen the carbons becomes too great, they 



A POPULAR METHOD. 

)FKssoR P-B'DY (in explanation): "There are tlire 
nay be secured,— first, by calculation; second, by calci 
y guess work alone. Vou may all go to the board." 

(Ten minutes elapses.) 
;ow, Mr. P-ch-n. how did you obtain thai result.'" 
.H-N : '■ By the third method." 

'44 



• methods by which » 
lation and guess Hork; 




A CONVERSATION. 

Walkbr Building: "Good morning, Rogere; how 
joufeel?" 

Rogers Bitiluing : "Oh, pretty well; I'm much belief ni 
since I've gotten my new Hawie; down-drnught furnBce; dc 
get so manj' eoali. And jou?" 

Walkbr B. : " O, I'm as hitppv as Maclachlan; I've go 
3 corner in Clarendon Street." 

Rogers B. : ■■ Stationary— eh?" 

Walker B, : " Yep. Say— do you know I envy you «oi 
• you're a lillle hampered in your 'upper slory ' — with L-n-s i 



? Of iTourse you're a lilll 
' Free-hand Ch-rl- -' " 

Rogers B. : "Well, Td rath 

Walker B. ; 'What.'— oh, 
wants things immej — right off, yi 

Rogers B. : " O, he isn't here much now ; we've gi 
tally does away with him." 

Walker B. ■ ■■ Thai does away with dear old Ch-rl- 

Rogers B. : " Yes. It's got a megaphone attachmc 



them than an old chemical Vatican " 

T-mmy 'ain't so bad,' except when he 

you with Ch-rl-- Ad ." 

; we've got a new machine, that pmcti- 



Well, 1 never " 

and just yells out, ' See the 



Tech's a great plac 



Walker B. : "Well, thai is an improveinenl. 
We've go! ihe 'Greatest Show on Earth '" 

Rogers B. : ■■ You mean in Tie Tec* office?" 

Walker B, : " Oh, no! The B-rn-rd Bros. Circus — continuous performance 9 lo 

^ . By the way. a good joke : Freshman named H-ll got into the Margaret Cheney 

Reading room, thinking it was Ch-rl-y's recitation room ; smelt the perfume, you know." 

Rogers B. : "Ha! ha! And that reminds me,'Justie' Erh-rdt came over here 
yesterday lo see H-rry about getting his room changed. Says thai with the Chemical 
lab. above him and Ch-rl-y below him, the odors are simply suffocating.'' 

Walker B. : ■■ 1 can't blame him. Heard quite a racket over in you yesterday; 
what was it ? Did Arl- tell one of his stories ? " 

Rogers B. : "No; it was only in Tie TecA Board. F-g-rty. '98, had just sent up 
another -joke' for pubUcalion." 

Walker B. ; ■' What, again? What was it this time? " 

RocRRS B. : "Something about an extra big lesson Dr. V-n D--U gave his 
French section, and a rematk one of his pupils made." 

Walker B. ; ■• What did he say?" 

Rogers B. : "According to F-g-rty — he said il was 
V-n-d- -ll-ism I " 

Walker B.: "Ila! ha! ha! that's good." 

Rogers B. : " Be careful ; you will annoy Ihe Bursar."' 

Walker B. t "Oh! wouldn't do that for the world. 
How is he, anyway?" 

Rogers B. : "His family cares i^e up a lot of his ti 
but with Arl-'s assistance he pulls through. He had nr 
candescent lamp put in the Cage the other day." 

Walker B. : "So she could get a 'Bird's-eye view 
the letter rack?" 

Rogers B. : "Sh-sh-sh! 1 hear the Institute Committee stirring, 
disturb their slumber." 

»4S 




ow-RD S-M--L Cir-P-N, SB., Ph.D., Frofemor of C/iemisfry and General 
Knoiv{edge. 
M. I.T.,'9S. V. 

Acsittanl rroreuorintSg6: In churiiear Course V.. iSqt: Prof»«ir of Ch«inislry, iSgS; Gcnenl 
lupervision of M. 1. T , in iSoS; Deacun of Y. H. C. A., fram iSot In tSmI Prnfeitor in charge of 
"SDonology."i900-Pri« Winner alTKhnoIoayBrauly show, 1S98; Leclnni in Low.ell<,ourK on 

Author of Enlertftinmcnti in FregVmiin Chcini&lrr (ijlh edilJon now <n pr»9, ind an elcmcnlarr 




When I leave Tech." 



TRANSLATION. 
Processor D-pp-ld (who has forgotten hii book) ; " Mr. St-w-rt, wor 
me take jour book?" 

St-w-rt, 1900, hesitates. 

Profkssor D'PP-ld ; " Oh, I can read your writing i" 



SENIOR CLASS MEETING. 
Schw-rtz and others at Ihe rear of the room, voting. 

Fr-ddy L- B-r-n : " If the genllemen against the blackboard u-ill klndlj n 
their gloves, it will be much easier to count." 



JUST A FET. 
SHR--D-R, -98: " How is it, Mr. W-nd-U, thai we see double?" 
Mr. W-nd-ll ; '■ There are several things which'-er-stimulate vision." 



Prokcssor W. -d (tn Calcului.) : ■■ A sllghl chunge will make 3{o«)=d(«««)*." 




NATURAL PHILOSOPHY. 
" Thb efficiency of a couple I« measured 
by tlie product of the forccB and the length 
of arm." (See Art. 55, Physics notes.) 



HORRIBLE DEATH I 
Innocent [90a (October isi): "Oh! Mrs. Bird, haw much do ^ou charge for 
checking?" (Funeral at 3.30.) 



pROKESsoB V-o-L (cxplainingj : " In Romance languages the moon ia spoken of 
,s being feminine, because she is mil all night." (Howls and cheers.) 



a Cl-ff-bu: "These experinienls explain the fact that the hand maybe 
dipped into melled iron, and that red-hol plates may be handled without Injury, a« I 
will show at another lecture," 



a^AP COURSE. 
D-CK M-MM-RS (8.30 A. M. in Chemical lab., to Ch-p-n, who has just come fn) : 
■' Well I Ch-p-. I've beat you down this morning." 

Ci<-r-N : "Oh! don't flatter yourself; I've just been out fifteen minutes for break- 




I COR. n. 14. 
lire itself teach you, that, if a man have long 



WANTED! A GLASS CASE. 
•9SMAN (in Phys. Lab. to McJ-nk-n. '98): '-How in h-ll does this d thing 

McJ-NK-s, '98 ; " My dear friend, I am unaccustomed to such vile language, and 
do not approve of it; I shall work at the other table in future." 




Leaf from a '98 Memory Book. 



LATENT MECHANICAL ENERGY. 



jp 



S. I.. H-w H[j, "'>7 (translating) : "She met him at the — er — what is Schloss- 




AN EDITOR. 

ThtE man with the look as ofpain. 

Is writing an Ed. for Tie Tefi. 
He h striving with might nnd with main, — 

Though it seemB lo be causing him pain ; 
[ ima^tine he's /-iviHeii. a grain. 

Like the rest of those writers, who reck 
Not a whit of exprefsing iheir pain 

By writing those Eds. in Tit Ttch. 



UNRESTRAINABLE, "GETTY." 

KssoK L-Ni^- (lo class H liich was hlamping al one of his periodic effusions) : 
len, genticmi-n, please do nol do thai any more than you can possibly help." 

OBUGING. 

KSSDR S-N]>-R-tK-R (after Antli-n V, '98, had linislicd n deiiionstralion) : "That 

:o clear ypt-" 

l-NV : '■ What part is it, Professor, which you do not understand ? " 



GERMAN AT H. I. T. 



sHidenten, 


stude 


gehardet. 


laten. 


Ions,' 


gedullet. 


yawiien. 


wink. 


fen.bedden. 




sound, 


gedraamen 


■even. 


wake, 


geiiippen. 


dresaen, 


wash, 


(■rqiiicken 


sudden, 




geflunken. 


dnmen. 


damilV 


hedammeii 



wnE 





On Uying. 

HE lies I have told you are many, I own, 
But without them I'd never progress. 
In fact, the results for the fault quite atone; 
You agree with me? Come, now, confess. 

When I said that your eyes were like shining twin stars, 
And your cheeks like the faint flushing rose, 

Though the words are a libel, untrue as they are. 
They are better than truth, I suppose? 

When I called you possessed of a fairy-like grace. 

Said your heart, as an angel's, was pure ; 
That you knew what was what I could tell by your face. 

And you weighed seven stone I am sure ; 

When 1 told you I'd never loved any but you. 

And that constant I'd always remain, — 
You believed just as much as j'our heart told you to, 

(The advantage of lying again). 

Yes, lying and loving together bring bliss, 

And all lovers will boycott the truth ; 
And lying they'll love, and deceiving they'll kiss, 

As long as there's maiden and youth. 

2JI 



(PRflNSaCTIONS OF J. T. T ' 




UR Sophomores and Seniors grave, 

On manual training bent, 
To Master M-rr-ck's turning; shop 
For recreation went. 

The lathes do buzz, the chips do tly,— 

A busy scene Is there ; 
The muttered execration low 

And sawdust fill the air. 



The fireatest low comedian 

In all the Senior class. 
To tell a joke a lona; breath drew; 

And then,— alack! alas! 

His mouth he ope'd; the air rushed in 

To lill the yawning; chasm: 
Some dust his mucous membrane hit, 

And caused, thereby, a spasm. 

He paused, he winked, his wrinkled brow 

Portended g;rave disaster; 
And then, convulsed, he sneezed a sneeze 

That nearly cracked the plaster. 

The keynote struck, two more hold lads 

Do join to swell the sound. 
A pause, — then, three in unison. 

They shake the very ground. 

Then in doth Master M-rr-ck rush. 
And quick shuts otT the power. 
" Now. boys, make all the noise you can 
For quarter of an hour." 

A cry spontaneous burst forth; 

Not one man stood aloof : 
In short, a long Tech yell they g;ave, 

Which nearly raised the roof. 



Again doth Master M-rr-ck rush ; 
With rage he seems to hop: 
" My orders stern must be otwyed, 
And you may leave the shop." 

From early youth it has been taught 

To do as one is told ; 
But, in this year of grace, that rule's 

Grown obsolete and old. 



M. 



fpECHNOLOGY'S gflMBON. 

With regal step and haughty mien 

We daily see him walk ; 
But few are those he stops to greet, 

With few he deigns to talk. 

His flowing (?) locks hang down his back; 

Perhaps they give him strength. 
For never does he have them cut; 

Each day adds to their length. -^r^ 

Let him beware of Co-eds fair, — i^^^ iT'^ 

Lest a Delilah should appe 

Vho may ensnare, and clip i 

Which is to him so dear. 



Lest a Delilah should appear, \^ v;i.. ji^' ' 

Who may ensnare, and clip that hair, \f,^\'^\^'^^ 



T 



^ Problem in MflxiMn SNt) Minims- 




N ■' variety's the spice of life," 

Yet " roilinjr stones gather no moss." 
How can one get the t*est of each. 
With the least of possible loss? 

A Prof, there is at M. I. T., 

With keen and subtle mind. 
Who has solved, I think, this problem hard, 

And proverbs twain combined. 

Just see H, Ty!-r every day 

For, say, a week or two. 
You'll I'le surprised at the change bizarre 

You see his face go throngh. 

He shaves as clean as monk at tirst, 

And tries it for a while ; 
Then grows a heard, and trims it otf 

In every conceivable style. 

Variety he surely has, 

And for moss, you'll all agree, 
What grows on the chin of H-rry T. 

Is tine as you'd wish to see. 




Two Things ^quhl to the ^hme Thing. 




Ill the Spring a young man's fancy 
Lightly turns to love, they say ; 

So it was with Lym-n H-pg- -d. 
Toward the close of term, last May. 

Thoughts anent a certain fair one 
Filled with restlessness his mind, 

And some present, tit to take her. 
Eagerly he sought to lind. 

Gilded belts for girls, that season. 
Were considered quite the thing. 
I'll get one of those," said H-pg- - d ; 
'■ Later on, perhaps, a ring." 

So he sought the marts of Fashion, 
When he learned, to his surprise, 

That the belt would not tit snugly 
If he didn't know the size. 

Then he blushed and stammered slightly. 

Losing all his wonted calm, 
But in halting tones suggested, 
" Could you measure — er — my arm ? " 




2<;s 




Hecollectionb of an Architect. 



How dear to my heart are the scenes of the chem. lab., 

When fond recollection presents Iheni to view,— 
The test tiities, the Ixjttles, the crude apparatus, 

And all the strange things that my Freshman year knew; 
The wide-spreading stairs that 1 climbed up so often, 

My lab. coat, in which 1 am sure I looked swell, 
The B.U.tiful maidens who shared in my labors. 

And e'en the bad odors which therein did dwell. 

The horrible odors. 
The far-reaching odors, 
The long-lasting odors. 
Which therein did dwell ! 

That ill-smelling chem. lab. I hailed with great pleasure (nit), 
As 1 rushed up the stairs so as not to be late ; 

I found it a source of an exquisite rapture. 
The pleasure of which no mere words can relate. 

3S6 




I ardently struggled with clothes-bags and coat-hooks, 
As into my lab. coat 1 tumbled pell-mell, 

Then rushed to my locker and broke many test tul?es, 
And thought that I'd rather by far be in h-ll. 

Those horrible odors, 
Those far-reaching odors, 
Those long-lasting odors. 
Suggestive of h-ll ! 



At last, when my work was once finally started, 

And something was boiling just quite as it should, 
I'd hear the sweet voice of the pleasant instructor 

Say, "Please, tAr. X., put that under the hood." 
But now, far removed from that loved situation 

I sigh with regret, and weep salt tears as well. 
When 1 go into Physics or elsewhere in Walker, 

And atch a stray whiff of those odors so fell. 



Those horrible odors. 
Those far-reaching odors. 
Those long-lasting odors, 
Which nothing can quell ! 





No obKCt more prcciou; is under th« luo 
Than pretty girls, dirnpling with mirth ; 

And ihough you may poke al their intellects (un, 
They're surely creations of Worth. 



"A collegfc joke to cure the dumps." 



'■ Thf kiniiest man, Ilic best toiiditioneil antl unwearied spirit in doing courtCMi 



■■ When I «a-. .11 home I «as in a l>ellcr place. "—0«r ;■.>:.- of TteA. 
■■ All Ihe learned and amhentiLrello«S--—y*.' Fxruliy. 
" Bui in Ihe waj' of bargain, mark _v 



nici 



h part 



—If:/ 



"He wasn man of an iinhoiinded Momath."— 7'-;r-_i', V^- 

■■The damned use that «ord in hell."- ApptirJ. 

■• And of his porl as meke as is a mavde.""— .I/r. C. L. Art-ms. 

" She U neither fi»h. nor flesh, nor good red herring."— yie Ci>-n/. 

"This is Ihe third time; I hope good luck lies in odd numbers." 

— i'. /,. //-;.-,■./. yj. Sninmrr SciooHf PAytfc 

" I'erhaps it may turn out .1 song. 

Perhaps lurn out a sermon ."—/>)--■ />.«.ir BI-fTf l.eclurf. 

■' Cheaply bought for thrice their weight in ^oM,."—D yawing Inftrameiilf. 



** Beholding heaven, and feeling hell." — The Senior. 

*' There was a sound of revelry by night." — A Meeting of the Corporation, 

"The little foolery that wise men have makes a great show.*' — Professor N-l-s. 

** And both were young, and one was beautiful.*' — The *i/S Biologists. 

" He used to wear a long black coat 
All buttoned down before.'* — Secretary Tyl-r. 

*' He is great who is what he is from nature, and who never reminds us of others." 

^E. P. Af-s-n, *97. 

" A banner with a strange device." — At the *<^q-oo Game. 
** Although I am a pious man, I am not the less a man.*' — G. I. F-sk-, ^gy. 

" It is a condition which confronts us — not a theory." — The Unfortunates. 

** Venerable men, you have come down to us from a former generation !" 

— '99 to R'tn'ry and T-zv Ex.y *gS, 

" So wise, so young, they say, do never live long." — G. T. C-ttl', *<^. 

•* I am very fond of the company of ladies." — E. R. Sh- -^, '^. 

" Alas ! regardless of their doom, 
The little victims play; 
No sense have they of ills to come, 
No care beyond to-day." — Ctass of*oo. 

" Pride in their port, defiance in their eye, 
I see the lords of humankind pass by." — Ctass of ^gi). 

{Above t'MO quotations sent in by II. M. K-y-Sy '99.) 
"The wisdom of our ancestors." — TechniquCy '97, '96, '93", etc. 



*' Who mixed reason with pleasure, and wisdom with mirth ; 
If he had any faults, he has left us in doubt ! " — Professor S-dgiv-ck, 

261 



'• For that fine madness still he did retain 
Which rightly should possess a poet's brain.'* — Pt-ojessor B-t-s, 

*• A poor thing, but mine own." — Jf'-//^' Geometry. 

'* Black as night, fierce as ten furies, terrible as hell." — L-u-s F- -nc-. 

" Born but to banquet and to drain the bowl." — P. Ci-Jf'-rd^ '98. 



■** A man who could make such a pun would not scruple to pick a pocket." 

— i)/r. Bl-ckst- 'ft. 

'* Their rising all at once was as the sound 
Of thunder heard remote." — Pol. Econ. 



'* You may relish him more in the soldier than in the scholar." — The Freshman. 

"That oiled and curled Assyrian Bull." — Prof- D-spr-d-ll-. 

'* A damned cramp piece of penmanship as ever I saw in my life." — Mr. P- -rs-iis. 

** Let there be gall enough in thy ink ; though thou write with a goose-pen, no matter." 

— Technique Motto. 

" Exceeding fair she was not." — B. I'. Co-ed. 
" I am slow of study." — IV-rc-st-r, '97. 
*' A very ancient and fishlike smell." — /j Nosers. 



'* What are these 
So withered, and so wild in their attire. 
That look not like the inhabitants o' the earth. 
And yet are on't.**" — After the rush. 

" Upon the platform, 'twixt eleven and twelve, 
I'll visit you." — Captain B'g-l--v. 

"Though it make the unskillful laugh, cannot but make the judicious grieve." 

— The Wave Motion Joke, 

" It will discourse most eloquent music." — H. G. J-hns-n^ *gg. 

262 



** What imports the nomination of this gentleman?" — G. A. H'tch-ns-n^ *(^. 

"Take phvsic (s) pomp; 
Expose thyself to feel what wretches feel." — To Specials. 

** Alas, he is too young." — P-ch-n. {\)j Technique,^ 
*' Time cures all things." 



»» 



*' When the brisk minor pants for twenty-one.' 

— (^See liquor laws as regards minors.) 

He's out of the ordinary run of men." — Gr-sv-u-r, *qS. 
"It.must be done like lightning." — Mech. Eng. Draiv, 

"The best laid plans o' mice and men gang oft agley." 

— J.D. Und'r'V"d''s Freshman Ticket. 

"The first in banquet, but the last in fight." — Class of \)y. 

"Every man for himself, his own ends, the Devil for all." — Tech. Spirit. 

" He was not of an age, but for all time." — F. W. D-l-b-r. 

" Oh dark, dark, dark, amid the blaze of noon." — 22 Walker. 

" Sweet bird that shun'st the noise of follv. 
Most musical, most melancholy. — Herself. 

His cogitative faculties immersed 

In cogibundity of cogitation." — The Lounger. 

■*' I believe they talked of me, for they laughed consumedly." — G. II. Wr-ght.^ ^gS. 

"The bell strikes one. We take no note of time 
But from its loss." — Physics. 

"And unextinguished laughter shakes the skies." — English Lit. 

"This, this is misery — the last, the worst 
That man can feel I" — Heat. 

■** A Frenchman must be always talking, whether he knows anything of the matter or 

not." — C. etc, B-rn-rd. 

263 



•* Doing good, disinterested good, is not our trade." — .\fac\s Co-op, 

*' His cheek is like a red. red rose." — C H, McC-rthy\ V/- 

"Eve of newt and toe of frog, wool of bat and tongue of dog." — Mcmu of Architectut ol 

Society's Dinner in Ckinafoivu. 

" 'Tis as easv as Iving." — Cuffing Drill. 
•' I have immortal longings in me." — //. L. M-rs-, '<^. 

•* Two friends, two bodies, with one soul inspired." — /^-ss and Txi-mblyt '98. 

"All learned (.'), and all drunk." — Yacht Club Dinner. 

'* Vein wisdom all, and Faults philosophv." — Course III. 

*' There is something in vour manner which would almost imply that you will hear me 

coldly."—//, ir. Tyl-r. 

" Short of stature he was, but strongly built and athletic; 
Broad in the shoulders, deep chested, with muscles and sinews of iron." 

— A. W. Gr-sv'M-r^ 'gS. 

*• A region of repose it seems, a place of slumber and of dreams." — Technology. 
"* Clean shaven was he as a priest." — Professor All-n. 
J "His eyes seemed gazing far away." — Professor P-/>-. 

"I am content, but you must let no man know it." — L. All-nd^ *<^. 



"Well, let these remain because I need them; and these others, also, because they 
need me." — Professor P- -h-tly (as he flunks fhrec fourths of his section in Thermo.) 



"Nay, though I ask you a question, yet 1 did not mean you should answer me. I 

mean to answer myself." — Professor R-fl-y. 



" No matter, it was long ago; 
And that is all we need to know." — The advent of P-ch-n. 



264 



■■Led by illusEone romantic, and subtle deceplions of fancy."— S/r-c*/-Hrf«c Silverite. 

•• The post of honor U ■ privHte station." — B. H'rd, 'gj. 

" About fls broad as it is long."— C. 5. Br-dl- -, '^. 

I could a tale unfold whose lighteit word would harrow up thy soul. — Hammer and 
Tongs Dinatr, March 8, iSt/rj. 

•• All is not Gospel Ihal thou doest speake." — C. L-mb, '97. 

" Hear ye not the hum of mighty workings.'"- /« ikc Shops. 

" I had a hat."— ffe/ore the rash. Elcdiou night. 

•• A good thing."-/. A. P-trh. -g^. 



•• Noted for their great philosophical research."- IK. ^. St-ff-ns, 'gS. alius Rrgaault; 
F. A. Sp- -td-Hg, "trf, alias Faraday. 



'■Ah! why should life all labor be?"-A'. />. .ff- -rf, '99. 



'■ Happy am I. from care I'm free : 
Why aren't they all contented like mt>"— Course IX. n, 




giaTISTICS. 



Instructing ^taff for the yBHR 

1596-1597. 






t. 



., *. 






w 'i- '-•" - * c 



K 



ArCIIITECTL'RE 2 I I I O 5 6 II 

BlOLCKiV. ZoOLCKiY. KTC ... I O I 3 I 6 3 9 

Chemistry i 2 3 H 5 25 4 29 

Civil Engineering 4 o i 2 411 112 

DrAWI.VO ANI> DeSCRIPTIVK (fEOMETRY OIO427O7 

English. History. .\nd Political Science . . . 2 i i 3 o 7 2 9 

LaNOI. A'rE I I 2 4 o 8 o 8 

Mathematics .... 4 o 3 3 o 10 o 10 

Mechanic Arts o o o 3 3 6 o 6 

Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics 2 o 4 N 4 18 o 18 

Military Tactics i o o o o i o i 

Mineralogy, Geology, and Geography ....1020 1404 

Mining Engineering and Metallurgy ....i i i 003 i 4 

Naval Architecture i 00 i i 3 03 

Physics and Electrical Engineering 2 o 2 7 3 14 9 ^3 

Total 23 7 21 53 24 12S 26 154 



266 



Distribution of ^tudbnts. 



UNITED STATES. 



Alabama r 

Arkansas i 

California 9 

Colorado 7 

Connecticut 23 

Delaware .... 5 

District of Columbia 16 

•Georgia 3 

Idaho I 

Illinois 45 

Indiana •3 

Iowa 12 

Kansas 3 

Kentucky 11 

Maine 29 

Maryland 9 

Massachusetts 737 

Michigan 6 

Minnesota 7 

Missouri 10 



Montana ... 4 

Nebraska . . . . ■ 2 

New Hampshire 26 

New Jersey 13 

New York 64 

North Carolina i 

Ohio 29 

Oregon 3 

Pennsylvania 46 

Rhode Island 19 

South Carolina 6 

Tennessee i 

Texas 2 

Utah 2 

Vermont 8 

Virginia 3 

Washington 5 

West Virginia 2 

Wisconsin 6 

Wyoming i 



Total number of States represented 
Total number of students from same 



40 
1,180 



Distribution of Students. 



FOREIGN COUNTRIES. 



Chili . . 
Cuba . . 
Dutch Guiana 
England 
France . . 
Japan . . 



I 

I 
I 
2 
I 
2 



Mexico . . . 
New Brunswick 
Nova Scotia 
Ontario . . . 



3 

2 

I 

2 



Quebec 2 

Turkey 2 



Total number of foreign countries represented 
Total number of students from same . . . 



12 
20 



United States 
Foreign countries 



1,180 
20 



Total 1,200 



267 



pUMMHRY OF (jRHDUaTES BY QOURSES. 

1565-1596. 



Year. 


Cminel. 


11. 


111. 


IV. 


V. 


VI. 


VII. 


Vlll. 


IX. 


X. 


XI. 


XII. 


XIII. 


T«tal. 


1868 


6 


I 


6 

















I 














14 


1869 


2 


2 








I 


























5 


1870 


4 


2 


2 





I 











I 














10 


187 1 


8 


2 


5 





2 


























17 


1872 


3 


I 


5 





3 


























12 


1873 


12 


-> 

«• 


3 


I 


7 








.0 


I 














26 


187^ 


10 


4 


I 


I 














2 














18 


1875 


10 


5 


6 


I 


I 





I 


I 


2 














27 


1876 


12 


9 


7 





5 





^ 

tm 


3 


4 














43* 


1877 


12 


6 


8 


4 


2 


























32 


1878 


8 


2 


2 


3 


3 











I 














»9 


1879 


6 


8 


3 


I 


3 





I 


I 

















23 


1880 


3 





3 





I 











I 














8 


1881 


3 


5 


6 


3 


8 





I 





2 














28 


1882 


2 


5 


5 


3 


6 





I 


I 


I 














24 


1883 


3 


7 


5 


I 


3 


























19 


1884 


5 


6 


13 





12 


























36 


1885 


4 


6 


8 


2 


4 


T 








I 














27 


1886 


9 


23 


7 


I 


7 


10 


I 





I 














59 


1887 


10 


17 


8 


I 


9 


8 


I 


I 


3 














58 


1888 


II 


25 


4 


5 


10 


17 


3 


I 


I 














77 


1889 


15 


23 


5 


3 


8 


17 


1 


I 


2 














75 


1890 


25 


27 


3 


5 


M 


18 


3 


2 


6 














102 


1891 


17 


26 


4 


6 


II 


23 


3 


3 


I 


7 





I 





103 


1892 


22 


26 


4 


13 


/ 


36 


6 


I 


7 


4 


6 


I 





133 


1893 


25 


30 


5 


2 


8 


41 


2 





6 


8 





2 





129 


1894 


21 


31 


4 


13 


II 


33 


I 


3 


5 


12 


3 








•38 


1895 


25 


30 


3 


15 


»3 


33 





2 


4 


II 


4 





5 


»4S 


1896 


26 


34 


10 


24 


15 


48 


3 


3 


7 


7 


4 


3 


5 


189 



Total, 319 366 145 108 174 286 29 23 60 49 17 7 



10 



1.596 



Deduct names counted twice 
Net total . . . . 



12 
1,584 



♦One graduate of Course of Metallurgy in 1S76. 



268 



^aLHRIES OF ^LUMNI. 



The statistics }j^iven below were compiled from over five hundred replies, received in answer to 
circulars sent to all the graduates in each of the twelve classes. In making up the averages, the exact 
values of salaries above $3,000 have, as far as possible, been used. Courses from which no answers were 
received have been omitted from the tables. 









das of 


'8J. 




Course. 


$500 to 
$1,000 


$1,000 to 

$i,5of) 


$1,500 to 

$i,00O 


$2, 
$ 


000 to 

2,500 


I. 





I 










III. 
















IV. 
















V. 


I 


I 


I 







VII. 


I 













Total, 


2 


2 


I 








*$|,^*" Over $3,000 Average. 



O 
O 
I 

o 
o 
I 






$1,250 


I 


3,600 





2,750 





1,250 





750 


I 


1,729 









Oass of '83. 










1. 








I 


I 








$2,000 


II. 











I 


I 


I 


3,000 


III. 














I 


-> 


5-917 


V. 











I 








2.250 


Total, 








I 


3 


2 


3 


3,667 









Oass of 


'85. 










I. 













I 








$2,250 


II. 








I 










I 


2,675 


HI. 



















2 


5^750 


V. 













I 








2.250 


VI. 



















I 


4,000 


Total, 








I 




2 





4 


3,62 1 









Oass of '87. 










I. 


I 





3 


I 


2 





$1,964 


II. 





^ 


2 


4 


2 


2 


2,288 


III. 





I 


2 


2 


2 





2,107 


V. 





I 


•^ 

«# 





I 


I 


2,300 


VI. 





I 


I 


I 


2 





2,150 


IX. 














I 


I 


3.375 


Total, 


I 


6 


10 


8 


10 


4 


2.237 



269 



SALARIES OF ALUMNL — ContintiecL 



Class of '88. 



CofRSE. 

I. 

II. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

IX. 

Total, 



$l,<lO(l 

o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 



$I,(10l) to 

o 

4 
I 

o 

I 

I 

o 

o 



$i,5()i> to 

$i,0(X) 

I 

2 

I 
I 
I 
I 
I 
o 

s 



$i,«nO to 

I 
I 

o 
I 



I 
o 
o 
6 



$;v«K, Over $3/-^) Average. 

$2,250 



I 

O 

o 
I 
I 

c) 

o 
I 

4 



o 

2 
O 
I 

o 

2 
I 
O 

6 



2.194 
1,500 

2,938 
2,050 

2.770 

2,875 

2.750 

2.382 



I. 

II. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

Total, 



o 
o 

o 
I 

o 
I 



2 

4 
I 

o 

2 

3 
12 



Class of '89. 

3 
4 
o 

I 
I 

4 
»3 



o 

4 
I 

I 

I 

■•> 



o 

■» 

o 
o 
o 
o 



I 


$31625 


I 


2.033 





iw50 





2,000 





1.450 


mm 


2,114 


4 


2,20C 



I. 

II. 

III. 

IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

IX. 

Total, 



o 
o 
o 
I 

o 
o 
o 
o 

3 



5 
6 

o 

I 

3 
o 

I 

o 

I 

17 



Qass of '90. 

2 3 

3 2 
o o 
o o 
o o 

3 I 

o o 

o o 

o o 

8 6 



3 

I 

1 

o 
o 
I 

o 
I 
o 

/ 






$1,750 


•» 


i»936 





2.750 





1.250 


'» 


2,250 





2,050 





1.250 





2.750 





1,250 


4 


1,919 



I. 

II. 

III. 

IV. 

V 

VI. 

VII. 

VIII. 

X. 

XII. 

Total. 



I 

I 

o 

o 

I 

I 

I 

I 

o 

o 

6 



2 

5 
o 

3 
1 

4 
o 

o 

I 

I 

17 



Class of '91. 

3 I 

4 o 
o I 
o o 

3 o 

3 1 

o 

1 o 
I I 
o 

15 4 



o 
o 
o 
o 

o 
o 

I 
o 
I 






$1,536 





1,400 





2,250 





1,250 





».450 





i»472 





750 





1,250 


I 


2,700 





1*250 


I 


I1540 



270 



SALARIES OF ALUMNL — ContintiecL 



CIa»of^2* 



Course. 

I. 

II. 
III. 
IV. 

V. 

VI. 

VII. 

IX. 

X. 

XI. 

Total, 



$500 to 

$I,(XX) 



3 
o 

■» 

o 

2 
1 

O 
O 

o 
1 1 



$ I ,(io<) to 
$i,5r)0 

4 

7 
I 

o 

o 

7 
I 

■> 

o 

3 

-'5 



$i,5(x> to 
$},ooo 

2 

4 
o 

I 

3 

5 
o 

o 

I 

I 

17 



$i,n(» to 
$2,500 

O 
O 
O 
O 

o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
I 
1 



$2,500 to Over «, 000 Average. 



O 
I 
O 

o 
I 

2 
O 

o 
I 
o 

5 






$1,194 





1*383 





1,^50 





1,083 





2,000 





1.531 





1,000 





1,250 





2,250 





1.550 





1.445 



I. 


6 


II. 


3 


III. 


2 


V. 


■> 


VI. 


II 


IX. 





X . 





XII. 





Total, 


24 


I. 

II. 

III. 


4 

7 



IV. 





V. 

VI. 


3 
6 


IX. 





X. 

XI. 


3 

I 


Total, 


24 



9 

-> 

o 
I 

5 
o 

4 
I 

22 



5 

4 
2 

I 

> 

3 

I 

2 

o 

20 



Qas of '93* 

5 

3 
o 



o 

I 

o 

o 

9 

Qas of *94. 

2 
I 
o 
I 

I 

■> 

o 
I 
o 
8 



o 
o 
o 
o 
I 
o 
o 
o 
I 



I 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
I 

o 
o 



o 
o 
o 
o 

2 

o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 






lt.1,225 





I,2SO 





750 





917 





1,171 





1.750 





1*250 





1,250 





1,190 






$1,250 





1,000 





1,250 





1,500 





1.083 





1,068 


I 


2,666 





1,083 





750 


I 


1,200 



Qas of ^5. 



I. 


9 


11. 


II 


III. 


I 


IV. 


2 


V. 


I 


VI. 


/ 


VIII. 





IX. 


I 


X. 


4 


XI. 


2 


XIII. 





Total, 


38 



4 
2 

o 

I 

3 

3 
I 

o 

o 

I 

I 

16 



o 
I 

o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
I 



o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 



o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 
o 






$904 





i^93 





750 





917 





1,125 





900 





1^250 





750 





750 





917 





1,250 





9»4 



271 



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7aBLES 5B0WIN0 ^lUMBER Of IjOURS INSIBB BNt) OUTSIBB pRBPSRHTION OF 
THE SEVBR9L I^OURSES. 



COURSE. MEPAITN- 



FIRST VIUR. '; SECOND VeaR. TMWD YEAR. i FOVRTH VUI. 

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L aVJL ENGINEERING, 

n. MECHANICAL ENGINEERING, 

m. MINING ENGINEERING. 

IV. ARCHITECTURE. 

V. CHEMISTRY. 

VI. ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING. 

Vn. BIOLOGY. 

VIE. PHYSICS. 

DC GENERAL STUDIES. 

X. CHEMICAL ENGINEEEUNG. 

XL SANITARY ENGINEERING. 

Xn. GEOLOGY. 

Xm. NAVAL ARCHITECTURE. 




(SQSTrm 



iTTWiDIEHTrfi 




suburban parts of Boston the Tollowing abbrevintii 



A AlUton. 

B Brighton. 

C Charlestown. 

D Dorchester. 

E. B East Boston. 

J. P Jamaica Plain. 

M Mattapan. 

N Neponset. 

S. B South Boston. 

R Roxbury. 

Rob RoBlindale. 

W. R West Roxburj-. 



Register of Students. 



NAMB AND FRATERNITY. 

Abbot, Lewis Benjamin . . 
Abeel, David Gustavus 
Adams, Burton Alden . . 
Adams, George Orlando . 
Adams, John Howard . . 
Adams, Walter Owen . . 
Addicks, Lawrence . . . 
Albee, Edward Everett . 
Albee, Herbert Harper 
Albin, Henry Allison . . 
Alden, John Trott . . . 
Alexander, Donald Nelson 

Alland, Leon 

Allen, Elbert Grover . . 
Allen, Henry Walter, A. 4'. 
Allen, James Walter . . 
Allen, Lucy Mabel . . 
Allen, William Henry, Jr. 
Allen, William Russell, Jr., -. A 

Allyn, Robert 

Ames, Joseph William . . 
Anderson, Charles Louis Bate 
Anderson, Robert, Ph.B. . . 
Anders(jn, Robert Peter . . 
Andrews, George Frederick, A 
Angus, William Jackson, A. T. 
Anthony, George R., *. B. E. 
Archibald, Warren Martin 

Arnold, Lyman 

Ashley, George Francis 
Ashley, Harrison Everett 
Atwood, Alfred James . . 
Atwood, George Desler . 
Atwood, Thomas Clark 
Ayer, Harold Osgood . . 
Ayers, Frederic Chesley . 
Ayres, Milan Valentine . 
Babbitt, Albert Lyman 
Babcock, Henry Kimberly, 9. H. 



COURSE. CLASS. 



HOME ADDRESS. 



. E 



M 



IV. '99 Danvers, Mass. 

L '99 Catskill, N. Y. 

H. '98 Essex, Mass. 

\'. '00 North Andover, Mass. 

I^ • '99 35' Broadway, Pawtucket, R. I. 

X. '99 Annisquam, Mass. 

VI. '99 706 Spruce St., Philadelphia^ Pa. 

1. '99 160 West Concord St., Boston. 

X. '00 Wollaston, Mass. 

VI. '00 Concord, N. H. 

^^' '97 547 Centre St., Newton, Mass. 

IV. '98 33 Falcon St., East Boston, Mass. 

L '98 8 Gaston St., Roxbury, Mass. 

H. '00 East Bridgewater, Mass. 

X. '97 124 Newbury St., Boston, Mass. 

VL '99 Foster St., Newtonville, Mass. 

S. 12 Wennehus Ave., Lynn, Mass. 

XHL '96 293 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

V. '00 Pittsfield, Mass. 

H. '98 4 Front St., New London, Conn. 

H. '98 7 Gooch St., Melrose, Mass. 

L '00 Newburyport, Mass. 

VL '97 6 The Ortig, Cincinnati, Ohio, 

n. '99 Danbury, Conn. 

S. '27 K. Manning St., Providence, R. I. 

L *oo 3213 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

II. '98 17 Liberty St., Waltham, Mass. 

I. '99 8 South St., Medford, Mass. 

VI. '98 West Springfield, Mass. 

IV. '00 II Laurel St., Somerville, Mass. 

X. *99 947 Acushnet Ave., New Bedford. 

IV. '00 Ayer, Mass. 

X. *oo North Bennington, Vt. 

^' '97 36^ Cross St., Maiden, Mass. 

V. '99 Danville, Vt. 

II. *oo II Forest St., Roxbury, Mass. 

VI. '98 Dudley St., Newton Centre. 

I. *99 10 Morton St., Somerville, Mass. 

VI. '99 Neenah, Wis. 



278 



NAMB AND FRATERNITY. 



COURSB. CLASS. 



HOMB ADDRESS. 



.A 



.* 



* 



Babcock, Paul Aldrich 
Babson, Roger Ward . . 
Bacon, Charles James . . 
Bacon, Lyman Edward . . 
Badlam, Stephen .... 
Bailey, Robert Willlxm . 
Bailey, Thomas Ward . . 
Bailey, Thomas Wendell . 
Baker, Elliott Rensselaer 
Baker, Philip Stone . . 
Baker, Willis Clark . . 
Balcom, Reuben Wilfred . 
Baldwin, Chas. Fowler, Jr , A 
Balkam, Clifford Mann . 
Ballantyne, Bertha Lennie 
Ballou, Henry Welcome . 
Bancroft, Joseph, 0. S. 
Bancroft, Wilfred. A. 4'. 
Barney, Morgan .... 
Bartlett, Jane Howard . 
Barker, Harrington . . . 
Barkhouse, Edgar Louis . 
Barlow, William Harvey, X 
Barnes, Warren Hammond 
Barron, Carlyle Norris . 
Barrows, Bernard . . . 
Barry, Charles Gardner . 
Bartholomew, Arthur William 
Barton, Charles Augustus, Jr. 
Batcheller, James Hervey 
Baumann, Edgar Butler . 
Bean, Walter Raymond 
Beckwith, Edward Pierrepont, A 
Beekman, John Vanderveer, Jr 
Beers, Herbert Page, *. B. E. 
Belcher, Henry Clifford 
Belknap, George Henry . . 
Bender, Lowry Dravo Wilkinson 
Bennett, Raymond Franklin 
Bennink, Carrol Augustus . 
Benson, Howard Jonathan, Ph 
Bergen, Francis Patrick . 
Bergstrom, George Edwin, B. H 
Binley, William, Jr. . . . 
Bishop, Frederic Lendall 
Bissbll, Thomas Hally, 4^. T. 
Bixby, George Linder, S.B. . 
Blackmbr, William Daniels, X 
Blair, Robert Sherman . . 



B 



* 



I. 

L 

VL 

L 

HL 

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V. 

S. 

VL 

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VL 

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'oo East Milton, Mass. 

'98 8 Angel St., Gloucester, Mass. 

'00 Winthrop, Mass. 

'98 State Farm, Bridgewater, Mass. 

'00 15 Columbia St. Dorchester, Mass. 

'99 12 West 22d St., New York City. 

'96 Kingston, Mass. 

'99 49 Gardner St., Allston, Mass. 

*98 7 Brooks Ave., Greendale, Mass. 

1882 Was*n St., San Francisco, Cal. 

'00 Graniteville, S. C. 

*oo Framingham, Mass. 

*97 '05 N. Gay St., Mt. Vernon, Ohio. 

*9') Randolph, Mass. 

Hudson, Mass. 

*97 63 Princeton Av., Provid'nce, R. I. 

97 Wilmington, Del. 

*97 33 'o Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

'00 81 4th St., New Bedford, Mass. 

'00 West Bridgewater, Mass. 

'98 283 Huron Ave., No. Cambridge. 

•97 1043 2d St., Louisville, Ky. 

'97 Mahanoy City, Pa. 

'97 9 Brinsmead St., Marlboro, Mass. 

'99 35 Broadway, New York, N. Y. 

*97 Reading, Mass. 

*99 98 Hillside Ave., Melrose, Mass. 

Newton Centre, Mass. 

'00 Park Ridge, 111. 

'00 34 Monument Sq., Charlestown. 

1838 Wellington St., Chicago, 111. 

'99 44 Woodbine St., Roxbury. 

*oo Cazenovia, N. Y. 

216 West 8th St., Plainfield, N. J. 

'97 54^4 Jefferson Ave., Chicago, III. 

'98 Easton, Mass. 

'00 13 Milton Ave., Mattapan, Mass. 

'99 238 Main St., Pittsburg, Pa. 

'99 35 Melbourne St., Portland, Me. 

*98 Ontario, Cal. 

'98 Akron, Ohio. 

'98 23 Tone St., Hartford, Conn. 

'98 Neenah, Wis. 

'97 i4TremontSt., Newburyp't,Ma8S. 

'98 Maiden, Mass. 

'98 950 Delaware Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

Foxboro, Mass. 

*98 631 N. Cascade Ave., Col. Sp*gs. 

'00 Waterville Road, Waterbury, Ct. 



279 



NAME AND FRATKRXITY. 



COl-RSK. CLASS. 



HOMK ADDRESS. 



SON 



T. 



Blakr, Francis Minot, S. T. S. 
Blakr, Kenneth Mallon, A. K. 
Blanchard, Arthur Alphonso 
Bleecker, John Stearns, S. T 
Bliss. Edwin Packard . . 
Blood, George Whitefield 
Blood, Percy E. Ford . . 
Blossom, David Henry, A.B., 
Boardman, Fred Cleveland 
Bodwell, Howard Lawrence 

Boland, Mary A 

Bolster, Roy Hale . . . 
BoNNs, Walter Werdenfeld 
Bonnycastle, William Robin 
Booth, George Henry . . 
Borden, Raymond Davis 

Borland, Hugh 

BowEN. Edgar Campbell, Jr. 
BowEN, Ralph Albert . . 

Boyd, John 

Boyle, Martin 

Hradlee, Charles Walter 
Bradley, William Dewey, A. 
Brainerd, Edwin Alpheus 
Bramhall, Charles Thomas 
Breed, Charles Blaney 
Brerr, Louis Bennett . . 
Brenneman, J B., 1. A. K. . 
Brewer, Arthur Francis . 
Brewster, William . . . 
Brickley, William Joseph . 
Briggs, Albert Billings 
Briggs, Charles Calvin, Jr., 
Brigham, Edmoni) Francis 
Brigham, Theodore William 
Brooks, Miles Elijah . . 
Brooks, Paul Raymond . . 
Brown, Arthur Harrison . 
Brown, Cardella Drake, 1. A 
Brown, Carroll Wilder 
Brown, Charles Hoyt . . 
Brown, Clarence Clapp 
Brown, Dickson (^'Een, A. B 
Brown, Edward Percy . . 
Brown, George Winslow, X. *. 
Brown, James Monroe . . 

Brown, John 

Brown, John Wesley . . . 
Brown, Stephen Pearson, 2. X. 



X 



*. 



X 



II. 


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II. 


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VI. 


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V. 


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IX. 


'97 


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VI. 


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'98 


s. 




I 


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I. 


'98 


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VI. 


'98 


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VI. 


'00 


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III. 


'97 


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'97 


L 




V. 


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II. 


'00 



426 Marlboro St., Boston, Mass. 

Newton, Mass. 

Newton Centre, Mass. 

6 Louisburg Sq., Boston, Mass. 

Newburvport, Mass. 

232 High St., Newburyport, Mass. 

Graniteville, Mass. 

Granville, N. V. 

Natick, Mass. 

West Boxford, Mass. 

1 17 W. Newton St., Boston, Mass. 

10 Cobden St., Roxbury, Mass. 
53S Jefferson St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
Louisville, Ky. 

26 Garfield PI., Po*keepsie, N. Y. 

739 Rock St., Fall River, Mass. 

25 Church St., St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

698 Dayton Ave., St. Paul, Minn. 

Adams, Mass. 

50 Marshall St.. No. Adams, Mass. 

Newburvport, Mass. 

113 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

Prospect Hill, Tacoma, Wash. 

39 Olney St., Dorchester, Mass. 
139 Court St., Plymouth, Mass. 

12 George St., Lynn, Mass. 
17 Henry Ave., Lynn, Mass. 
Bethany, West Virginia. 
Fayville, Mass. 

11 Court St., Plymouth, Mass. 
68 Tremont St., Charlestown. 

2 Pleasant St. PI., Boston, Mass. 

153 Craig St., Pittsburg, Pa. 

Newton Highlands, Mass. 

Carnegie Music Hall, New York. 

19 Milford St., Boston, Mass. 

4912 Woodlaun Ave., Chicago, III. 

Reading, Mass. 

1470 Broad St., Hartford, Conn. 

Rye Beach, N. H. 

Wellesville, N. Y. 

Reading, Mass. 

Hotel Majestic, New York, N. Y. 

113 South Park St., Halifax, N. S. 

839 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 

381 Park Ave., W. Mansfield, O. 

40 Durfee Ave., Fall River, Mass. 

13 Forrester Ave., Newburyport. 
Dover, Me. 



280 



NAME AND FRATERNITY. 



COURSE. CLASS. 



HOME ADDRESS. 



n 



Brown, Warren Day, A.B. A. A. ♦. 
Buck, Hattie Josephine . . 
BucKLiN, Milton Pollard . . 
BuELL, Charles Seaton . . 
BuFFUM, Frederick Delano, B. O 
BuGBEE, Edward Everett . . 
Bullard, Lewis Hinkley . . 
BuRCii, Guy Prentice . . . 
Burdick, Howard Henry, 1. A. E. 
Burgess, Philip 

BUFNHAM, F'rANK ErWIN . . 

BuRNHAM, George, S. K. E. 
BuRNHAM, Roy Gibson . . . 
Burns, James Dennis, Jr. . . 
Burr, Alice Morville . . . 
Burr, Helen Louise, B.A. . . 
BuRRiLL, Nathan Carter . . 

Burroughs, Karl 

Busby, Fred Edward . . . 
Bush, Walter Meiggs, i). A. E. 
Butcher, William Laramy . 
Butler, Ferdinand Almon 
Butler, Walter Harold . . 
Butler, Winthrop Fessenden 

BUTTERWORTH, ELWELL RoBERT 

Byam, Le Roy Henry . . . 
Cade, Marion Louise . . . 
Cahn, Edgar Bernard . . . 
Calder, Walter Douglas 
Caldwell, Frederick William 
Campbell, Charles Francis F. 
Campbell, Donald Chenery, A. T. A 
Campbell, Harry Andrew Bach . 

Campbell, John 

Campbell, Percy Alphonso 
Cannon, Sylvester Qiayle 
Cannon, Willard T. . . 
Capen, Carroll Adams . . 
Carr, Joseph Lewis . . . 
Carter, Allie Devere . . 
Carty, John Edward . . . 
Case, Herbert Monroe 
Cassidy, David Demorest, Jr., A.A.<t> 
Cayvan, Llewellyn Leopold 
Chase, Ira Mason, Jr. . 
Chaffee, Walter Crane 
Chalmers, Harry Bishop 
Chamberlain, Grace . . 
Chandler, Edna Matilda 



VL 

VH. 

VL 

n. 

S. 
HL 

n. 

L 

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X. 

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VL 

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s. 
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IV. 
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S. 



'97 103 E. 39th St., New York, N. Y. 

60 Union St., Woburn, Mass. 

40 Princeton Ave., Providence. 
'97 6616 Yale Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Winchester, N. H. 
*oo Allerton St., Brookline, Mass. 
'00 Wellesley Hills, Mass. 

'99 3^^ ^' 3^ S^'i Dubuque, Iowa. 

*97 205 Sigourney St.. Hartford,Conn. 

*99 Otis St., Newtonville, Mass. 

'00 Reading, Mass. 

'97 35 West St., Portland, Me. 

'00 Essex, Mass. 

'00 5 Allen St., Salem, Mass. 

1 19 Wyoming Ave., Melrose, Mass. 

1 19 Wyoming Ave. , Melrose, Mass. 

17 Winter St.,Newburyport, Mass. 

*oo II Landers St., Somerville, Mass. 

*97 Adams, Mass. 

'97 414^^ Clinton St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

'98 Lake View Ave., Camb'ge, Mass. 

*99 32 Hancock St., Salem, Mass. 

'99 212 Fir St., Akron, Ohio. 

'98 79 Tudor St., Chelsea, Mass. 

'98 15 Harvard Place, Som*ille, Mass. 

'9S 337 Crescent St., Waltham, Mass. 

'98 14 Clinton St., Cambrid'p't, Mass. 

'co Chicago, 111. 

*oo 1903 Park Ave., Philadelphia, Pa. 

*99 42 Stevens St., Winchester. 

*99 London, England. 



'98 83 Qiieen St., Lowell, Mass. 

'99 London, England. 

'00 Lincoln Ave. ,E. End, Pittsburg, Pa. 

Derry, N. H. 
*99 24 E. So. Temple St. , Salt LakeCity. 
'99 24 E.So.Teniple St., Salt LakeCity. 
'97 Randolph, Mass. 

26 Watts St., Chelsea, Mass. 

171 1 G St., Tacoma, Wash. 
'97 6 Kensington St., Roxbury, Mass. 
*99 109 Ann St., Hartford, Conn. 
*97 24 Cumberland St., Boston. 
*oo 660 Sixth St., So. Boston, Mass. 
'98 37 Fifth St., New Bedford, Mass. 
*oo 85 Edmont Place, Detroit, Mich. 
*oo Lonsdale, R. L 

183 Hammond St., Bangor, Me. 
V. *99 59Beech Glen St., Roxbury, Mass. 



281 



NAME AND FRATBRNITY. 



COUI18B. CLASS. 



HOMB ADDRB8S. 



E,< 



Chaimn, Edward Samuel . 
Chapman, Khrs Lord . . 
Chapman, James Finlay, B.S. 
Chapman, Mary HuciRKE . . 
Charles, Walter Nathan . 
Chase, Aurin Moody, B.S., A 
Chase, Frank David . . . 
Chase, Wendell Wyse,B C.K.,B.( 
Christensen, Wh.liam Otto 
Church, Lenoir Campbell 
Churchman, Albert Lawrenc 
Clapp, Frederick Gardner 
Clapp, Harvey Rowland 
Clapp, Mabel Delano . . 
Clark, Charles Bevan, A.B. 
Clark, Henry Archer . . 
Clary, Robert IIodgen . . 
Clausen, Rudolph Julh:s . 
Cleaveland, Walter Avery 
Cleveland, Ernest Eloin . 

Clifford, 1*aui 

Clow, Percival Charles 
Cluff, Clarence Brooks 
Cobb, Herbert Franklin 
Cobb, Herbert Luther . . 
CoBURN, Howard Lincoln . 
Coffin, Joseph George . . 
CoLCORD, Frank Forest . . 
Coleman, Ezra Abbott . . 
Collier, William Rawson, 1. 
Collins, Howard Browning, ii 
Collins, John Arthur, Jr. , 
CoMKY, Charles Henry . 
CoNANT, Franklin Norton 
CoNANT, Harold Sargent . 
Conant,John Bancroft . . 
Congdon, John Elliott . , 
Conklin, Herbert King 
Constantine, Arthur McGregor 
Cooke, Frederick Hosmer 
Coombs, Frank Eugene . . 
Cooper, Philip Benson, A. T. A 
Copp, Georcje Irving . . . 
CoRBETT, Charles Walter, Jr. 

Corliss, Cyrus 

Cornell, Leonora C. 
Cornell, Worthington . 
Cornwell, William Eames 
CoRSB, William Malcolm 



X. 

.A 



II 



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V. 

L 

S. 

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'98 23 Parker St., Boston., Mass. 
'00 Franklin Falls, N. H. 

Mankato, Minn. 

121 Union St., Bangor, Me. 

127 Eustice St., Roxbury, Masf. 

Comstock Ave., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Hotel Monnett, Evanston, III. 

Foxcroft, Me. 

Belmont, Mass. 

I Menlo St., Brighton, Mass. 

131 1 Rodney St., Wilmington, Del. 

169 Boston St., So. Boston, Mass. 

Port Deposit, Md. 

Hotel Vendome, Boston, Mass. 

1301 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

207 Second St., Pittsfield, Mass. 

Columbia St., Seattle, Wash. 

624 W. 6th St., Davenport, Ohio. 

West Newton, Mass. 

121 HighTd St., Somerville, Mass. 

Waverly Ave., Newton, Mass. 

Orange, Mass. 

13 Columbia Park, Haverhill. 

Newton Centre, Mass. 

Mansfield, Mass. 

143 Appleton St., Boston. 

635 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 

3 Weld Ave., Roxbury, Mass. 

193 W. Newton St., Boston, Mass. 

296 Rawson St., Atlanta, Ga. 

Denver, Col. 
'97 73 Cottage St., Fall River, Mass. 
'00 3 Herbert St., Dorchester, Mass. 

3 Wellington St., Boston. 

28 Pleasant St., Gloucester, Mass. 

421 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. 

810 Second St., Fall River, Mass. 
'98 70 Heller Parkway, Newark, N. J. 

iS Strong St., Newbury port, Mass. 

102 Rockdale Ave., Cincinnati, O. 

26 Maverick St., E. Boston, Mass. 

Naval Academy, Annapolis, Md. 

Rockingham PI., Cambridgeport. 

6 Rutland Sq., Boston. 

Randolph, Mass. 

709 South nth St., Lincoln, Neb. 
'98 Wellington, Mass. 

220 N. Wash. St., Rome, N. Y. 
99 13 Oakland St., Medford, Mass. 



'00 

'00 

'00 

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'00 
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'00 
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•98 

'00 

'99 

•99 
•00 



282 



NAME AND FRATERNITY. 



COURSE. CLASS. 



HOME ADDRESS. 



Corson, William Bertrand 
Cotter. William Edward . 
CoTTiNG, Charles Burton . 
Cottle, George Thurston 
Courtis, Stuart Appleton 
CowLES, Luzerne Simeon, 1. A. I 
Cox, Allen Howard . . . 
Crane, Charles Francis 
Crane, Charles Spencer, 1. A 
Crane, Eva Hayes . . . 
Craven, George Warren 
Crittenden, Samuel Hallett 
Crocker, Allen Swift 
Crocker, Harry Longfellow 
Crowell, Louis Austin 
Crowell, Luther Alberto 
Cummings, Henry, Jr., S.B. 
Currier, Charles Richardson 
Currier, Harvey Leon . 
Curry, William, X. ♦. 
Curtis, Arthur Vinton 
Curtis, Everett Nichols 
Curtis, Harry Appleton, A.B 
CusHiNG, Harvey Morse 
Cushman. Frank, Jr. . . 
Cutler, Jane Ruth, A.B. 



Cutler, William Henry, A. K 
Cutter, Fred Bertram . 
Cutting, George Warren, Jr 
Daggett, Eleanor Williams 
Damon, Harry Sumner . . 
Dana, Wm. Sumner Barton, ♦ 
Danforth, Raymond Hughes 
Daniell,Jere Rogers . . 
Daniels, Nathan Hagar, Jr., 
Darlington, William, M. E. 
Dart, Albert Charles, Jr 
Dart, Cyrus Victor . . 
Dater, Philip Herrick, B.A. 
Davenport, Maurice . . 
Davila, Jenaro .... 
Davis, Alvan Lamson 
Davis, Arthur True . . 
Davis, Charles Joshua . 
Davis, Huntly Ward, A. Y. 
Davis, Wilbur W^ard 
Davison, George Rupert 
Dawes, Fred Bradley 
Day, Mary Harriett . . 



£ 



S. 



B. 



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55 Palfrey St., Watertown, Mass. 

1 8 Skehan St., Somerville, Mass. 
'oo West Newton, Mass. 
'98 13 Copley St., Roxbury. 
*99 449 4th Ave., Detroit, Mich. 
*97 65 Forest St., Hartford, Conn. 

248 Maple St., Holyoke, Mass. 
*99 13 Charles St., Taunton, Mass. 
'00 518 Adams St., Scranton, Pa. 
'98 56 Trowbridge St.,Camb*ge, Mass. 
*99 Bozeman, Mont. 
'00 Highwood, N. J. 
'97 226 Kempton St., N. Bedf'd, Mass. 
*oo 102 Park St., Portland, Me. 
'00 East Dennis, Mass. 
'98 West Dennis, Mass. 
'96 3 Union Park, Boston, Mass. 
'97 285 Lamartine St , Jamaica Plain. 
'98 Swampscott, Mass. 
*99 Homeward Ave , Pittsburg, Pa. 
'98 47 Elm St., Qiiincy, Mass. 
'98 26 Cumberland St., Boston, Mass. 

28 Mt. Vernon St., Boston, Mass. 
'99 186 Maple Ave., Ottumwa, la. 

17 White St., East Boston, Mass. 

70 Pearl St., Somerville, Mass. 
'97 4801 Kenwood Ave., Chicago, III. 
•97 16 Otis St., Wakefield, Mass. 
'00 Weston, Mass. 

116 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 
*99 Brvantville, Mass. 
'98 46 Cedar St., Worcester, Mass. 
'98 4 Arabella St., Salem, Mass. 

Franklin Falls, N. H. 

13 Joy St., Boston, Mass. 

Butte, Mont. 

2106 7th Ave., Rock Island, III. 

716 22d St., Rock Island, III. 

2236 6th Ave., Troy, N. Y. 

360 Ocean Ave., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

Monterey, Mexico. 

27 Albion St., Hyde Park, Mass. 
*98 639 Congress St., Portland, Me. 

No. Chelmsford, Mass. 

709 Pine Ave., Montreal, Q^ 

91 Webster St., Maiden, Mass. 

33 M. St., So. Boston, Mass. 

Hudson, Mass. 

East Derry, N. H. 



*97 
\j6 

'00 
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'98 
*oo 

'99 
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'98 
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•98 
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2S3 



NAME AND FRATERNITY. 



COURSE. CLASS. 



HOME ADDRESS. 



Dean, Walter Clark . . . . 
Deavitt, Henry McIntyre, B.S. 
Degolyer, Robert Seely, 4>. B. E 
Delano, Morris Francis 
Delano, Paul Holmes 
Delesderniek, Fred. Moriimore 
Demeritt, Leonard Morse 
De Wolf, Arthur Simon . . 
De Wolf, Richard Crosby 
Dexter, Katharine Moore 
DiMocK, Elwin Hibbert . . 
Dixon, Charles Sumner . . 
Dixon, John Brown .... 
DoDD, Margaret Eliot, S B . 
Doi)(iE, Kdwin Sherrii.l. A.B. 
DoD(iE, Frank Edward . . . 
Dodge. Irvin(; Bigelow . 
Dodge, Winthrop Rufus . . 

DOLBEAR, KaTHERINE ElLA 

DoLiBEu, Franklin Whitney, n. 
DoNNELL, Harry Deane . . . 
Donovan, John Aucjustine 
Dorey, Willia.m Asbury . . 
DoTEN, Alfred Russell . . 
Doty, George Francis, B.A. . 
Dou(JHERTY, Procter La.mbkrt 
DowNEs, Alfred Kimball. ^. T. 
DoziKR, Henrietta Cuttins 
Drake, Charles Sumner 
Drake, Chester Francis, 1. 
Draper. Robert May . 
Drew, Albert Thompson . 
Dryer, James Cyrus . . . 
Duff, Ellen Loretto . . 
Dunbar, Howard Rec;inai.d 
Du Pont, Tren^-E. «I». H K. 
Durgin, Clara Isabel . . 
DuRGiN, Edmund Horace 
DwiGHT, William Barlow, 1 X. 
Dwyer, John Richard . . 
Eames, Charles Holmes 
Eaton, Henry Charles . . 
Eaton, William Wise, A. V. 
Eberhardt, Herman . . . 
Edgerley, Daniel Wilbert 
Edmands, Frederick Lincoln 
Edson, Warren Adams . . 
Elbert, Samuel Bass, X. 4> 
Ellery, James Benjamin 



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'oo 
'97 

'9S 



97 



go 



'98 
'98 

'97 
'00 

'98 



Dalton, Pa. 

Montpelier, Vt. 

1819 Hinman Ave., Evanston, IIL 

5 Walnut St., Somerville, Mass. 
'98 Kingston, MasK. 
'00 Xeedham, Mass. 

52 N. Main St., Natick, Mass. 

Melrose Highlands, Mass. 

112 W. Concord St., Boston. 

2 Raleigh St., Boston. 

697 Washington St . Dor., Mass. 

1608 R St.. N. W. Wash'ton, D. C. 

1608 R St., N. W. Wash'ton, D. C. 

58 Townsend St., Roxbury, Mass. 

Newburyport, Mass. 

163 W. Canton St., Boston. 

Grafton, Mass. 
'98 Newbiiryport, Mass. 

Tufts College, Mass. 
'97 Goddard Ave., Brookline, Mass. 

1105 Clarkson St., Denver, Col. 
'97 256 Branch St., Lowell, Mass. 
'00 643 W. 4th St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
'97 8 Mayflower St., Plymouth, Mass. 
'98 Pasadena, Cal. 
'97 4^7 Broadway, Cambridge, Mass. 
'97 5 Wash'ton Sq., Gloucester, Mass. 
99 Atlanta, Ga. 

1525 N. Rockwell St., Chicago, III. 
'97 42 Monum't St.,W. Medford, Mass. 
'98 Fayville, Mass. 

86 Federal St., Nevvb'yport, Mass. 

396 East Ave., Rochester, N. V. 

14 Sheafe St., Charlestown, Mass. 

Canton, Mass. 

Wilmington, Del. 

Belmont, Mass. 

175 Newbury St., Boston. 

1323 Davis St., Evanston, 111. 
'97 437S Wash'ton Av., St. Louis, Mo. 
'97 Andover, Mass. 
'99 50 Taylor St., Waltham, Mass. 
'97 Bridge water, Mass. 
'00 Portland, Oregon. 
'98 86 Franklin St., Camb'port, Mass. 
*97 29 Broad St., Newburyport, Mass. 
*oo II Tremlet St., Dorchester, Mass. 
'00 1030 2 1 St St., Des Moines, Iowa. 
'99 Annisquam, Mass. 



'97 
'99 



00 

'97 
'00 

'CX) 

'00 



284 



NAME AND FRATERNITY. COURSE. 

Ellis, Carleton V. 

Ellis, David Alfrku S. 

Elson, Arthur, A.B X. 

Emery, Earle Caldweli II. 

Emery, George Webster .... III. 

Emery, Lewis, 3d VI. 

Evans, David Howard II. 

Everett, Frank Warren, «!». B. E. . VI. 

Everett, Frederic Elwin .... I. 

Everett, Julian Franklin ... S. 

Ewen, Malcolm Faulkner, •!». B. K. IV. 

EwiNG, Charles IV. 

EwiNG, William Clinton .... VI. 

Fairbanks, William Kendall . . VI. 

Farnum. Dwight III. 

Farwell, Raymond Everett ... II. 

Faught, Ray Clinton VI. 

Faxon, William Aleck, X. *. . . V. 

Fearing, Albert Justin .... I. 

Feeley, Frank Goodrich .... II. 

Fenner, David Colton, Pii.B. . . S. 

Ferguson, Finley F., A.B., B.S., I'.X. IV. 

Ferguson. John Berton .... I. 

Ferguson, Robert Arthur ... II. 

FERRrs. Robert Murray, Jr. . . . VI. 

Field. Frederick Cromwell, *. B. K. VI. 

Field, Leonard IL, Jr., A.B,, X. 4». . IV. 

FiFiELD, Ethel Frances, A.B. . . S. 

FiFiELD, Frederick Alonzo ... II. 

Fischer, Adolph Louis VI. 

Fisher, Howell, A. K E X. 

FisKE, George Isaac, *. B. E. . . , VI. 

Fitch, Francis Theodore .... III. 

Fitch, Stanley Gay Hyde, A. K. E. X. 

Fitzgerald, John Watson, S. B. . VI. 
FiTZPATRiCK, William Leo . . . 

Flanders, Herbert Merritt . . I. 

Fleet, John Wallace, 1. A. E. . . I. 

Fleisher, Simon V^I. 

Fleming, Charles Edwin .... H. 

Flemings, John Albert VI. 

Flynn, William Burwell .... VI. 

Fogerty, Emory Hartwkll . . . XIII. 

Fogg, Frank Batchelder .... S. 

Foote, Arthur Burling .... I. 

Forrest, Mabel Flora VII. 

FosDicK, Charles Mussey, 2. A. E. VI. 

Foster, Floyd J III. 

Foulkes, Edward IV. 



CLASS. 



IIOMB ADDRESS. 



'00 Keene, N. H. 

Norwood, Mass. 

*97 49 Fort Ave., Roxbury, Mass. 

'98 80 Congress St., Bradford, Pa. 

*oo 6 Mystic St., Charlestown, Mass. 

*99 80 Congress St., Bradford, Pa. 

*oo 1513 N. 19th St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

*97 Highland Park, III. 

*oo Elkins, N. H. 

Madison, Wis. 

*97 ^94 Huntington Av., Boston, Mass. 

*97 1603 Rigg PI., Washington, D. C. 

*97 Danvers, Mass. 

*97 213 Newbury St., Boston, Mass. 

*99 24 Elm St., Brookline, Mass. 

*oo Turner's Falls, Mass. 

'98 Sidney, Me. 

*97 170 Lin wood Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

'98 South Weymouth, Mass. 

*97 103 Appleton Ave. ,PittsfieId, Mass. 

211 Fountain St. .Providence, R.I. 

'98 166 Freemason St., Norfolk, Va. 

*99 Woburn, Mass. 

*99 489 Broadway. South Boston. 

*97 Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 

'97 158 Hicks St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

'99 804 W. Main St., Jackson, Mich. 

17 Pleasant St., Salem, Mass. 

'99 Methuen, Mass. 

'00 Salem, Mo. 

•98 105 Howland St., Roxbury, Mass. 

*97 50 Elmore St., Roxbury, Mass. 

*co Watertown, N. V. 

'00 14 Morrill St , Dorchester, Mass. 

*97 Grand Rapids, Mich. 

'00 269 Webster St., E. Boston, Mass. 

*oo 291 Clifton St., Maiden, Mass. 

•98 85 Park St., Fall River, Mass. 

'98 24 Norman St., Boston, Mass. 

'9^ 155 ^- Main St., Spartanburg, S.C. 

'99 333 High St., Lowell, Mass. 

*99 64 Calhoun St., Springfield, Mass. 

'98 51 John St., Worcester, Mass. 

Hampton Falls, N. H. 

'99 Grass Valley, Cal. 

'98 227 Westford St., Lowell, Mass. 

'00 i28Pritchard St.,Fitchburg,Ma88. 

'00 705 Times Building, Pittsburg.Pa. 

*99 821 Front St., Portland, Me. 



NAMS AND FRATERNirV. 



COURSB. CLASS. 



HOME ADDRESS. 



T. 



FowLE, Frank Fuller . . . 
FowNEs, William Clark . . 
Fox, William Henry, i\ X. 
FoYE, Frederic Elmer . . . 
Frame, James Thomas . . . 
Frank, Mortimer 
Franklin, Arthur Ira . . . 
Fraser. Matila Alexandra 
Frazer, Robert, Jr., A. ^'. . . 
Frazier, Charles Wellington 

French, Abram 

Frink, Francis Guy .... 

Frink, Gerald 

Frothi.vgham, Brooks, A. B. . 
Frye, Albert Irvin . . . . 
Fuller, Georoe Arthur, «I>. B. I 
Fulton, William Howard . 

Fyfe, James L 

Gage, Du Relle, <t>. B. E. 
Gage, Frank De Meritte . 
Gaillard, Lawrence Lee, A 
Gale, Gardner Manning . . 
Gallagher, Edward Gerald . 
Gallison, Ernest Augustus . 
Gardner, Lester Durand . . 
Gardner, Stephen Franklin . 
Garrett, Christina Halloweli 
Gaskill, Charles Sutter . . 
Gauss. Carl Fredericii . . . 
Gehring, Edwin WACiNKR 
Geiger, Arthur William 
Gbrber, Elmer Louis. 1. A. IC. 
GiBBs, George Crocker 
Gibson, Austin Ely .... 
GiFKORD, Richard Tracy 

Gill, James Seei 

GiLLsoN, Charles Burton . . 
GiLMAN, Walter Eastman . . 
GiLMORE, Jonathan Monroe, B.l 

Gilpin, Russeli 

GiLsoN, Claude Ulvius . . . 
GiLsoN, Henry Robbins . . . 
Gladding, John Thomas Fiske 
Gleason, GEORCiE Hathaway . 
Gleason. Walter Austin . . 
Glover, George Curtis , . . 
Glover, Russell Henry, X. 4>. 
Godbold, Charles Henry, Jr. 
GoDDARD, John Newton . . . 



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'99 5.S7 Columbus Ave., Boston, Mass. 
'98 Pennsylvania Ave., Pittsburg, Pa. 

420 E. Merrimack St., Lowell. 

182 Ash St., Brockton, Ma^s. 

Dana Ave., Hvde Park, Mass. 

233 Hamden Ct., Chicago, 111. 

115 Bellevue St., Newton, Mass. 

Cleveland, Ohio. 

209 S. ^d St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

50 Mall St., Lvnn, Mass. 

Dedham, Mass. 
'00 604 3cth Ave. S., Seattle, Wash. 

604 30th Ave. S., Seattle, Wash. 

339 Marlboro St., Boston. 
'98 Alameda, Cal. 

'97 152 N. Main St., Springfield, Mass. 
*oo Chelmsford, Mass. 

417 Home Ave., Oak Park, III. 
'99 The Chelsea, New York Citv. 
'00 Bradford, Mass. 
'97 45 East Bay, Charleston, S. C. 
'99 Olean, N. V. 
'00 So. Framingham, Mass. 
'98 144 Shurtlefs St., Chelsea, Mass. 
'98 Detroit, Mich. 
'00 401 Charles St., Boston. 
'99 Philadelphia, Pa. 
'99 Mt. Holly, N. J. 
*oo 58LakeVMew Ave., Camb'ge, Mass. 
'99 '37 Walton Ave., Cleveland, Ohio. 
'00 350 Beacon St., Boston. 
'99 21 S. Terry St., Dayton, Ohio. 
'00 176 Pleasant St., New Bedr'd,Mas8. 
*oo 41 Hay ward St., Cleveland, Ohio. 
*99 20 Pearl St., Fitch burg, Mass. 
*99 Ludlow, Vt. 

1554 Oak Ave., Evanston, 111. 

202 S. Centre St. ,Marshallt'wn, la, 

Pasadena, Cal. 

1304 Brown St., Wilmington, Del. 
'00 Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
'00 Groton, Mass. 

'98 573 Potters Ave., Providence, R. I. 
'99 54 Bowdoin St., Dorchester, Mass. 
'97 44 Wyoming Ave., Maiden, Mass. 
'99 Melrose Highlands, Mass. 
'00 Harrington, Me. 
'98 150 Trenton St., E. Boston, Mass. 
•98 205 E. 9th St., Plainfield, N. J. 



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'99 
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286 



Godfrey, William Mollis. Ph.B. 


S. 


GoDLBY, George McM.. A. K. E. . 


VL 


Goldsmith, Claren'CE .... 


II. 


GOLDTHWAITE, HaHRY WaLEB . . 


I. 


Gonzalez, Alberto Primitivo . 


m. 


GoouHicH, Arthur Linslby . . 


X. 


G00..R11.GE, Frederick Stanley 


n. 


GooDsrEED, George Marston . 


V. 


GowBLL, Louis Nblhon .... 


IX. 


Gowes, Sumner 


I. 


Grabau, Philip Louis , , . . 


S. 


Grakp, Sheldon Dermitt . . . 


xin. 


Grant, Harry Lamar .... 


H. 


Gray, Albert Webster, 1. X. . 


I. 


Gray. Owes Herrick .... 


VI. 


Greene. B. W. Batcheldhh, i. +. 


XII, 


Gkbemlaw, Ciiarlbs Kuthekkukd 


II. 


Grebnman. Bessie. B.A 


s. 


Greer. Herbert L'hestrr . . . 


HI. 


Griffin, Arthur Eugene , . . 


VL 


Grosvenor. Asa Waters. *. V. . 


11. 


Grover, Frederick Warren . . 


vni. 


GURNEY, EWING RUDOLPII . . . 


XIII. 


GuTTRiDGE, Jambs Addison . . 


I. 


Guv, James RiNGoLD.B.S. . . . 


II. 


Hale, Benjamin, Jr 


S. 


Hall, George Anthony . . . 


IX. 


Hall. Milton Weston .... 


VII, 


Hall, Robert George .... 


V. 


Hall, Stephen Minard . . . 


VI. 


Hallstrom. Walter Augustus . 


s. 


IIAM, Clara Eleanor .... 


VI r. 


Hamburger, Charles Meier . . 


X. 


Hamilton, Alfred Starr, i. T. i. 


IX. 


Hamilton. Arthur Little. (1. i. 


II. 


Hamlen, Habrv Howard, Z.+. . 


s. 


Hammond, Charles Lincoln . 


I. 


Hammond. Clifford Rokson . . 


VI. 


Hammond, Edward Hosmer. <^. It. K 


V. 


Hammond. Edwin Walden . . . 


1. 


Hanson. Harry Christian . . 


V. 


Hai'good. CvRus Howard, il.T. . 


VI. 


Hapgooo. Lyman Proctor . . . 


I. 


Harahan. James Thomas, Jr., l:. X 


H. 


H.\rps, Harry Macy 


1. 


Harriman, Susan Sigournev . . 


s. 


Harris, Ralph 


II. 


Harrison. Alfred William . . 


III. 



793 Prospect Ave., BuffRlo. N. Y. 

Needham, MasB. 

Sherman Sq. Hotel. New York. 

Andover. Maes. 

19 Bigelow St.. BrEghton, Masn. 

Monte rev, Mexico. 

Stockbrid^. Ma)«. 

101 High Rock Ave.. Lynn. Mass. 

Hyde Park. Mass. 
■ Weslon, MasB. 

Wakefield, Mats. 

l';4 Maple St., BiilTalo, N. Y. 
I PlIlBburg, Pa. 

520 Greenup St.. Covington. Ky. 

33 Stanley St., Dorchester, Mass. 

6ji Fairmont Ave.,St. PHul,Minn. 
I 50 rue BaBsane, Paris, France. 

19 Atherton St., Roxbury, Ma»s. 
Myslit, Conn. 

New Castle, Pa. 

Winthrop, Mass. 

AmhcrBI, Mass. 

16 Grover St., Lynn, Mass. 

40 Lee St., Cambridge, Mass. 

Garden St.. Roslindale, Mass. 

10 Fenchurch St.. Norfolk. Va. 

Newburyporl, MasB. 

30 Exeter St., Boston, Mass. 

Pittsburg, Pa. 

417 Park Ave., Waverly, N. Y. 

Roslindale, MasB. 

North Middleboro, Mass. 

22 Dracut St., Dorchester, Mass, 

i^gLarkSt.. Albany, N. Y. 

45 ForeBt St.. Fond du Lac, Wis. 

20 Pleasant St.. Augusta, Me. 
Atlantic, Mass. 

29+ Penna. Ave.. ButTalo, N, Y. 
Newton Centre, Mass. 
Asbury Park, N.J. 
72 Munroe St.. Roxbury, Mass. 
I 484 Bro.idway. Everett, Mass. 
Athol Centre. Mbbb. 
135 5i8t St., Cliicago, III. 
Nantucket, Mass. 



Reve 



e. Mas 



fiioMiami St. .Leavenworth, Kan. 

Jio W.Lake St., Minn-p'lis, Minn. 



NAME AND FRATERNITY. 



COURSE. CLASS. 



HOME ADDRESS. 



X. 

T, Jr 



Harrison, Richard Carter 
Hartt, William Stephen . 
Harwood, Charles Frank 
Hasbrouck. Ross .... 
Haselton, Barton . . . 
Haskell, Gkorge Owens, K. A 
Haskins, Charles Nelso.n . 
Hatch, George Franklin . 

Hatch, Israel, Jr 

Hathaway, Harold W. . . 
Hawes, Alexander G., Jr., ^ 
Hawkins, Edgar Marvin 
Hayden, Fred Lawrence 
Hayden, Joseph Alonzo 
Hayden, Lewis Andrews, 1. X 
Hayward, Nathan, A.B. 
Hayward, Royal Hohart . 
Hazard, William Abbott, 1. 
Hazeltine, Benjamin Prescot 
Hazeltine, James Ezra . . 
Healey, Benjamin Francis 
Healy, Frederick Elliott 
Hearne, William Lowder . 
Heathman, Frank Boltin . 
Heckle, George Rogers 
Heghinian, Garabed G., A.B. 
Heisler, Edward Rudolph, i) 
Heitshu, JSamuel Parks 
Hemmings, Frederick John 
Henry, Ralph Coolidgk, S.B 
Herbert. Edward .... 
Hering, Oswald C, A. K. K. 
Herman, Bernard .... 
Hermanns, Frank Edward 
Hern, Joseph Louis . . . 
Hewi.ns, Lyman Foster . . 
Hewitt, Ed. Hawley, A B., A 
Hicks, Anna Cordelia . . 
HiGGiNs, John Mitchell, X. 4>. 
High, Carl Stout .... 
Hildreth, Edward Theodore 
Hill, Grace Mary . . . 
Hill, William Gilbert, Jr. 
Hinckley, Benjamin Stearns 
Hinckley, Everett Hale . 

HiNMAN, Dean 

HiNMAN, Walter Hibbard . 
Hodsdon, Charles Wentworth 

HOEFLER, PhILO REMINGTON, B.S 



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Braintree, Mass. 
'00 2S5 Fairmount St., Hyde Park. 
'99 Warren, Mass. 
*99 75 Market St., Poughkeepsie.N. Y. 
'00 118 W. Garden St., Rome, X. Y. 

88 State St., Savannah, Ga. 

87 Chestnut St., New Bedford. 

Dedham, Mass. 

Hanover, Mass. 

107 Mass. Ave., Arlington, Mass. 

Mills Building, San Francisco, Cal. 

107 Maple St., VV. Roxbury, Mass. 
'98 28 Holt St., Fitchburg, Mass. 

East Hartford, Conn. 

1637 Sherman Ave., Denver, Col. 

85 Brattle St., Cambridge, Mass. 

18 Holborn St.. Roxbury, Mass. 

723 3d St., l)es Moines, la. 

Belfast, Me. 

Warren, Pa. 

602 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 

East Providence, R. I. 
'00 Wheeling, West Virginia. 
'97 Dayton, Ohio. 
'99 55 Moreland St., Roxbury, Mass. 

Marash, Turkey. 

4427 Grand Boulevard, Chicago. 

512 E. King St., Lancaster, Pa. 

9 Sussex St., Boston, Mass. 

Watertown, Mass. 

Broad Run, Va. 

277 Pearl St., New York, N. Y. 
'99 73S 7th St., N. W. Wash'n, D. C. 
'99 400 Broadway, Denver, Col. 
'99 34 Sidney St., Dorchester, Mass. 
'98 353 Wash'n St., Dorchester, Mass. 

Red Wing, Minn. 

Cheyenne, Wyo. 
'00 25 Bos we 11 Ave., Norwich, Conn. 
'98 Arlington, Kansas. 

The Gables, Brookline, Mass. 

62 Market St., Amesbury, Mass. 
'97 84 Convervse Ave., Maiden, Mass. 
'98 Woburn, Mass. 
*99 llyannis, Mass. 

158 Williams St., Taunton, Mass. 

29 Albano St., Roslindale, Mass. 

148 Allston St., Cambridgeport. 

Ilion, N. Y. 



99 
'97 



'97 

'99 
'97 



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288 



NAMB AND FRATBRNITY. 



COURSE. CLASS. 



HOME ADDRESS. 



HoiT, Henry Ford, A. K. E. 
IIoLABiRU, Robert Grant, 2. X. 
HoLBRooK, George Myron 
HoLLiDAY. Alexander R., X. * 
Holmes, Edward Lowtiier, A 
Holmes, Merton Austin 
Hooker, Stanley Agar . . 
Hopeman, Bertram Corneliu 
Hopkins, Arthur Thomas . 
Hopkins, Ueber Augustus 
Hopkins, Robert Milne 
Hopwood, Cora Stella 

HORGAN, fOHN DeNNIS . . 

Horsey, Outerbridge, Jr., A.U. 
HoRTON, Frank Nelson 
HoRTON, Ralph Tucker . . 
HosFORD, Roger Fuller 
Hosmer, George Leonard . 
Hough, Elizabeth E. . 
Hough, William Baldwin, A. T. 
House, John Henry, Jr. . . 
Howard, Arthur Fiske, B.S., X. *. 
Howard, Ethan Henry, A. T. 
Howard, Harold Emmons . 
Howard, Sheldon Leavitt, 4>, B. E 
Howe, Herbert Holmes 
Howes, Benjamin Alfred 
HowLAND, John Hastings, i). A. E. 
HowLAND, Richard Stanley, O. H. 
HoxiE, Timothy Wright, 0. H 
Hubbard, Chester Dimock 
Hubbard, Jesse Branch . 
Hubbard, William Henry 
Hubbard, Winifred Dean 
Hughes, Charles Haynes 
Hume, George Seward . 
Humphrey, Seth King 
Humphreys, Walter, A. K. E. 
Hunnewell, Frederick Allen 
Hunt, Harry BuRLEKiii, 2. X. 
Hunt, Harry Draper 
Hunt, Harry Leigh . . 
Hunt, Herman Reynolds 
Huntington, Geo. Danforth, A.B 
HuRD, Benjamin, S.B., *. B. E. 
HuRD, William Robinson . 
HiJRTER, Charles Swanberg 
HusE, Arthur Wood . . . 
HussEY, James Whittlesey 



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II. 

VI. 

S. 

II. 

XIII. 

II. 

IX. 

VL 

XIII. 

I. 

II. 

II. 

III. 

I. 

XIII. 



'99 
'oo 

*99 
'Q9 



3916 Lake Avenue, Chicago, III. 

1500 Oak Ave., Evanston, III. 

116 Chestnut St., Cambridgeport. 

601 N. Meridan St., Indianapolis. 

Alameda, Cal. 

Newton Highlands, Mass. 
'98 3639 Reading Road, Avondale, O. 
'00 39 Lake View Pk., Roch*er, N. Y. 
'97 9 Flint Ave., Somerville, Mass. 
*9S 276 Pearl St., Cambri'port, Mass. 
*oo 610 Cambridge St., Allston, Mass. 
'00 205 Austin St., W'orcester, Mass. 
'98 I Leeds St., Dorchester, Mass. 
'98 Burkittsville, Md. 
'99 Southbridge, Mass. 
*98 Foxboro, Mass. 
*97 19 Burlington Ave., Boston, Mass. 
*97 350 Salem St., Woburn, Mass. 

48 Rutland Sq., Boston, Mass. 
*oo 705 W. 3d St., Williamsport, Pa. 
'98 Salonica, Turkey. 
'98 56 Middle St., Portsmouth, N. H. 
*97 141 W.Chippewa St., Buffalo, N.Y. 
*99 Westfield, Mass. 
'97 46 Somerset Ave., Taunton, Mass. 
'00 13 Townsend St., Roxbury, Mass. 
*97 36 Marlboro St., Keene, N. H. 
*97 2 Wellington St., Boston, Mass. 
'97 69 Manning St., Providence, R. I. 
*99 244 Walnut Ave., Roxbury, Mass. 
*97 134 W. Newton St., Boston, Mass. 
'98 79 Francis Ave., Pittsfieid, Mass. 
*oo Charleston, S. C. 
'98 Concord, Mass. 
*oo 5 Concord Sq., Boston, Mass. 

Eastport, Me. 

16 Berwick Park, Boston, Mass. 

Humphreys PL, Dorchester, Mass. 

18 Orchard St., Cambridge, Mass. 
'97 378 7th St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 
'97 North Attleboro, Mass. 

Willimantic, Conn. 

108 Court St., New Bedford, Mass. 

526 West St., Rochester, N. Y. 

11 Wavcrly St., Brookline, Mass. 

8 Butler St., Dorchester, Mass. 

21 Water St., Hyde Park, Mass. 
'98 Newbury port, Mass. 
'00 153 1 Cherry St., Toledo, Ohio. 



'99 

'97 
'97 



00 
'00 

'98 

'97 
'00 

'97 



289 



NAMS AND FRATCKNITY. 



COUKSB. CLASS. 



HOME ADDRESS. 



B 



E. 



Hutchinson, George Anthony 
Hyde, Anna Farwell . . 
Hyde, William Francis . . 
Ilslev, John Parker, Jr., A. ^. 
Ingalls, Frederick Dv Dots 
Ingalls, Harry Creighton. A 
Jackson, Allen W., A. K. E. 
Jackson, George Otis . . 
Jackson, Henry Docker . . 
Jackson, VVillard Franklin 
Jacobs, Elbridge Churchill 
Jacoby, Areli Hull . . . 
James, Henry Philip . . . 
Jenkins, I.awrence Waters, A 
Jennings, Arthur Lewis 
Jennings, Levi Brown . . 
Jennings, Walter Uimiam 
Johnson, Arthur Albert, A.H 
Johnson, Carl Francis . . 
Johnson, Charles Chatlin- 
Johnson, Daniel Stewart . 
Johnson, Edward, Jr., G. 2. 
Johnson, Harry George,*. B. 
Johnson, Josephine Forbush 

Johnson, Lane 

Johnson, Paul Franklin 
Jones, Bassett, Jr., A. T. 
Jones, Frederic Alexandmr 
Jones, F'rederick Hooper . 
Jones, Harold Wellington 
Jones, Samuel Fosdick, A 4'. 
Jones, Sullivan W^illiams, A. T. 
JouETT, Henry Detrict . . 

Kattelle, Walter Roby 

Kaufman, Irvin Hayks . . 

Keene, Arthur Samuel . . 

Keisker, Frank Henrv . . 

Keith, Leigh Shelton . . 

Krith, Simeon Curtis, Jr., S.B. 

Kelley, Horace Alcinous . 

Kelley, William .... 

Kellogg, Franklin Miner 

Kelly, John Francis . . . 

Kendall, Arthur Isaac 

Kendall, Robert Everett 

Keniston, James Augustus 

Kennedy, Mildred . . . 

Kent, William Albert . . 

Keys, Harry Montifix . . 



E 



H. 

S. 

S. 

H. 

H. 
IV. 
IV. 

S. 
VI. 
IV. 
HI. 

V. 

II. -VI. 

HI. 

II. 
I. 
I. 

S. 

H. 

X. 

s. 
I. 

V. 

s. 
II. 
II. 

VI. 

I. 

V. 
VII. 

s. 

XIII. 

I. 

IV. 
H. 
IV. 
IV. 
VI. 

s. 
II. 
s. 

VI. 

s. 

V. 
V. 

s. 
s. 
I. 

VI. 



*9S 14 Wales St., Dorchester, Mast. 

38oConimonwenlth Ave., Boston. 

79 Beacon St., Hyde Park, Mass. 
'97 E. Walnut Av., Gennantown, Pa. 
*oo 619 Broadway, Kingston, N. Y. 
'98 229 Ocean St., Lynn, Mass. 
'97 33 Coolidge St., Brookline, Mass. 

Lexington, Mass. 
'97 Hotel Oxford, Boston, Mass. 
'00 560 Summer St., Campello, Mass. 
'97 38 Mt. Vernon St., Maiden, Mass. 
98 144 W. F'klin St. , W^ilkesbai re. Pa. 
'99 Kendall Green, Mass. 
*oo 125 St. Botolph St., Boston. 
'97 Deep River, Conn. 
'00 Weston, Mass. 
'00 Newton Lower Falls, Mass. 

Irvington, Ind. 
'00 1 20 Sycamore, St., Milwaukee, Wis. 
'00 Danversport, Mass. 

Short Hills, N.J. 
'98 178 Marlboro St., Boston, Mass. 
'99 Auburndale, Mass. 

393 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 
'99 338 Olive St., Kansas City, Mo. 
'98 67 Westland Ave., Boston, Mass. 
'99 207 W. 84th St., New York City. 
'98 Needham, Mass. 
'98 South Lincoln, Mass. 
'98 South Lincoln, Mass. 

228 W. 7th St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
'00 207 W. 84th St., New York City. 
'00 31 Chester St., Somerville, Mass. 
'00 Auburndale, Mass. 
'98 University Road, Brookline, Mass. 
'98 41 Murdock St., Brighton, Mass. 
'97 535 E. ChestnutSt., Louisville, Ky. 
'00 North Easton, Mass. 

4 Romsey St., Dorchester, Mass. 
'98 914 N. 6th St., Burlington, Iowa. 

118 Mt. Wash'n St.. Lowell, Mass. 
'98 West Stanford, Conn. 

Meade Ave., Passaic, N. J. 
'99 388 Broadway, Somerville, Mass. 
'98 193 Fairmont Ave., Hyde Park. 

Hospital for Insane, Middletown. 

Readville, Mass. 
'96 496 Columbus Ave. , Boston, Mass. 
'99 Linden, Md. 



290 



NAMB AND FRATERNITY. 



COURSE. CLASS. 



HOME ADDRESS. 



KiLLAM, James Warren . . . 
Kimball, Fred Lewis Holt 
Kimball, Walter Everard 
KiMBERLY, Albert Elliott 
King, George Ilgenfritz . . 
King, William Braman . . . 
Kingman, William Alden . . 
Kingsbury, Ivy Anna . . . 
Kinsman, William Abbot , O. H. 
Kleinsciimidt, Frederick . . 
Knight, George Horace . . 
Knight, George Washington 
Koch, Carleton Spayth, X. 4>. 
Kruse, Conrad Frederick. 4>. A. 6. 

KuTTROFF, Edwin 

Lacaff, Florian Leo .... 

Lacy, Robert, A.B 

Laing, Minerva Abigail . . 
Lamb, Augustus Clark, A. T. A. 
Lambert, Fred De Forest 
Lander, Ruth Ella .... 
Lane, Edward Percy .... 

Langford, Grace 

Lansingii, Van Rensselaer B.S 
Larcombe, John Southey, Jk. . 
Larrabee, John Hbber . . . 
Lathrop, Fred Haskins . . 
Lawler, George Sherriffs . 
Lawley, Arthur Crosbie . . 
Lawley, Frederick Damon 
Lawrence, Amos Amory, A.B. 
Lawrence, Herbert Everett 
Lawrence. Lewis Morse . . 
Leach, George Henry . . . 
Leach, Robert Howl and . . 
Leach, William Henry, Jr. 
Leadbetter, Florence Eugenie 
Lbarnard, Harrington De Witt 
Learned, Ernest Freeman . . 
Learned, Willis Lathrop . . . 
Leary, Charles Arthur . . . 
Leatherbee, Albert Thompson 
Leavitt, Henry Foss .... 
Le Baron, Frederic Nelson, A. Y. 

Lee, Walter Henry 

Lee, William Louis 

Leeds, Charles Tileston . . . 
Leiper, James Gerhard .... 
Lennan, Thomas Frank . . . 



L '97 Reading, Mass. 

HL *99 Newton Lower Falls, Mass. 

XHI. '98 I Robin Hood St., Dorchester. 

V. *97 8 Lester PI., Jamaica Plain, Mass.. 

S. Middletown, Pa. 

VL *97 II Merlin St., Dorchester, Mass. 

V. '99 South Framingham, Mass. 
S. 237 Park St., Newton, Mass. 

n. *99 24 Church St., Salem, Mass. 

S. 34 Savin St., Roxbury, Mass. 

H. '97 Hudson, Mass. 

V. *oo 38 Rosseter St., Dorchester, Mass. 

V. '98 1 140 Main St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

IV. *99 518 W. 5th St., Davenport, Iowa. 

X. '98 17 E. 69th St., New York City. 

S. Nevada, Mo. 

I. *98 1630 Linden Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

S. Granville, N. Y. 

X. *97 26 Mt. Vernon St.,Camb'ge, Mass. 

VH. *99 283 Pawtucket St., Lowell, Mass. 

S. 12 Story St., Cambridge, Mass. 

I. '98 Manchester, Mass. 

VIH. *98 Chiltonville, Plymouth, Mass. 

S. 5^09 Kimbark Ave., Chicago, 111. 

'00 1815 H. St.N.W.,Wa8h'gton, D C. 

I. '98 34 Foster St., Melrose, Mass. 

I. '99 10 Summer St-,Charlesto'n, Mass. 

VI. '97 259 Webster St., E. Boston, Mass. 
II. '98 60 N St., S. Boston, Mass. 

XIII. '00 47 M St., S. Boston, Mass. 

S. 59 Commonwealth Ave., Boston. 

VI. *99 Ayer, Mass. 

IV. '00 9 Brant St., Dorchester, Mass. 

III. '00 Campello, Mass. 

II. '00 28 W. Elm St., Brockton, Mass. 

II. '97 176 Macon St., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

S. 867 South St., Roslindale, Mass. 

S. 50 Worcester St., Boston. 

VI. '97 15 Irving St., Watertown, Mass. 

V. '98 15 Irving St., Watertown, Mass. 

II. *oo 79 Charles St., Waltham, Mass. 

'00 85 Westland Ave., Boston. 

I. '99 Saco, Me. 

IV. '97 7 Courtland St.,Middleboro, Mass. 
IV. '98 Home City, Ohio. 

VI. *97 1319 Hinman Ave., Evanston, 111. 

IV. *oo Newton, Mass. 

II. '99 1602 Masters St., Philadelphia, Pa. 

V. *99 Belmont, Mass. 



291 



NAME AND FRATERNITY. 



COURSE. CLASS. 



HOME ADDRESS. 



Leonard, Clifford Milton, A. T 
Leonard, Owen Lewis . . 
Lewis, Clancey Montana . 
Lewis, James Edward . . 
Lewis, Joseph Elliot . . 

Lewis, Rondei 

LirpiNCOTT, Jesse Treadwell 
LiNDSLEY, Frederick Clkland, 4» 
LiNGLEY, Robert Ross . . . 
Litchman, Harold Bartlett 
Little, Edmund Cook . . 

LiTTLEFIELD, HoMER . . . 

Locke, Harriet Frances . 
LoiiHiLLER, Harry John . . 
Lombard, Alfred Waldo . 
Lombard, Percival Hall, A.B. 
Long, John William . . . 
Long, Marcjarkt, A.B. . . 

Long, Zourie H 

Loom IS, Henry Meech . . 
Lord, Charles Edward 
Lord, Herbert Ivory, X. <l». 
LoRiNG, Conrad .... 
Loud, Ralph White . . . 
LovEjoY, Walter Livingston 
Loveland. Benjamin Alpheus 
LuMBERT, Rutherford Vipond 
LuNT, Robert Somerby . . . 
LuYTiEs, Otto Gerhard . . 
Lynch, George Edward . . 
Mabie, Harry Saxton, B.P. . 
MacBride, Jamie Douglas . . 
MacFarlane, David Huron . 
Mack, Harrington, 1". A. K. 
MacKeen, Isaac Abner . . . 
MacKoon, Frederic Hall . . 

Madero, Salvador 

Magee, Guy, Jr., il. X. . . . 

Magee, John, 2D 

Mague, Francis Joseph . . . 
Maguire, Joseph Travers . . 
Maguire, Thomas Francis Ja.vie 
Mahoney, Joseph Michael . . 
Manley, Sumner Marshall . 
Manning, Alice Lee .... 
Mansfield, Frank Erastus 
Manson, Ed.mund Sewall, Jr. 
Marshall, Herman Weston . 
Marshall, William Ada.mson 



B. 



I. 

V. 

III. 

I. 

H. 

V. 

X. 

I. 

II. 

III. 

IV. 

VI. 

s. 

H 

II. 

VI. 

VI. 

S. 

XIII. 



V. 

VI. 

V. 

II. 

s. 

III. 

I. 

I. 

X. 

VI. 

II. 
s. 

XIH. 
S. 

s. 
I. 

VI. 

s. 

I. 
II. 

I. 

VI. 
VI. 

II. 
s. 

L 
VIII. 

vn. 

X. 



*oo 2501 Michigan Ave., Chicago, 111. 

'98 Newton Centre, Mass. 

*99 Ketch urn, Idaho. 

'97 1357 B'dway, W.Somerville, Mass. 

'99 Centreville, Mass. 

'00 21 Hillside Ave., Maiden, Mass. 

'98 Mt. Auhurn, Cincinnati, Ohio. 

'00 1625 Conn. Ave., Wash'gt'n, D.C. 

'00 28 Ash St., Cambridge, Mass. 

'00 Marhlehead. Mass. 

'98 77 M.insur St., Lowell, Mass. 

'00 1813 3d Ave., West Trov, N. Y. 

Nashua, N. II. 
'00 21 Cranston St.. Jamaica Plain. 
'98 Wavland, Mass. 
'98 130 Newbury St., Boston, Mass. 
'00 71 Moulton St.,Charlesto*n, Mass. 

Hingham. Mass. 
•98 36 N. Franklin St., Wilkesbarre. 
'97 Yokohama, Japan. 
'98 63 Col'bus Ave.,Somerville, Mass. 
'98 71^ Howard Ave., Roxbury, Mass. 
'98 Kobe, Japan. 

Weymouth, Mass. 
109 Manner St., Buffalo, N. Y. 
Chatham, Mass. 
Newton Lower Falls, Mass. 
19 Pawn St., Newbury port, Mass. 
'00 328 E. 15th St., New York, N. Y. 
'99 48 Lincoln St., Hyde Park, Mass. 
41 Brown Ave., Roslindale, Mass. 
'(,9 Arlington Heights, Mass. 

85 Church Hill Ave., M'treal, Que. 
FortMirr, S. C. 
'00 Peabodv, Mass. 
'00 12 State St., Auburn, N. Y. 

Parras-Coahuila, .Mexico. 
'99 526 Cornelia Ave., Chicago, III. 
'99 Wen ham Depot, Mass. 
'00 West Newton, Mass. 
'00 8 Beale St., Dorchester, Mass. 
'97 8 Beale St., Dorchester, Mass. 
'97 21 Bailey St., Dorchester, Mass. 
'00 238 Liberty St., Brockton, Mass. 

Milton, Mass. 
'98 26 Cumberland St., Boston, Ma!»$. 
'97 7 Holliday St., Dorchester. Mass. 
'97 1 14 Highland St., Brockton, Mass. 
'98 Summit Ave., Brookline, Mass. 



•98 

•97 
•00 

•97 



292 



NAME AND FRATERNITY. 



COURSE. CLASS. 



HOME ADDRESS. 



Mason, Earl Potter .... 
Mathews, George Eugene 
Maxfield, Daniel Ellwood . 

Mayer, Durand 

Mayhew, Harold Baker . . 
McCarthy, George Herbert 
McCoNNELL, Walter Gardner 
McCormick, Edmund Burke 
McCrudden, Francis Henry 
McDonald, Charles Snead 
McDonald, James George . 
McGowAN, Krancis Xavier 
McIntosh, James William . 
McIntyre, James Sherwood 
McIver,Jean Bond, B.S. 

McJuNKiN, Paul 

McKell, William, Ph.B , X. * 
McMillan. John Primrose . 
McMaster, Herbert Milton 
McPherson, Herbert Austin 
Mead, Edwin Bradley . . 
Melcher, Arthur Clarke . 
Merriam, Charles Allen . 
Merrick, Charles Irving, A.B. 
Merrick, Frederic Ickes, X. ♦. 
Merrill, Albert Sidney 
Miller, Lewis Arthur . . 
Miller, Stuart Berwick . 
MiLLiKEN, Carl Spencer 
Milliken, Sumner Moulton 
Mills, Helen Curtis . . . 
Mills. Prescott Caldwell 
MiNARY, Thomas Helm . . 
MiNNiG, Frank Raymond, A. T 
Moebs, Joseph Julius . . . 
MoLLER, Albert Voltaire, A 
Mommers, Richard, X. *. 
Moody, George Barrell 
Moore, Clarence Alfred . 
MoRAN, George Austin . . 
Morgan, Carl Leon, i!. A. E. 
Morgan, Harold Loomis 
Mork, Harry Solomon . . 
Morrill, Edward F'rancis 
Morris, Henry Curtis . . 
Morris, William Longfellow 
Morse, Benjamin Fames 
Morse, Harry Leonard 
Morse, Henry Grant, Jr., A. 4^. 



12 
K 



E 



n. '97 Halidir Hall, Newport, R. L 

IV. '98 1624 E. Third St., Dayton, Ohio. 

II. '00 Amesbury.Mass. 

VI. '98 144 Madison Ave., New York City. 

I. *oo West Tisbury, Mass. 

IX. *97 W. Fuller St., Dorchester, Mass. 

XIII. '98 516 Warren St., Roxbury, Mass. 

H. '97 Normal, 111. 

V. *oo 134 Castle St., Boston, Mass. 
IV. *99 Louisville, Ky. 

HI. '00 4 Highland Park, Roxbury, Mass. 

II. '00 14 Berkeley St., Lawrence, Mass. 

II. '00 60 Sheridan St., Jamaica Plain. 

IV. '98 69 Willis St., New Bedford, Mass. 

S. 15S Beacon St., W^orcester, Mass. 

VIII. '98 62 Sherman St., Roxbury, Mass. 

IH. '98 Chillicothe, Ohio. 

X. '97 Petrolia, Ont. 

VI. 'co Portland, Oregon. 

XIII. '00 6 Garden St.. Medford, Mass. 

IV. »99 217 W. 7th St., Erie, Pa. 

V. *oo Newton Centre, Mass. 

H. *oo 163 Ashley Ave., Char'ston, S. C. 

S. Holyoke, Mass. 

IV. '00 1435 3d Ave., New Brighton, Pa. 

X. '00 II Florence St., Maiden, Mass. 

I. '00 North Easton, Mass. 

X. *oo 122 Hancock St., Camb*dge, Mass. 

VII. '99 414 Salem St., Maiden, Mass. 

I. '98 14 School St., Saco, Me. 

S. Sharon, Mass. 

II. '98 Arlington, Mass. 

VI. *oo 1054 2d St., Louisville, Ky. 

II. '98 615 Centre Ave., Reading, Pa. 

I. '98 235 Magnolia St., Dorchester. 

II. *oo Galveston, Texas. 

V. '98 South Manchester, Conn. 

XI H. '00 214 Broadway, Bangor, Me. 

X. '99 Arlington, Mass. 

V^. *97 So. Framingham, Mass. 

VI. '98 100 Mt. Vernon, Fitchburg, Mass. 

VI. '00 7 Lincoln St., Springfield, Mass. 

V. '99 19 Waumbeck St., Roxbury, Mass. 

VI. '98 80 Snow St., Fitchburg, Mass. 

III. '00 Hotel Mannett, Evanston, 111. 
VI. '99 i309Kene8aw Ave., Wash'n, D. C. 

II. '99 Canton, Mass. 

II.-VI. *99 8 Ashford St., Allston, Mass. 

IV. '99 800 Delaware Av., Wilm'ton, Del. 



293 



NAME AND FRATERNITY. 



COURSE. CLASS. 



HOME ADDRESS. 



S. 



B. 



Morton, Charles Edward, 2. A. E 
MoTCii, Edward Ramoxd . . 

MoTCH, Stanley 

Mott-Smith, Morton Churchill 
MouLTON, Walter Augustus . 
MuLHALL, Harold Torey . . 
MuHLKJ, James Fred .... 
Murray, Parnell Sidway . . 
Nathan, Albert Franklin, Jr. 
Neall, Newitt Jackson . . . 
Nebel, Herreros Alejandro, B. 
Neidich, Samuel A., Ph.B. 
Nelson, Alexander Howard, A. 
Nelson, William Bundy . . 
Nesmith, Thomas, Jr., A. T. A. 
Newbury, George Kellogg . 
Newell, Lester Allen . . . 
Newell, William Stark . . 
Newhall, Charles Alexander 
Newhall, Henry Borden, *. B. K 
NiCKfeRsoN, Clarendon . . 
Noble, Howard Agnew, X. <^. 

Nolte, Julius , 

Norris, Albert Perley . . 
Norris, Grace Adelaide 

North, Edward 

Norton, Clifford .... 
NoYEs, Harriet Niles . . 
Ober, Paul Joseph .... 
O'CoNNELL, Catherine . . 
Oelrich, Edward .... 
O'Hern. Timothy Cyril . . 
O'Leary, William H. J., A.M. 

Olin, Edwin Read 

Oliver, Marshall P., A.B., A. T 
Oppenheim, Robert Emmet 

Orr, Hugh 

Osgood, Edwin Putnam . . . 
Osgood, Harry Edmund . . . 
Osgood, Henry Douglas . . 

Osgood, Isaac 

OxNARD, Horace Whitcomb 
Packard, Alpheus Appleton . 
Packard, Edwin Augustus 
Pakard, Leonard Warren 
Page, Charles Barnard . . 

Page, Walter, A. ^ 

Paget, John Wallace . . . 
Paige, Ellwood Bryant . . 



IL 

H. 

H. 

VL 

V. 

VL 

H. 

S. 

X. 

H. 

S. 

X. 

s. 

VL 

H. 

XHL 

HL 

XHL 

S. 
VL 

X. 

H. 

H. 

V. 

S. 
HL 

H. 

S. 
VH. 

S. 
IV. 

X. 
VI. 



IV. 

II. 

IV. 

XL 

IL 

XL 

IL 

I. 

HI. 

H. 

VI. 

XHL 

XIII. 

IL 

IV. 



'oo 

'97 

*99 

'99 
'oo 

'97 
•98 

'99 
'00 

'9S 
'98 

'9S 
'00 
98 

'99 
'99 

•98 
'97 
'97 
'98 
'97 

'00 
'00 

'00 

•99 

•99 

'99 

•97 

•97 
•00 

•97 

'97 

'00 

'98 
'00 

*oo 

'98 

'99 
•98 

'99 

•97 
00 

•98 



Webster, Mass. 

1553 Madison Av., Covington, Kv. 
1553 Madison Av., Covington, Kj. 
911 Boylston St., Boston, Mass. 
16 Beach St., Dorchester, Mass. 
9 Laurel St., Dorchester, Mass. 

42 N. Main St., Natick, Mass 
2 Akron PI., Roxbury, Mass. 
V^irginia Hotel, Kansas City, Mo. 
Altoona, Pa. 

Santiago, Chile. 

12 W. High St., Carlisle, Pa. 

Chambersburgh, Pa. 

14 Boyls'n Terrace, Jamaica Plain. 

2 Park St., Lowell, Mass. 

125 W.Franklin St., Jackson, Mich. 

Southbridge, Mass. 

65 Church St., Winchester, Mass. 

25 Wales St., Dorchester, Mass. 

150 E. 7th St., Plainfield, N. J. 

16 Courtland St. , B'dgeport, Conn. 

5716 Howe St., Pittsburg, Pa. 

803 Centre St., Jamaica PI., Mass. 

760 Mass. Ave., Cambridgeport. 

129 Chestnut St., Chelsea, Mass. 

Edgehill Road, Brookline, Mass. 

6 Mansfield St., Everett, Mass. 

Mattoon, 111. 

748 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 

79 Chapman, Charlestown, Mass. 

751 7th St., Buffalo, N. Y. 

43 Cedar St., N. Camb*dge, Mass. 
Richibucto, N. B. 

29 St. James St., Roxbury, Mass. 
Annapolis, Md. 

24 E. 46lh St., New York, N. Y. 
207 Court St., Brockton, Mass. 
200 W. Br'kline St., Boston, Mass. 
272 Irving Ave., Chicago, III. 
200 W. Br'kline St., Boston, Mass. 
North Andover, Mass. 
Norway, Me. 

275 Angeel St., Providence, R. L 
Mansfield, Mass. 
229 Bay St., Taunton, Mass. 
259 Wash'n St., Dorchester, Mass. 
253 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 
II Beale St., Dorchester, Mass. 
50 Chatham St., Lynn, Mass. 



294 



NAMB AND FRATERNITY. 



COUR8B. CLASS. 



BOMB ADDRBSS. 



Paine, Charles Bodwkll, i). X. 
Palmer, Worthington, A. K. K 
Parker, William Edward . 
Parker, Will Rogers . . 
Parker, William T., Jr., ^. ^ 
Parsons, Willis Everett . 
Parsons, Arciiihald Livingston 
Patch, James Alfred . . 
Paul, Charles Edward . . 
Pease, Charles Henry . . 
Peavey, Leroy Deering . . 
Pechin, John Shelley, i. X. 
Peck, Arthur Stearns . . 
Peircb, Vernon Marshall . 
Penard, Thomas Edward 
Pbndell, Charles William 
Pennock, George Alger 
Perkins, George Hawthorne 
Perkins, John McClary, Jr. 
Perley, William Marshall 
Perry, Frank Bridgham 
Pettee, Charles Leslie Wight 
Phalen, William Clifton 
Phelps, Earle Bernard 
Philbrick, Shirley Seavey 
Phoenix, Amy Elizabeth . 
Pierce, Edward Everett . 
Pigeon, William Gardner 
Pigman, George Wood, Jr. 
Pike, Otto Samuel . . . 
Pinkham, Ralph Howard 
Pitcher, Edmund Henry 
Plumb, Ralph, A. ^k. . . , 
Plummer, Howard Clark . 
Porter, Arthur Felix . . 
Porter, John Lewis . . . 
Porter, Russell Williams 
Portner, Robert Francis . 
Potter, Myron Prescott . 
Potter, Sarah Emeline 
Potter, William Chapman, A. K 
Potts, Louis Joseph, A.B. . 
Pratt, Gilbert Homer . . 
Pratt, Robert VVinthrop, Jr. 
Pray, Dudley Malcolm . . 
Price, Williard Atherton 
Priest, Benson Bulkeley . 
Priest, George Heywood . 
Priest, Russell Parker 



E 



E 



IV. *97 76 State St., Augusta, Me. 

IV. '99 272 State St., Albany, N. Y. 

I. *99 Newtonville, Mass. 

VI. '98 109 Islington St., PortsmUh, N. H. 

IX. '97 Crescent Hill, Springfield, Mass. 

S. '97 32 Middle St., Gloucester. Mass. 

I. '97 Derry, N. H. 

X. '99 Stoneham, Mass. 

II. *oo 36 High St., Belfast, Me. 

II. *9S Marlboro, N. H. 

I. *98 Exeter, N. H. 

II. '97 587 Prospect St., Cleveland, Ohio. 

III. *oo Wellington, Mass. 

I. '97 169 W. Newton St., Boston, Mass. 

VI, '00 Paramaribo, D. G. 

VI. '98 Cleburne, Texas. 

II. '99 Wes>ton, Mass. 

II. '99 iS Brown St., Salem, Mass. 

VI. '00 Arlington Heights, Mass. 

V. '98 74 Riverside Ave., Medford, Mass. 

II. '98 60 Laurel Hill Av., Norwich, Conn. 

V. *97 Newtonville, Mass. 

V. '99 13 Sadler St., Gloucester, Mass. 

V. '99 New Brunswick, N. J. 

II. '98 Rye Beach, N. H. 

S. 45 Concord Sq., Boston, Mass. 

XIII. '99 70 Cedar St., Maiden, Mass. 

IV. '00 139 Trenton St., E. Boston, Mass. 
VI. '00 Washington, D. C. 

II. '97 2 Park PI., Maiden, Mass. 

I. *99 175 Amory St., Roxbury, Mass. 

II. *oo Keene, N. H. 

II. *oo 267 Linwood Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

III. '00 Milton, Mass. 

V. '98 16 Neponset Ave., Hyde Park. 

VI. *oo 15 Quincy St., North Adams, Mass. 

S. Springfield, Vt. 

VI. '98 1 104 Vermont Ave., Washington. 

I. *oo 7 Holly St., Salem, Mass. 

S. Acworth, N. H. 

III. *97 4832 Madison Ave., Chicago, 111. 

VI. '99 Navy Yard, Charlestown, Mass. 

V. *97 39 Hancock St., Chelsea, Mass. 

I. '98 Waban, Mass. 

I. '99 508 Broadway, South Boston,Mass. 

I- *99 '370 Race St., Denver, Col. 

I. '98 Littleton, Mass. 

^' *99 5^ Prospect St., Waltham, Mass. 

L '00 33 Cedar St., Maiden, Mass. 



295 



NAME AND PRATERNITV. 



COURSE. CLASS. 



HOME ADDRESS. 



Priest, Warren Albert . . 
Prime, Harold Augustus . . 
Proctor, Alfred Waters . . 
Proctor, Charles Frederic . 
Prosser, Reay Cooper . . 
PuGH, Achilles Henry . . . 
Putnam, Wm. Edward, Jr., A.B. 
Rabbeth, Walter Esmond 
Rand, Nathaniel Dwkjht . . 
Rapp, Walter Louis, A. T. 
Real y Gaillard Juan, A.B. . 
Reardon, Thomas Fred. Eugene 

Redman, Artille 

Reed, William Edgar . . . 
Regestein, Ernest Alhrecht 
Reimer, Arthur Adams 
Remington, Woi.cott . . 
* Renshaw, Clarence .... 

Rich, Lamont 

Richards, Louis Jerome, A. K. K 
Richardson, Chester Augustus 
Richardson, Clinton Leroy . 
Richardson, Edward Bridge, A 
Richardson, Frank Linden . 
Richardson, James Herbert . 
Richardson, Maurice Frederic 
Richardson, Philip, A.B. . . 
Rich.mond, Gerald Martin, A. A 
Richmond, Henry Parsons 
Richmond, Miles Standish, A. 1 
RicKARDs. Burt Ransom 
Riddle, Herbert Hugh . 
Riddle. Lewis Wetmore 
Riker, George Hayes 
Riley, Joseph Cains, Jr. 
Ritchie, Edward Warren 
Roberts, Robert Parker 
Robertson, Samuel Brown 
Robinson, Argyle E., A. K. E. 
Robinson, Elmer Holbrook . 
Robinson, George Avery, A. ^ 
Robinson, John Tilden, Jr. 
Robinson, Laforest George . 
RoBiNso.x, Thos. Pendleton, *. B 
Robinson, William Attmore,Jr 
RoBsoN, Edward Riggs . 
RoGERsoN, John Russell 
Rolfe, Henry Pettingell 
Rood, Norman Paul . . 



a» 



V. 
VL 
VL 

s. 

IV. 
X. 

IV. 

H. 

VL 

IV. 

I. 
VI. 

I. 
VI. 
VI. 

I. 
VI. 
VI. 

S. 
X[. 

L 

I. 
VL 

S. 

I. 
H. 

S. 
IV. 
IV. 
IV. 
V. 
IV. 
XIII. 



\ 



11. 

s. 

HI. 

I. 

IV 

VI. 

IV. 

II. 

VL 

II. 

II. 

I. 

I. 

S. 

IV. 

296 



'99 100 Homestead St., Roxbury. 
'98 434 Wabhington St., Brighton. 
'99 219 W. Springfield St., Boston. 

247 W. Newton St., Boston, Mass. 
'9S St. Louis, Mo. 
'97 Madison Pike, Cincinnati, Ohio. 
'9S Clark Road, Brookline, Mass. 
'00 67 Crawford St., Roxbury, Mass. 
'00 Watertown, Mass. 
'00 1339 Chapel St., Cincinnati, Ohio. 
'99 Santiago de Cuba. 
'00 Welleslcy, Mass. 
'00 Belfast, Me. 

'97 4609 Centre Ave., Pittsburg, Pa. 
'99 92 Wyinan St., Jamaica Plain. 
'00 28 N. Maple Ave., E. Orange, N.J. 
'00 Windsor, Conn. 

1910 Park Ave., Baltimore, Md. 

85 W. Main St., N. Adams, Mass. 

269 Broadway, Norwich, Conn. 

Pel ham, N. H. 

Winchester, Mass. 

155 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

Concord, Mass. 

Newtonville, Mass. 

East Providence, R. I. 

Cottage St., Brookline, Mass. 
99 3^ ^'"S S^-* Worcester, Mass. 
'98 East Providence, R. I. 
'99 Clinton Road, Brookline, Mass. 
'99 70 Wyoming Ave., Maiden, Mass. 
'99 2535 Indiana Ave., Chicago, 111. 
'99 -535 Indiana Ave., Chicago, III. 

Belmont St., Somerville, Mass. 

Allen St., Roslindale, Mass. 

Newton Highlands, Mass. 
'00 42 Qiiincy St., Roxbury, Mass. 
'99 East Milton, Mass. 
'97 5406 Jefferson Ave., Chicago, III. 
'97 Reading, Mass. 
'99 518 W. Main St., Louisville, Ky. 
'9'^ 33 Child St., Hyde Park, Mass. 
'97 181 Margaret St., Plattsb'gh, N.Y. 
99 3^29 Page St., Philadelphia, Pa. 
■9S 84 Hawthorne St., New Bedford. 
'99 Wellesley Hills, Mass. 
*97 Mansfield, Mass. 

27 High St., Newburyport, Mass, 
'99 Madisonville, Ohio. 



99 

'97 
"oo 

•ix> 

•98 
•99 

'99 



•99 
•98 



NAME AND FRATERNITY. 



COURSE. CLASS. 



HOME ADDRESS. 



B. 



RooKK, Warren Augustus 
Ross, Sidney Fuller . . . 

ROSSMASSLER, RiCHARD CaRL 

RoYCE, James Charles 
RuMERY, Ralph Rollins, 6 
Russ, Ernest Frank . . 
Russell, Benjamin F. W. 
Russell, Edward Francis 
Russell, George Edmond 
Russell, Walter Basford 
Rutherford, Eugene White 
Ryan, Ida Annah .... 
Samuels, Edwin Francis 
Sanchez y Batista, Pedro, 6. 
Sanders, Warren Willard 
Sargent, Albert Ellwood 
Sargent, Homer Earle, Jr., Ph. 
Saunders, William Colegrove 
Sawin, Luther Robinson . . 
Sawtelle, Harry Francis 
Sawtelle, William Otis, A. K. E 
Sawyer, Haven, A. K. E. 
Sawyer, Horace Russell 
Sawyer, Ralph Edmund, ♦. B. E. 
Schlegelmilch, Leo William, Jr. 

Schlesinger, Helen 

Schmidt, Albert George Anton 
Schmidt, Herman Henry . . 

SCHNELLER, GeORGE OtTO, X. *. 

Schroeder, Ernest Herman . 

SCHUTTLER, CaRL, X. *. . . . 

Schwartz, David 

Scott, Ben Embry 

Scott, Henry Francis . . . 

Scott, Walter 

Scudder, Hayward, B.A. . . 
Sbarle, Lewen Firth . . . 
Sears, Joseph Homer . . . 
Sears, Stanley Collamore 
Seaver, Henry Morse . . . 

Sbaver, Kenneth 

Seavey, Norman Emery . . . 
Seidensticker, Lewis Jerome 
Sellew, William Hamilton . 
Shapley, Harry Tilton . . 
Shaw, Albion Walker . . . 
Shaw, Brackley Azel . . . 
Sheak, Edwin Ruthven, 6. £. 
Shedd, Albert Rix .... 



IV. 

IV. 

XHI. 

II. 

S. 
IX. 
IV. 

II. 
I. 

II. 

S. 

S. 

II. 

II. 

V. 

S. 
VI. 

II. 

V. 

I. 

VIII. 

II. 

II. 

S. 
IIL 

S. 

II. 

S. 

II. 
IV. 

11. 

V. 
VI. 

II. 
II. 

s. 

I. 

V. 

III. 
s. 
I. 

VI. 
V. 

II. 

X. 

VI. 
IX. 
IX. 

II. 



'97 8 1 Crown St., Meriden, Conn, 
'oo Kennebunk, Me. 
*oo Mill & Cedar Sts., Germant'n, Pa. 
*97 Davenport, Ontario. 

380 Danforth St., Portland, Me. 
'98 193 W. Brookline St., Boston. 
'98 Concord Junction, Mass. 
*99 650 Middlesex St., Lowell, Mass. 
*oo 85 Montvale Ave., Woburn, Mass. 
'97 4 Paulding St., Roxbury, Mass. 

231 Jefferson Av., Brooklyn, N. Y. 

19 Hammond St., Waltham, Mass. 
*99 21 Austin St., Hyde Park, Mass. 
*99 Nuevitas, Cuba. 
'00 West Gardner, Mass. 

Belmont, Mass. 
*9S Lexington Hotel, Chicago, 111. 
*oo 67 Peter Parley St. , Jamaica Plain. 
*97 34 Robbins St., Waltham, Mass. 
'97 12 Magazine St., Cambridgeport. 
*97 50 Penobscot St., Bangor, Me. 
*99 64 Forest Ave., Bangor, Me. 
'99 Rye Beach, N. II. 

196 Walnut Ave., Roxbury, Mass. 
'oo 32 Mt. Pleasant Ave., Roxbury. 

Brookline, Mass. 
'00 1537 Oakdale Ave., Chicago, 111. 

Melville, N. Y. 
'00 103 S. Cliff St., Antonio, Conn. 
'98 1608 South St., Omaha, Neb. 
*97 287 W. Adams St., Chicago, 111. 
'97 10 Wall St., Boston, Mass. 
'00 loio Louisiana St. , Lit. Rock, Ark. 
'98 38 Prospect St., Brockton, Mass. 
'00 25 Bradford St., Lawrence, Mass. 

21 E. 22d St., New York City. 
*oo 83 May St., Lawrence, Mass. 
*98 East Dennis, Mass. 
*oo Winthrop, Mass. 

Bellevue St., West Roxbury, Mass. 
*oo Woodstock, Vt. 
*99 Dover, N. H. 

*98 95^1 Inman St., Cambridge, Mass. 
*97 608 Forest Ave., Avondale, Ohio. 
*oo 32 Orchard St., Leominster, Mass. 
'98 25 Pierce St., Maiden, Mass. 
'00 Englewood Ave., Brighton, Mass. 
'99 Reading, Mass. 
'98 Silver Creek, N. Y. 



297 



NAME AND FRATERNITY. 



COURSE. CLASS. 



HOME ADDRESS. 



Sherman, Charles Edwin, A. T. 
Sherman, Edward Clayton 
Sherman, Henry Arthur . 
Sherrill, Miles Standish 
Shumaker, Louis William 
Shuman, Jesse Wyman, A. T 
Sibley, Edward Warren 
SicKMAN, James Francis, 2. X. 
Silverman, Mortimer 
Sites, Frederick Robert 
Skinner, Charles Jernegan 
Skinner, Hervey Judson 
Slavens, John Heber . . 
Slocum, William Whitake 
Smith, Charles Alfred 
Smith, Charles Edward 
Smith, Charles Franklin, 2 
Smith, Charles Henry . 
Smith, George Lawrence, A.B. 
Smith, Godfrey Lewis . 
Smith, Granville, A. T. 
Smith, Harrison W., A.B., A. T. 
Smith, Harry Austin 
Smith, Herbert Edwards, S. B. 
Smith, Horace Tilden . 
Smith, James Wilfred . 
Smith, Montfort Hill, A. T. A. 
Smith, Oren Barron, Jr. 
Smith, Percy Merrihew 
Smith, Sumner Ives . . 
Smith, Theodore Brooks 
Smith, William Franklin 
Smith, William Graves 
Smith, William Henry . 
Smithvvick, Harold . . 
Smyser, Albert Ernest, S.B. 
Smyser, James Swett, S.B., A. K 
Snow, Frank Whipple . 
Snow, Frederick Willis 
SoHiER, Louis Amory . . 
SouLE, Horace Webster 
SouLE, Lawrence Clement 
southworth, frederic willard 
Spaulding, Frank Alger 
Spear, Walter Evans . . 
Sperry, Marcy Leavenworth 
Spiess, Arthur Douglas 
Sprague, James Paddock 
Spring, Russell Clark . 



£ 



E 



IV. 
I. 

in. 

V. 
VI. 
VI. 

II. 

I. 

VI. 

I. 
I. 

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IH. 
I 

I. 

I. 

XI. 

II. 

IV. 

XIII. 

XIII. 

VI-II. 

II. 

s. 

V. 

XIII. 

IV. 

III. 
II. 

VI. 
VI. 

II. 
I. 
II. 
II. 
s. 
s. 
s. 

VII. 

II. 
II. 

X. 

IV. 

I. 

XI. 

I. 

IV. 
IV. 
IV. 



'99 
•98 
•98 



'98 
'97 



*oo 46 Granite St., Westerly, R. I. 

*98 35 Langdon St., Cambridge, Mass. 

'97 470 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. 

'99 301 E. Cottage St., Louisville, Ky. 

*99 Ortonville, Minn. 

'97 1401 Chicago Ave., Minneapolis. 

*99 Weston, Mass. 

'98 215 Oak St., Holj'oke, Mass. 

*oo 172 Locust St., Allegheny, Pa. 

99 491 Carleton St., Newton, Mass. 

'98 Ottawa, Kansas. 

*99 Wakefield, Mass. 

'98 334BaltimoreAv. ,KansasCity,Mo. 

'99 East Providence, R. I. 

'99 Reading, Mass. 

261 WashHon, Somerville, Mass. 

1512 R St., N. W. Wash*ton, D. C. 

io7WarrenSt.,Charlestown,Mass. 
'98 64 Sparks St., Cambridge, Mass. 
*9S I Elmwood St., Roxbury, Mass. 

2137 L St., N. W. Wash'ton, D. C. 

40 Mill St., Dorchester, Mass. 

Wakefield, Mass. 

19 Liberty St., Gloucester, Mass. 
'98 East Bridgewater, Mass. 
'97 85 Concord St., Lawrence, Mass. 
'99 Falmouth. 

'97 55 Massasoit, Northampton, Mass. 
'97 Rockland, Mass. 
*oo 107 3d St., Elkhart, Ind. 
*98 39 Hawth'ne Av., Cleveland, Ohio. 
*97 3 White St., N. Cambridge, Mass. 
*97 Mansfield, Mass. 

1823 14th Ave., Altoona, Pa. 

New Castle, Me. 

6 Wellington Terrace, Brookline. 

6 Wellington Terrace, Brookline. 

21 Charter St., Newbu ry p'rt, Mass. 

565 Essex St., Lynn, Mass. 

Concord, Mass. 

22 Loring St., Somerville, Mass. 

Newtonville, Mass. 

W. Stoughton, Mass. 
'98 West Stockbridge, Mass. 
*97 53 Camb'dge St., Lawrence, Mass. 
'CO Navy Yard, New York, N. Y. 
'97 2 E. 15th St., New York, N. Y. 
*oo 1804 Summit St., Kansas City, Mo. 
'97 Newton Lower Falls, Mass. 



'99 



'99 

'99 

'99 

'99 
'00 



298 



NAMB AND FKATBRNXTY. 



COURSB. CLASS. 



HOMB ADDKB8S. 



SpRiNGERt Ernest Roger . 
Staples, William Deering, 2 
Starbuck, George Franklin 
Stark, Helen Gertrude . 
Starr, Herbert Harris 
Stearns, Frederic Baldwin 
Stearns, Herbert Richardson 
Stebbins, Charles Bowles . 
Stebbins, Rowland Williams, A 
Steffens, William Frederick 
Steidemann, Theodore William 
Steiner, Klaus Junior . . . 
Stetson, James Alexander, £. A 
Stevens, Gorham Phillips 

Stevens, Ralph 

Stevens, William Leonard 
Stevens, William Wentworth 
Stewart, Lewis, A. ^. . . 
Stiles, Percy Goldthwait 
Stillings, Samuel Warren 
Stockton, Philip, A.B. . . 
Stone, Jacob, Jr., A. Y. . . 
Stone, Willard Wilberforce 
Stouder, John Burton, B.E. 
Stratton, Charles Heywood 
Street, Gerald Basil, 4>. 6. E 
Streng, Lewis Starr . . 
Strickland, William R., A. T. 
Strong, Mary Baker . . . 
Strout, Robert Wheelock 
Stuart, Harve Reed . . . 
Sturtevant, Edward, 9. H. 
Sturtevant, Mary .... 
Stutchkoff, Samuel . . . 
SuHR, Carl Frederick . . 
Sullivan, Henry Howard . 

SuTER, Russell 

Sutermeister, Edwin . . . 
Sutliff, Walter Hannen . 
Swan, Clifford Melville . 
SwASEY, Albert Loring, A. S* 
Sweetser, Charles H., 2. A. K 
Swift, Charles Williston 
Swift, Frank Robinson . . 

SWINSON, JOHANNAH ChARLOTTE 

Tallmadge, Thomas Eddy, 4». B. 

Tappan, Frederic 

Taylor, Denzil Hollis . . . 
Taylor, Edward Molineux, *. B 



£ 



E. 



VL '98 67 Arlington St., Newton, Mass. 

VI. '98 645-A Congress St., Portland, Me. 

II' '97 43 Lexington St., Waltham. 

S. Navy Yard, Charlestown, Mass. 

I. *99 16 Richards St., New London, Ct. 
IV. *99 641 Wash'ton St., Brookline, Mass. 

I. '00 108 Cushing Ave., D., Mass. 

XIII. '97 30 Day St., W. Somerville, Mass. 

VI. '99 Crescent Hill, Springfield, Mass. 

I. '98 137 W. Concord St., Boston, Mass. 

IV. '00 41 10 N. nth St., St. Louis, Mo. 

III. '97 58 Washington St., Allegheny, Pa. 
I. '99 67 Bedford St. ,New Bedford, Mass. 

IV. '98 26 Gray St., Cambridge, Mass. 
III. *oo Whitman, Mass. 

III. *oo 74 Walnut St., Somerville, Mass. 

IV. '98 268 Summer St., Lynn, Mass. 
IV. '00 208 W. State St., Trenton, N. J. 

VII. '97 168 Walnut St., Newtonville,Mass. 

IV. *98 205 St. Botolph St., Boston, Mass. 

I. '99 390 Beacon St., Boston. 

IV. '99 3 Pond St., Newburyport, Mass. 

I. '00 12 Somerset Ave., Taunton, Mass. 

I. '97 Gravity, Iowa. 

IV. *oo Gardner, Mass. 

II. '99 Highland Park, 111. 

VI. '98 1656 Third Ave., Louisville. 

I. '98 Philbrick Road, Brookline, Mass. 

S. 258 Beacon St., Boston, Mass. 

II. '00 22 Linden St., Salem, Mass. 

S. Newark, N. Y. 

IX. '98 77 Mommouth St., Brookline. 

S. 77 Mommouth St., Brookline. 

II. *99 1043 Washington St., Boston. 

II. *oo 77 Chester Ave., Chelsea, Mass. 

II. '98 98 Foster St., Brighton, Mass. 

I. '00 St. Louis, Mo. 

V. *99 Readville, Mass. 

IV. *99 161 Lancaster St., Albany, N. Y. 

V. *99 91 Babcock St., Brookline, Mass. 

XIII. '98 146 High St., Taunton, Mass. 

S. 27 Lawrence St., Wakefield, Mass. 

II. '98 Provincetown, Mass. 

^' *99 575 Delaware Ave., Buffalo, N. Y. 

V. *oo Wellesley, Mass. 

VI. '98 1631 Hinman Ave., Evanston, 111. 

VI. *99 171 Newbury St., Boston, Mass. 

I. '99 Peterboro, N. H. 

H. '98 66 Garden St., Poughkeepsie,N.Y. 



299 



NAME AND FRATBRNITY. 

Taylor, John 

Taylor, Mark Elliott . . . 
Tew, William Henry, A. K. E. 
Thanisch, Otto Conrad . . 
Thayer, Harry Martin . . . 
Thayer, Horace Richmond 
Thompson, Maurice de Kay, A. K 
Thomson, Mary Jane .... 
Thurber, Clinton Draper 

TiETiG, Rudolph 

Tiffany, George Stanton, A. ^, 
TiLTON, Mary Azuba* .... 
TiNKHAM, Edgar Luther, B.P. 

Todd, Thomas, Jr 

Tone, Jay Erwin 

ToRREY, Charles Augustine, Jr 
Tower, Samuel Francis, A.B. 
Tower, Walter Russell . . 
TowNSEND, George Richards, A 
Trask, Edgar Pierce .... 
Treat, George Winfield . . 
Trumbull, Morris Kinnard, B. B 
Tubes, Henry Welles, X. *. . 
Tuck, Theodore Calvin . . . 
Tucker, Albert William . . 
Tucker, Atherton Howe . . 
Tucker, Frank Stevenson . . 
Tucker, Fred Irving .... 
Tucker-Cornell, Idair . 
Tudbury, Warren Chamberlain- 
Tufts, John Lawrence . . . 

Turner, Lawrie Humphrey 

Tweedy, George Augustus 

Twombly, Fred Henry . . . 

Tyler, Lueius Spaulding, 2. X. 

Ulke, Darwin 

Ulmer, George Frederick, X. <l». 

Underwood, Frank Edward . 

Underwood, Howard Coggin 

Underwood, William Lyman . 

Usher, Susannah 

Valhkamp, Henry Rudolph 

ViDETo, Theodore Ernest . . 

ViNAL, Ralph Sumner . . . 

ViNiNG, Robert McAllaster . 

VoGEL, Emil Frederick . . . 

VoGT, Oscar George .... 

Waddell, Fred Creelan . . 

Wadleigh, George Robinson 



COURSE. CLASS 



HOME ADDRESS. 



£ 



II 



VL 
VHL 

n. 

H. 

V. 

L 

vni. 

V. 

L 
IV. 

H. 

S. 
VI. 

II. 



V. 

s. 
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XHI. 

XIII. 

I. 

I. 

IV. 

I. 

HI. 

IV. 

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V. 

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IX. 

VI. 

VI. 

V. 

II. 
II. 
s. 
s. 
s. 

IV. 
IV. 

II. 
I. 

IV. 

I. 
II. 



'97 
*98 
'98 
'00 
'00 



294 Walnut St., Brookline, Mass. 
47 Lincoln St., H^^dc Park, Mass. 
418 Spring St., Jamestown, N. Y. 
3305 Wash'n St., Jamaica Plain. 
34 Hunt St., Brockton, Mass. 



'98 Blackstone, Mass. 
'98 

'97 



508 Greenup St., Covington, Ky. 

224W. Torsey St., Elizabeth, N.J. 
'00 592 Tremont St., Boston, Mass. 
'98 419 Rockdale Ave., Cincinnati, O. 
'00 1705 Conn. Av.,Washington,D.C. 

Concord, Mass. 
'97 37 Courtland St., Providence, R. I. 
'99 Concord, Mass. 
'97 1427 Woodl'nd Av.,Des Moines, la. 
'98 Lynnfield, Mass. 

English High School, Boston. 
'00 Auburndale, Mass. 
'99 287 Pearl St., New York City. 
'99 Peabody, Mass. 
'98 Livermore Falls, Me. 
'97 4544 Oakenwald Ave., Chicago. 
*oo Kingston, Pa. 

'00 57 Portland St., Haverhill, Mass. 
'98 Summit PL, Nevvburyport, Mass. 
'98 1079 Adams St. , Dorchester, Mass. 

Marblehead, Mass. 
'00 222 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. 

22 Pleasant St., Salem, Mass. 
'00 40 Warren St., Salem, Mass. 
*99 50 Woodbine St., Roxbury, Mass. 
'99 39 Salem St., Medford, Mass. 
'00 Los Angeles, Cal. 
*98 Newton Centre, Mass. 
*97 254 Linden St., Waltham, Mass. 
'00 411 15th St., N. W. Wash'n, D. C. 
'98 82 Cliff St., Norwich, Conn. 
'97 Auburndale, Mass. 
'98 Natick, Mass. 
Belmont, Mass. 

9 Kirkland PI., Cambridge, Mass. 
2210 Miami St., St. Louis, Mo. 
'97 S. Framingham, Mass. 
'97 42 Warren Ave., Brockton, Mass. 
'98 South Weymouth, Mass. 
*oo 40 Hartwell St., Roxbury, Mass. 
'99 607 East St., N. W., Washington. 
*99 Rockport, Mass. 
*97 Fountain St., West Newton, Mast. 



300 



NAMK AND PRATBKNITY. 



COURSB. CLASS. 



HOME ADDRESS. 



E. 



Wadsworth, George Reed« A 
Walker, Clarence Howard 
Wallace, Robert Bruce* A. T 

Walls, John 

Walters, Edward Philip 
Walther, William John 
Walton, James Henry, Jr. 
Ward, Ward Wellington, A. T. 
Warren, Frank Dinsmore 
Warren, John Edward . 
Washburn, Thurlow, A. K. 
Wastcoat, Richard . . 
Waterson, Karl William 
Watkins, Frederick Arthur 
Watrous, Charles Albert, *. B 
Watts, Francis Henry . 
Weaver, Erasmus Morgan 
Wedlock, William Henry 
Weeden, Walter Leslie 
Weeks, Irving Chambers 
Weeks, Merle .... 
Weimer, Edgar Arthur 
Welbourn, Edward Hambleton 
Wells, Walter Wiley . . 
Wentworth, John Frank 
Werner, Frank Albert, 2. X. 
Wessel,John Frederick, a. B 
Wesson, Leonard .... 
Wesson, Paul Bancroft 
West, William Eaton, *. B. E 
Westcott, Jennie Smith 
Weymouth, Thomas Rote, A. 
Whitaker, Lewis Rose . . 
White, Arthur Burr . . 
White, Harry Keith . . . 
White, William .... 
Whitehouse, Morris Homans 
Whiting, Eleanor Felton 
Whitman, Nathan Davis . 
Whitney, Walter Cummings 
Whiton, David Thomas . . 
Whitten, Roscoe Benjamin 
Whitten, William Henry, Jr., S 
Wiard, Edward Saxon . 
Wickes, Lewis Webster 
Wightman, Fred . . . 
WiGNALL, Lily .... 
Wilder, Clifton White 
Wilder, Ralph Edward 



E 



.B 



L 

II. 

XIII. 

S. 

V. 

I. 

V. 

IV. 

II. 

II. 

III. 

I. 

VI. 

VI. 

IV. 

I. 

s. 

I. 

II. 

IX. 
IV. 

II. 
II. 

VI. 
XIII. 
XIII. 

VI. 

II. 
II. 

V. 

s. 

VI. 

II. 

X. 

IV. 

V. 

IV. 

s. 

XI. 

I. 
II. 

IV. 

s. 
s. 
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'98 

'99 

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'99 

'97 

'99 

'98 
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'98 

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'98 
'99 
'99 
'97 

'99 

'00 
•00 

'99 
•98 

•00 

•99 
•00 

'99 
•98 
•00 

•98 

'99 

•97 

'99 
'00 

•99 
'98 



•00 

'99 
•97 
'98 



'00 

•99 

'98 
•98 



29 Beaver St., Keene, N. H. 

Rumford, R. I. 

120 Viaduct, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Lewisburg, Pa. 

42 Camp St., Providence, R. I. 

929 N. Halsted St., Chicago, 111. 

13 Coelin St.,Newburyport, Mass. 
Wyandotte, Mich. 

22 Pleasant St., Northboro, Mass. 
Foxvale, Mass. 

31 Lee St., Cambridge, Mass. 
Taunton, Mass. 

31 Bellevue St., Lowell, Mass. 
333 Rush St., Chicago, 111. 
672 17th St., Des Moines. 
Natick, Mass. 

Fort Warren, Mass. 

4 VVeldon St., Roxbury, Mass. 

14 S. 6th St., New Bedford, Mass. 

7 Holburn St., Roxbury, Mass. 
loii N. H. Ave., Washington. 
Lebanon, Pa. 

i639N.Colvert St., Baltimore, Md. 
Sackville, N. B. 

Rochester, N. H. 

530 W. Market St., Akron, Ohio. 

436 N. Summer St., Nashville. 

21 Rockville Park, Roxbury,Mas8. 

Tyngsboro, Mass. 

24 RockinhamSt. ,Cambridgeport. 

171 Massachusetts Ave., Boston. 

56 W. Main St., Lock Haven, Pa. 

Parsons St., Brighton, Mass. 

West Newton, Mass. 

32 N. Main St., Brattleboro, Vt. 
195 Cohannet St., Taunton, Mass. 
175 14th St., Portland, Ore. 
Trinity Court, Boston, Mass. 
455 Broadway, S. Boston, Mass. 
54 Jefferson St., Newton, Mass. 
Hingham Centre, Mass. 

129 Brooks St., E. Boston, Mass. 
59 School St., Roxbury, Mass. 
78 Chandler St., Boston, Mass. 
602 No. Ewing St., Helena, Mont. 
Oskaloosa, Iowa. 
20 St. James Ave., Boston, Mass. 

8 Gardner PI., Leominster, Mass. 
3 Sunset Av., Jamaica Plain, Mass. 



301 



NAMB AND FRATBRNITY. 



COURSB. CLASS. 



HOMB ADDRBSS. 



Wilder, William Alphonso . . 
WiLLKY, Nettie Morton . . . 

WiLLEY, Raymond 

Willis, Raymond Smith, *. B. E. 

Wilson, Alda, B.C.E 

Wilson, Alice Virginia . . . 

Wilson, Elmina, C. E 

Wing, Charles Frederic . . . 
Wing, David Laforest, A. K. E. 
Wing, Ida Ceola Stratton . . 
Winslow, Charles-Edward Amory 
WiNSLow, George Carlos, Jr. . 
Wise, Howard Parker .... 
Witherby, Edwin C, S.B., A. A. * 

WiTHERELL, FREDERICK WhITEFIELD 

Witherell, Percy Warren . . 
Wood, Florence Anna .... 
Wood, Willard Lyman, Jr. . . 
Wood, William Remington . . 
Wood, Winthrop Barrett . . 
Woodman, Alpheus Grant . . 
Woodman, George Madock . . 
Woodward, Allan Harvey . . 
Woodworth, Edward Harold 
WooDYATT, Ernest, 2. X. . . . 
Woollett, John Woodward . . 
Worden, Edwin Sheldon . . . 
Wright, George Henry . . . 

Wyzanski, Isaac 

Zibgler, Percy Rolfe .... 
zimmermann, walter, g. £. x. 
Zirngiebel, Frances 



VI. 
S. 
V. 
S. 
S. 
V. 

s. 

VI. 
IX. 

s. 

VII. 
VI. 

I. 
s. 
II. 

VI. 
VIII. 

VI. 
XIII. 

I. 

V. 

I. 
III. 

V. 
IV. 

I. 
II. 

IX. 

s. 

II. 

II. 

s. 



*98 619 B. St.. S. E. Wa8hington,D.C. 

I Bower Park, Roxbury, Mass. 
'00 Newtonville, Mass. 

210 Davis St., Evanston, 111. 

Harper, Iowa. 
*oo Lenoir, N. C. 

Harper, Iowa. 
'98 37 So. 6th St., New Bedford, Mass. 
*98 76 Ohio St., Bangor, Me. 

49 Boylston St., Jamaica Plain. 
'98 Hotel Oxford, Boston, Mass. 
*99 12 Yarmouth St., Boston, Mass. 
'00 139 Webster St., Maiden, Mass. 

5 Jackson St., Worcester, Mass. 
*co II Herrick St., Winchester, Mass. 
'99 5 Devon St., Roxbury, Mass. 
*97 9 Bainbridge St., Roxbury, Mass. 
*99 Upton, Mass. 

*97 136 Broadway, Providence, R. I. 
'98 Concord, Mass. 
'97 Essex, Mass. 
'97 Essex, Mass. 
'00 Birmingham, Ala. 
'97 Newtonville, Mass. 
*97 Evanston, 111. 
*99 Valmont, Col. 
*oo Newton, Mass. 
'98 104 Dartmouth St., Boston, Mass. 

9 Sheafe St., Boston. 
'00 I Ellis St., Roxbury, Mass. 
'98 683 Sedgwick St., Chicago, 111. 

61 Bower St., Roxbury, Mass. 



V» 



In l7)einoriaiti. 

PARKER REED McLAUTHLIN, '99. 
Died April 23, 1896. 

VILLIAM MONTAGUE HALL, ^98. 
Died June 1% 1896. 

CHARLES MAYO SVAN, ^. 
Died July 31, 1896. 

JOSEPH GUSHING, '97. 
Died September 18, 1896. 

SAMUEL HINKLEY ALLYNE, ^98. 
Died December 13, 1896. 



LOUiaL 5CH0OL 




PtolOD 



Adams, Lucv Marv Hvde Park. Mass. 

Algbr, John HBKHeRT Reading, Mass. 

Allhn, WiNTHHOP Blakeslev Ncwton, Mass. 

Barnard. Wm.tkr Mason Granville, N. Y. 

Barrett. Jessie Gertrude Maiden, Msss. 

Baxter. Clara V Dorchester, Mass. 

Bbbub. Adelaide Sophia Boston, Mast. 

Bliss. Nbllib May Quincy. M««8. 

BucKNAM. Grace Winslow Roxbury, Man. 

Chamberlain, I[arriette Locise . , Boston, Mass. 

Danforth, Homer Wallace Woburn, Mass. 

Davis, Grace Hammond Littleton, N. H. 

Daw, Minnie Ella ... Franklin, Ma«. 

DwvER, Elizabeth Lobetta Cambridgeporl, Mass. 

Falvev, Kartarine Roxbury, Mass 

Fiske, Edith Portbb Cambridgeporl, Mast. 

Ford, Harriet J Duxbury, Mass. 

Gillette, Mary LoilsE Newton Highland., Mass. 

Goodrich, Grace Rosetta Dorchester. Mass. 

Gray. Reuben Forest South Manchester, Conn. 

GuRLL, Alice F Boston, Mass. 

Harvey, Elvira Toi'PAN Newton Highlands, Mass. 

Hill. Henry Brooks STEnlEN Roxbury, Mass. 

Hilton, Resa Evelyn Hyde Park, Mass. 

Mines. Edward Waldron ' Panversport, Mass. 

HosMER, George Hammond Everett. Mass. 

Humphrey. Jane Marion K Boston, Mass. 

Jordan, Carlotta May Boston, Mass. 

Kidger. Lottie Henson Everett, Mass. 

Lasker. Florencb Ernestine Boston, Mass. 

McGrath, Benedict Vincent Mattapan, Mais. 

Orcutt, Leon F Hyde Park, Ma««. 

304 



Palmer, Ernest Packard ,.,.,,. South Boiton, Mats. 

Parker. Jamss BuBPSE Newtonville, Mass. 

Pike, Helen Packard Worcester, Mass. 

Pooh, Frederick Walton Derrj, N. H. 

Richardson, Helen Louise Roxbury, Mass. 

Sargent, Ethel Marion Ro^ibur^, Mass. 

Skackpord. Charles Lee East Weymouth, Mass. 

Stanton, Walter F. Boston, Mass. 

SvMoNDs, Eliza T Hyde Park, Mass. 

Taogard, Hattie Sophia Nashua, N. H. 

Thurssson, Maude May South Boston, Mass. 

TiLESTON, Millie Hovghtun Dorchester. Mass. 

Tripp, Herbert Lvhan Middlehoro, Mass. 

Waterman, James Cupeland Hanover, Mass. 

Wheeler, Bessie Baldwin Dorchester, Mass. 

Wood, Bkulah Locke ......... Roslindale, Mass. 

Wright, Mvra Boston, Mass. 





FELLOW& 
Savagf Fellowihip. 
Wrndbll. George Vincent, S.B.. MassHchusetts Institute of Technology. 

Swett Fdlowihip, 
Berry, Charles William, S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technoiogj>. 



CANDIDATES FOR ADVANCED DEGREES. 

BlXBY. Gborge Linden, S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
CuMMiNQs. [iBNRy, Jh., SB., MasBBchusclts Institute of Technology. 
DooD, Margaret Bliot, S.B., Massachusetts Inttitute of Technology. 
Henry, Ralph Coolidce, S.B,, Massachuseils Institute of Technologj'. 
Kbitk, Simeon Curtis, Jr.. S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 
Smith, Hbrbbrt Edwards, S.B., MaBBachusetti InBtitute of Technologj. 
Smysbr, Albert Ernest, S.B.. Massachusetts Institute of Technotog/. 
Shvser. James Swktt, S.B.. MasBachuBetiB InBtituie of Technology. 
Whitten, William Henry, Jr., S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 



OTHER GRADUATE STUDENTS. 

Anderson, Robert, Ph.B., Yale University. 

Andrews, George Frederick, A.M.. Brown University. 

Benson. Howard Jonathan, Ph.B., Colorado College, 

Blossom, David Henry. A.B., Middlebury College. 

Brown, Dickson QtiEHN, A.B.. Princeton University. 

Brown, Warren Day, A.B., Amherst College. 

Burr, Helen Louise. B.A., WellcBley College. 

Chapman. James Finlby. B.S.. Carleton College. 

Chase, Aurin Moody, B.S., Amherst College. 

Chase, Wendell Wyse. B.C.E., Main Slate College. 

Clark, Charles Bevan, A.B., Johns Hopkins University. 

Curtis, Harry Appleton, A.B.. Harvard University. 

Cutler, Jane Ruth, A.B., Smith College. 

Daniels, Nathan Hagar, Jr., S.B.. Massachusettt Institute of Technology'. 

30« 



Darlington, William, M.E., Cornell University. 

Dater, Philip Herrick, B.A., Williams College. 

Deavitt, Henry McIntyre, B.S., University of Vermont. 

Dodge, Edwin Shbrrill, A.B., Harvard University. 

Doty, George Francis, B.A., Throop Institute. 

Elson, Arthur, A.B., Harvard University. 

Fbnner, David Colton, Ph.B., Yale University. 

Ferguson, Finlay Forbes, A.B., B.S., Hampden-Sidney College. 

Field, Leonard Hamilton, A.B., Amherst College. 

Fifield, Ethel Frances, A.B., Smith College. 

FiTz Gerald, John Watson, S.B., University of Michigan. 

Frothingham, Brooks, A.B., Harvard University. 

Gilmore, Jonathan Monroe, 6.S., University of California. 

Godfrey, William Hollis, Ph.B., Tufts College. 

Greenman, Bessie, B.A., Wellesley College. 

Guy, James Rinoold, B.S., Virginia Polytechnic Institute. 

Hayward, Nathan, A.B., Harvard University. 

Heghinian, Garabed George, A.B., Central Turkey College. 

Hewitt, Edwin Hawley, A.B., University of Minnesota. 

Hoefler, Philo Remington, B.S., Norwich University. 

Horsey, Outerbridge, Jr., A.B., Georgetown University. 

Howard, Arthur Fiske, B.S., Amherst College. 

Huntington, George Danforth, A.B., University of Rochester. 

HuRD, Benjamin, S.B., Massachusetts Institute of Technology. 

JENKINS, Lawrence Waters, A.B., Harvard University. 
OHNSON, Arthur Albert, A.B., Indianapolis University. 
Lacy, Robert, A.B., Johns Hopkins University. 
Lansingh, Van Rensselaer, B.S., University of Chicago. 
Lawrence, Amos Amory, A.B., Harvard University. 
Lombard, Percival Hall, A.B., Harvard University. 
Long, Margaret, A.B., Smith College. 
Mabie, Harry Saxton, B.P., Brown University. 
McIver, Jean Bond, B.S., Wellesley College. 
McKell, William, Ph.B., Yale University (S. S. S.) 
Merrick, Charles Irving, A.B., Harvard University. 
Nebbl, Hbrreros Alejandro. B.S., University of Santiago. 
Neidich. Samuel Abrahims, Ph B., Dickinson College. 
Nelson, Alexander Harvard, A.B., Princeton University. 
O'Leary, William Henry Joseph, A.M., Georgetown University. 
Oliver, Marshal Francis, A.B., St. John's College. 
Potts, Louis Joseph, A.B., Boston College. 
Putnam, William Edward, Jr., A.B., Harvard University. 
Real y Gaillard, Juan, A.B., Colegio de Carreras. 
Richardson, Philip, A.B., Harvard University. 
Sargent, Homer Earle, Jr., Ph.B., Yale University (S. S. S.) 
Scudder. Hayward, B.A., Trinity College. 
Smith, George Lawrence, A.B., Harvard University. 
Smith, Harrison Willard, A.B., Harvard University. 
Stockton, Philip, A.B., Harvard University. 
Stouder, John Burton, B.E.. Drake University. 
Tinkham, Edgar Luther, B.P., Brown University. 
Tower, Samuel Francis, A.B., Dartmouth College. 
Weaver, Erasmus Morgan, Graduate U. S. Artillery School. 
Wessel, John Frederick, A.B.. Georgetown University. 
Wilson, Alda, B.C E., Iowa State College. 
Wilson, Elmina, C.E., Iowa State College. 
Witherby, Edwin Chaplin, S.B., Amherst College. 



307 



i 




youNG Women ax the Institute. 



Allen, Lucy Mabel Chemistry, 

Ballantyne, Bertha Lbnnie, Chemistry^Drawing^English^Language^Matkematics, 

Bartlett, Jane Howard, 'oo Regular. 

BoLAND, Mary A Biology, Language, 

Buck, Hattie Josephine Biology, Geology, Mathematics, 

Burr; Alice Morville Biology. 

Burr, Helen Louise Biology, 

Chamberlain, Grace English. 

Chandler, Edna Matilda, V., '99 . Regular, 

Chapman, Mary Bugbee English. 

Church, Lenoir Campbell, 'go Regular,- 

Clapp, Mabel Delano Biology, 

Cornell, Leonora C. Chemistry, 

Crane, Eva Hayes, IV., '98 . ... ... 'Regular, 

Cutler, Jane Ruth, A.B Chemistry, 

Day, Mary Harriet Biology, 

Dexter, Katherine Moore Biology ^ Chemistry, 

DoDD, Margaret Eliot, S.B Biology, 

DoLBEAR, Katherine Ella Geology, 

DoziER, Henrietta Cuttins, IV., '99 Regular. 

Duff, Ellen Loretto Biology, 

DuRGiN, Clara Isabel, *oo Regular. 

FiFiELD, Ethel Frances, A.B. Architecture, Drawing. 

Forrest, Mabel Flora, VII., '98 Regular. 

Garrett, Christina Hallowell, IV., '99 Regular, 

Green.man, Bessie, B.A Mathematics, Physics, 

Ham, Clara Eleanor, VII., '99 Regular. 

Harriman, Susan Sigourney Biology. 

Hicks, Anna Cordelia .... Architecture, Drawing, Mathematics, 

Hill, Grace Mary Mathematics. 

Hopwood, Cora Stella, *oo . . Regular, 

Hough, Elizabeth E. Biology, 

Hyde, Anna Farwell Biology, 

Johnson, Josephine Forbush Biology. 

Kennedy, Mildred Biology. 

Kingsbury, Ivy Anna Drawing, 

Laing, Minerva Abigale Biology, Chemistry, Language, 

Lander, Ruth Ella Biology, 

Langford, Grace, VIII., '98 Regular, 

Leadbetter, Florence Eugenie Chemistry, 

309 



Long, Margaret, A.B Biology^ Physics. 

Manning, Alice Lee Chemistry, 

McIvER, Jean Bond Biology. 

Mills, Helen Curtis Biology. 

NoRRis, Grace Adelaide .......... Chemistry. 

NoYES, Harriet Niles Biology^ Chemistry^ Drawing, 

0*Connell, Catherine Biology. 

Phcenix, Amy Elizabeth Biology* 

Potter, Sarah Emeline Biology. 

Ryan, Ida Annah ..... Architecture^ Drawings Mathematics. 

Schlesinger, Helen Biology^ Chemistry. 

Stark, Helen Gertrude Biology. 

Strong, Mary Baker Biology. 

Sturtevant, Mary Biology. 

SwiNsoN, JoHANNAH CHARLOTTE, 'oo Regular, 

Thomson, Mary Jane, V., '97 Regular, 

TiLTON, Mary Azuba Biology. 

Tucker-Cornell Idair Biology. 

Usher, Susannah ' 2^?'"^' Drawmg, English Geology, 

t History.^ Language^ Pohttcal ocience. 

Wescott, Jennie Smith Biology. 

Whiting, Eleanor Felton Biology^ Chemistry. 

VViGNALL, Lily Biology. 

WiLLEY, Nettie Morton Chemistry^ Physics. 

Wilson, Alda, B C.E. . . Architecture^ Drawings Language. 

Wilson, Alice Virginia, *oo Regular. 

Wilson, Elmina, C.E. . . . Architecture, Drawings Geology^ Language. 

Wing, Ida Ceola Stratton Chemistry. 

Wood, Florence Anna, VHI., '97 Regular. 

Zirngiebel, Frances Biology, 



310 



Index. 



PAGE. 

A Conversation 245 

Abbreviations 278 

Administrative Officers 9 

Advertisements 317 

Alumni Associations 143 

Alumni, Salaries of 269 

Amateur Records, World's 196 

Andover Club 105 

Architectural Society 122 

Architectural Summer School 216 

Arts, Society of 147 

Assistants 28 

Athletic Association, New England Intercollegiate .... 182 

Athletic Club, Technology 177 

Athletics 175 

Athletics, Editorial on General 176 

Banjo Club 139 

Baseball, Ninety-eight vs. Ninety-nine 205 

Biological Journal Club 128 

*• Birdie Reading Book," The 237 

" Button, Button, Who's got a Button.^" 226 

Calendar 6 

Cane Rush 211 

Chess Club, The 119 

Chicago Club 115 

Cincinnati Club 114 

Civil Engineering Society 124 

Class Championship, 1895-96 190 

Class Colors and Yells 76 

Class Day 156 

Classes, The 55 

Class Secretaries, Graduate 145 

Cleofan, The 106 

College Statistics 274 

Contents 4 

Co-Operative Society 153 

Copyright 2 

Corporation, Members of the 8 

Corps of Cadets, The 154 

Courses, The 276 

Cross-Country Run 188 

Dedication 3 

Delta Sigma loi 

Design, Lowell School of 304 

Distribution of Students 267 



3" 



I'AGB 

Deutsche Verein, Der no 

Dinner, Freshman 164 

Dinner, Junior 166 

Dinner, Senior 167 

Dinner, Sophomore 165 

Editorial on General Athletics 176 

Electoral Committee, TECHNiquE i68 

Electrical Engineering Society . . 127 

English High School Club 117 

English Plays 161 

Faculty, The 32 

Finis 316 

FoGERTY*s Page 246 

Football Association 197 

Fraternities 77 

Fraternity of Chi Phi 85 

Fraternity of Delta Kappa Epsilon 87 

Fraternity of Delta Psi 83 

Fraternity of Delta Tau Delta 95 

Fraternity of Delta Upsilon 91 

Fraternity of Phi Beta Epsilon 89 

Fraternity of Sigma Alpha Epsilon 93 

Fraternity of Sigma Chi 79 

Fraternity of Theta Xi 81 

Fraternities Represented, Other 97 

Fraternity Summary 98 

Frenxh Plays 162 

Freshman Class History 57 

Games of M. I. T. A. C, Handicap 187 

Games of M. I. T. A. C, Scratch 192 

Geological Society 129 

Glee Club 135 

Graduates by Courses, Summary of 268 

Graduate Students 306 

Graduating Exercises 157 

Greeting 5 

Grinds 223 

Groups : — 

Banjo Club 138 

Glee Club 134 

Institute Committee 148 

Junior Class .......... inserted at 65 

Mandolin Club 136 

Nineteen Hundred Football Team 202 

Ninety-eight Football Team 204 

Ninety-eight Track Team 184 

Ninety-nine Baseball Team 206 

Ninety-nine Football Team 200 

TECHNiqi^E . inserted at 172 

Technology Football Team iq8 

Technology Relay Team 180 

Technology Track Team 178 

"The Tech" Board 170 

Gun Club, The 118 

Gymnastics, Instruction in 30 



313 



PAGB. 

Hall, Life of William Montague 213 

Hammer and Tongs 100 

Handicap Games, M. I. T. A. C 187 

Hare and Hound Club 210 

Hours of Preparation 272 

Index 312 

Individual Excellence Cup 191 

In Memoriam 303 

Institute Committee 149 

Instructing Staff 1896-97 266 

Instructors ... 24 

Junior Class History 67 

Junior Class, Picture of inserted at 65 

Junior Promenade 155 

KjS 102 

Key to Picture of Junior Class 65 

L'Avenir 109 

Local Societies 99 

Lolwel School of Design . . 304 

Mandamin Club 103 

Mandolin Club 137 

Mechanic Arts, Instructors and Assistants in 30 

Meeting, Indoor Winter 189 

Meeting, Annual Spring 186 

Members of the Corporation ......... 8 

Miners' Union ............. 131 

Miscellaneous 141 

Musical Organizations 133 

Banjo Club 139 

Glee Club 135 

Mandolin Club 137 

Technology Glee, Banjo, and Mandolin Clubs ...... 140 

Naval Architectural Society 130 

New England Intercollegiate Athletic Association .... 187 

N. E. I. A. A. Annual Meeting 182 

N. E. I. A. A. Records 195 

Nineteen Hundred Football Team 203 

Ninety-eight Baseball Tram 205 

Ninety-eight Track Team 185 

Ninety-nine Baseball Team 207 

Ninety-nine Football Team 201 

Officers, Administrative 9 

Officers of Instruction ........... 10 

Other Fraternities Represented 97 

Parade of Republican Club 159 

Photogravure of Francis A. Walker inserted at i 

Picture of Junior Class 65 

Portfolio, Senior 174 

Professional Societies 121 

Professors 11 

Publications, Technology 169 

Quarterly, Technology 173 

Quotations 260 

Records 193 

Register of Students 279 

Republican Club 158 

3H 



FAGB. 

Salaries op Alumni 269 

Senior Class History 71 

Senior Portfolio 174 

Sherwood Club 104 

Society of Arts 147 

Sophomore Class History 61 

Southern Club 113 

Statistics 266 

Students, Register of 279 

Summary, Fraternity 98 

Summary of Points for Class Championship 190 

Summary of Points for Individual Excellence Cup .... 191 

Summary of Points N. E. I. A. A. Meeting 183 

Summer School, Architectural 216 

Teachers and Lectures for 1896-97 31 

Technique Board of Editors 172 

TECHNiquE Electoral Committee 168 

Technique Tonsorial Parlors 232 

Technology Alumni Associations 143 

Technology Athletic Club 177 

Technology Club 219 

Technology Football Team 199 

Technology Glee, Banjo, and Mandolin Clubs . ... 140 

Technology Publications 169 

Technology Records 193 

Technology Relay Team 181 

Technology Track Team 179 

Technology Wheelmen 120 

Tennis Association ... - 208 

Testimonials 239 

The Tech Board of Editors 171 

Title Page inserted at i 

Track Team, Ninety-eight 185 

Track Team, Technology 179 

Verse 251 

Walker Club 112 

Walker, Life of Francis A 33 

Walker, Photogravure of Francis A. . ... . . inserted at i 

Washington Club 116 

Women at Technology 308 

Wrech, The 228 

Yacht Club, Technology 108 

Young Men*s Christian Association 151 



315 










J 



(^LassiFiED List of Advertisers. 



Aluminum : — 

Pittsburg Reduction Co. 

Artists' Materials : — 

Frost & Adams Co. 
Wadsworth, Howland & Co. 
A. D. Maclachlan . 

Balanced Steam Traps : — 
Curtis .... 

Barber : — 

Jasper Ross 

Batteries : — 

Leclanch<5 Battery Co. . 







Page. 


Books : — 


62 


Ira Abbott 

Damrell & Upham 

G. & C. Merriam Co. . 


2^ 
22 


Bridge Builders: — 


89 


R. F. Hawkins 




Brokers : — 


73 


Allen Arnold . 
F. W. Perrv . 
U. S. Cheque Bank, Ltd 



JI 



84 



Belting : — 




Jewell Belting Co. 


52 


Uhner Belting Co. 


^3 


Bicycles : — 




Bigelow & Dowse Co. . 


88 


Richmond Bicycle Co. . 


87 


Syracuse Cycle Co. 


89 


Charles H. Sieg & Co. . 


90 


Worcester Cycle Co. 


92 


Boilers:— 




Abcndroth & Root Manfg. Co. 


64 


»»Cahall" Sales Dept. . 


64 


Edward Kendall & Sons 


42 


Roberts Iron Works Co. 


41 


Scannell & Wholev 


41 


R. F. Hawkins Iron Works . 


43 



Bookbinders : — 

Alexander Moore 



18 



Bronze : — 

Paul S. Reeves & Son 

Cameras : — 

E. & H. T. Anthony & Co. . 
A.J. Lloyd & Co. . 

Carbon Bisulphide : — 

Ed. R. Tavlor ... 

Chemicals : — 

Baker & Adamson . 

Chase & Bissell 

Cochrane Chemical Co. 

Chas. Cooper & Co. 

Lister Agricultural Chemical Co 

Merck & Co 

Roessler & Ilasslacher Chemical 

^i/O* • • • • • 

Ed. R. Taylor 

Chemical Apparatus: — 

Eimer & Amend 
Franklin Educational Co. 
E. S. Ritchie & Son 



Page. 

18 
iS 
18 



29 



43 
29 
92 



63 



34 
34 



78 



79 
79 
79 
78 
79 
78 



76 

78 



73 

75 



Chucks : — 

Skinner Chuck Co. 
American Tool and Machine Co. . 
James Hunter Machine Co. . 
D. E. Whiton Machine Co. . 

Cordage : — 

Samson Cordage Co. 

Clothing : — 

Brooks Bros. ..... 

Geo. II. Lane .... 

Core Ovens : — 

Millet Core Oven Co. 

Cotton Machinery :— 

Anierican Drosophore Co. 

Draper Co 

Lowell Machine Shops . 

Drawing Instruments : — 

Theo. Alteneder & Sons 

Frost & Adams Co. 

A. D. Maclachlan 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co. (Inc). 

Drills :— 

Rand Drill Co. ... 

Dyes : — 

Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld Co. 
O. S. Janney & Co. 
A. Klipstein & Co. 
Wm. Pichardt & Kuttroff 

Educational Institutions : — 

Boston Commercial College 
Chauncey Hall School . 
Mass. Institute of Technology 
Trinity Court School 

Electrical Supplies : — 
Geo. C. Ewing 
Warren P. Freeman Co. 
Interior Conduit & Insulation Co 
Okonite .... 

Thompson & Bushnell 
W. W. Tupper& Co. . 
Standard Underground Cable Co 
Weston Electrical Instrument Co. 



Paob. 

37 

43 
40 

37 
38 



9 

12 



35 



97 

51 
51 



23 
23 

89 
■> ■» 



Page. 
Engravers : — 

Boston Engraving Co. ... 95 

L. Dreka 15 

Engines : — 

Ball & Wood Co. ... 67 

Buckeye Engine Co. . 68 

J. H. Houghton .... 67 

Lidgerwood Manfg. Co. 68 

Rollins Engine Co. ... 66 

Files : — 

Nickolson File Co. • • • 39 

Fire Arms : — 

Marlin Arms Co. *. . . 86 

Furnishings : — 

L. E. Fletcher & Co. . . 12 

Reversible Collar Co. ... 68 

Graphite : — 

Detroit Graphite Manfg. Co. . 37 

Joseph Dixon Crucible Co. . . 37 

Hats : — 

Collins & Fairbanks 11 

Heating and Ventilating Apparatus: — 



• 


58 


American Radiator Co. 


82 






A. B. Franklin . . . . 


81 






B. F. Perkins & Son 


41 


■ 


76 


B. F. Sturtevant Co. 


56 


• 


77 


Curtis Grease Separators 


73 


• 


77 


Millet Core Oven Co. . 


35 


• 


77 


Richmond Stove Co. 
Hotels : — 


35 


• 


M 


Brunswick .... 


26 


• 


13 


The Plaza .... 


37 


• 


17 


The St. Denis 


28 


• 


13 


Inspirators and Jet Apparatus: — 








Hancock Inspirator Co. 


II 




«3 


Insurance :— 






71 


Hartford Steam Boiler Insuranc< 


> 




83 
84 

7^ 


and Inspection Co. 


29 




Jewelers : — 






35 


A. S. Adams .... 


16 


, 


84 


Shreve, Crump & Low . 


16 




84 


Henry Guild & Son 


16 



Page. 



Iron and Steel : — 




Benj. Atha & Illingsworth Co. 


6i 


Crescent Steel Co. 


62 


Stanley G. Flagg & Co. 


61 


Lamps : — 




Rochester Lamp Co. 


15 


Lathes : — 




Jones & Lamson Co. 


44 


Niles Tool Works Co. . 


44 


H. N. Bates Machine Co. 


49 


Gould & Eberhardt 


65 


Pratt & Whitney Co. . 


48 


Prentice Bros. 


43 


Waterbury Farrel Foundry & Ma 




chine Co. 


43 


LuBRiCATiNCi Oil : — 




Chas. H. Besly & Co. . 


yi 


Leonard cV: Ellis 


52 



Lubricators : — 

Detroit Lubricator Co. . 

Machine Shop EqiiPMENT : — 

American Tool & Machine Co. 

H. N. Bates Machine Co. 

Gould & Eberhardt 

R. F. Hawkins 

J. H. Houghton 

James Hunter Machine Co. 

Jeflfery Manfg. Co. . 

Niles Tool Works Co. . 

Pratt & Whitney Co. 

Prentice Bros. 

Rhode Island Tool Co. . 

Scannell & W holey 

I). E. Whiton Machine Co. 

Tippett & Wood 

Waterbury Farrel Foundry 

Machine Co. . 
Weimer Machine Co. 
R. D. Wood & Co. 

Mackintoshes : — 

Cleve & Krim 

Metals : — 

Chas. H. Besly & Co. . 
Pittsburg Reduction Co. 
Rome Brass and Copper Co. 
Paul S. Reeves & Sons . 



and 



73 



43 

49 

65 

43 
67 

40 
38 
44 
48 
43 
49 
41 
37 
42 

43 
60 

50 

12 



91 
62 

63 
63 



Mining Machinery: — 

Eraser & Chalmers 

Rand Drill Co 

Weimer Machine Co. 

Oil Stones : — 

Pike Manfg. Co. .... 

Opticians : — 

A. J. Lloyd & Co. 

Ornamental Iron : — 

Winslow Bros. Co. 

Pails : — 

Richmond Cedar Co. 

Patents : — 

Howson & Howson 

Patent Medicines : — 

Pond's Extract Co. 

Piso Co. ..... 

Pencils : — 

Joseph Dixon Crucible Co. . 

Photographers : — 

Chas. W. Hearn ... 
Notman Photographic Co. 
Patridge 

Pipe : — 

Chas. Millar & Son 

Warren Foundry and Machine Co. 

Platinum : — 

Baker & Co. . . . . . 

J. Bishop <!v: Co. . . . . 

Eimer & Amend . . . . 

Franklin Educational Co 

Pressure Regulators: — 

Curtis Pressure Regulators . 

Printers : — 

Frank Wood . . . . . 

Pu.MPiNG Machinery: — 

Battle Creek Steam Pump Co. 
Deane Steam Pump Co. 
Guild & Garrison . . . . 
Pulsometer Steam Pump Co. 



Page. 
60 

ss 
60 



36 

34 

81 

36 

36 

96 
13 

37 



<9 
20 

30 



63 
48 



75 
75 
73 

75 



73 



94 



35 
54 
42 
56 



b 



Radiators : — 

American Radiator Co. 

Railroad Ec^uipment : — 

Ramapo Iron Works Co. 

Restaurants : — 

A.Alger 

Oak Grove Creamery Co. 

Return Steam Traps: — 

Curtis 

Road Rollers : — 

The O. S. Kelly Co. . . . 

Roofing : — 

Warren Chemical Mfg. Co. . 

Rubber Goods : — 

Cleve & Krim . . . . 

Sanitary Supplies: — 

Flush Tank Co 

Saws : — 

Simonds Mfg. Co. 

Snow Guards : — 

Folsom Snow Guard Co. 

Springs : — 

Chas. Scott Spring Co. 

Stains : — 

Samuel Cabot 

Stationers : — 

F. W. Barry, Beale & Co. 

Dreka 

A. D. Maclachlan . 

Steam Gauges and Valves : — 

American Balance Slide Valve Co 
American Steam Gauge Co. . 
Crosby Steam Gage and Valve Co 
D'Este & Seelcy Co. 
Detroit Lubricator Co. . 
Hancock Inspirator Co. 
Locke Regulator Co. 
Lunkenheimer & Co. 



Pagb. 

82 

40 

26 
26 

73 
38 
48 
12 

83 

47 
82 

36 

82 



15 
89 



72 
70 
69 

73 

73 
II 

73 



Steam Pressure and Damper Regu 
lators : — 

Curtis 



T_ 



Surveying Instruments : — 

Fauth & Co. . 
A. Lietz Co. . 

Tailors : — 

Brooks Bros. . 
Geo. H. Lane 

Temperature Regulators : — 

Curtis .... 
Tools : — 

Athol Machine Co. 
Chas. H. Besly & Co. . 
Lewis Tool Co. 
L. S. Starrett Co. . 
Chas. H. Strelinger & Co. 
A. J. Wilkinson & Co. . 

Transportation Companies : — 

Boston & Albany R. R. 
Norfolk & Western R. R. . 
Old Dominion Steamship Co. 
Southern Pacific R. R. . 

Trolleys : — 

Coburn Trolley Track Manfg. Co. 

Typewriters and Stenographers: — 
Daugherty Typewriter Co. . 
Densmore Typewriter Co. 
Merriam & Meader 
W. H. Moriarty . . . . 

Water Pressure Regulators : — 

Curtis 

Water Wheels: — 

Humphrey Machine Co. 
James Leffel & Co. 
Pelton Water Wheel Co. 
Tuerk Hydraulic Power Co. . 

Well Boring : — 

Williams Bros. . . . . 

Wire : — 

Chas. H. Besly & Co. . 
InteriorConduitand Insulation Co. 

Okonite 

Standard Underground Cable Co. 

Wood- Working Machinery: — 

J. A. Fay & Egan Co. . 
S. A. Woods Machine Co. 



Page. 

74 
74 

9 
12 

73 

47 
9» 
38 
47 
47 
45 

3^ 
30 

30 
ZZ 

81 

24 

25 
18 

14 

73 

60 

59 
59 
59 

40 



9t 

83 
84 
84 



53 
53 



^LPHaBETicaL List of Advertisers. 



Co 



o 



Abbott, Ira .... 

Abendroth & Root Manfg. Co 

Adams, A. S. . 

Algar, a. .... 

Alteneder, Theo., cV Sons . 

American Balance Slide Valve 

American Drosophore Co. 

American Radiator Co. 

American Stea.m Gauge Co. 

American Tool and Machine 

Anthony, E. and H. T., & Co. 

Arnold, Allen 

Atha, Benj., & Illingsworth C 

Athol Machine Co. 

Baker & Adamson Chemical Co 

Baker & Co 

Ball and Wood Co., The . 
Barnes & Dunklee 
Barry, F. W., Beale & Co. . 
Bates, H. N., Machine Co. . 
Battle Creek Steam Pump Co. 
Besly, Chas. H. & Co. . 
BiGELOW & Dowse Co. 
Bishop, J., & Co. . 
Boston & Albany R. R. 
Boston Commercial College 
Boston Engraving Co. 
Brooks Bros. 
Brunswick Hotel 
Buckeye Engine Co. 
Cabot, Samuel 
•' Cahall" Sales Dept. 



Co 



Page. 

i8 

64 
16 

26 

23 

72 

97 
82 

70 

43 

34 

29 
61 

47 

79 

75 
67 

26 

15 

49 

35 

91 
88 

75 

31 

14 

95 

9 
26 

68 

82 

64 



Chauncey Mall School 

Chase & Bissell . 

Cleve & Krim 

Coburn Trolley Track Manfg. 

Cochrane Chemical Co. 

Collins & Fairbanks . 

Cooper, Chas. & Co. 

Crescent Steel Co. 

Crosby Steam Gage and Valve 

Damrell & Upham 

Daugherty Typewriter Co. 

Deane Steam Pump Co. 

Densmore Typewriter Co. 

D'Este & Seeley Co. 

Detroit Graphite Manfg. Co. 

Detroit Lubricator Co. 

Dixon, Jos., Crucible Co. . 

Draper Co 

Dreka, L. .... 
EiMER & Amend 
Ewing, Geo. C. . . . 
Farbenfabriken of Elberfeld 

Fauth & Co 

Fay, J. A., & Egan Co. 
Felt & Tarrant Mfg. Co. 
Flagg, Stanley G., & Co. . 
Fletcher, L. E. Co. 
Flush Tank Co. . 
FoLsoM Snow Guard Co. 
Forbes Lithograph Mfg. Co. 
Franklin, A. B. . 
Franklin Educational Co. 



Co. 



Co. 



Co. 



Paob. 

13 

79 
12 

81 

79 
II 

78 

62 

69 
18 

24 

54 

25 

73 

37 

73 

37 

5« 

15 

73 

83 
76 

74 
53 
96 
61 
12 

83 
82 

85 
81 

75 



Co 



Fraser & Chalmers 

Freeman, Warren P., & Co. 

Frost & Adams Co. 

Gould & Eberhardt . 

Guild & Garrison 

Guild, Henry, & Son 

Hancock Inspirator Co. 

Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection 

AND Insurance Co. 
Hawkins, R. F. 
Hearn, Chas. W. . 
Hotel Plaza . 
Houghton, J. H. 
HowsoN & HOWSON 
Humphrey Machine Co. 
Hunter, James, Machine Co. 
Interior Conduit & Insulation 
Janney, O. S., & Co. 
Jeffery Manfg. Co. 
Jessop, Wm., & Sons, Ltd. 
Jewell Belting Co. 
Jones, B. M., & Co. 
Jones & Lamson Manfg. Co. 
Kelly, The O. S., Co. 
Kendall, Ed., & Sons . 
Klipstein, a., & Co 
Lane, G. H. . 
Leclanche Battery Co. 
Lepfel, James, & Co. . 
Leonard & Ellis . 
Lewis Tool Co. 
Lidgerwood Manfg. Co. 
LlETZ, A., Co. 
Lister Agricultural Chemical 

Manfg. Co. 
Lloyd, A. J. . 
Locke Regulator Co. 
Lowell Machine Shop 
Lunkenheimer & Co. 
Maclachlan, a. D. 
Marlin Arms Co. . 



Page. 
60 

71 
23 

65 
42 
16 
II 

29 

43 
19 
27 
67 

36 
60 
40 

83 
77 
38 
62 

52 
61 

44 
38 
42 

77 
12 

84 
59 
52 
38 
68 

74 

78 
34 
73 
51 
71 
S9 
86 



Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology 
Merriam, G. & C. Co. 
Merriam & Meader 
Merck & Co. . 
Millar, Chas., & Son 
Millet Core Oven Co 
Moore, Alexander 

MORIARTY, Wm. H. 

NiCKOLsoN File Co. 
NiLES Tool Works Co 
Norfolk & Western R. R. Co. 
NoTMAN Photograph Co. 
Oak Grove Creamery Co. 
Okonite Manfg. Co. . 
Old Dominion Steamship Co. 
Partridge, W. H. . 
Partridge & Macullar 
Pelton Water Wheel Co. 
Perkins, B. F., & Son . 
Perry, F. W. . 
PicHARDT, Wm., & Kuttroff 

Piso Co 

Pike Manfg. Co. . 
Pittsburg Reduction Co. 
Pond's Extract Co. 
Pratt & Whitney Co. 
Prentice Bros. 

PULSOMETER StEAM PuMP CO. 

Ramapo Iron Works Co. 
Rand Drill Co. 
Reeves, Paul S., & Son 
Rhode Island Tool Co. 
Reversible Collar Co. 
Rhode Island Tool Co. 
Richmond Bicycle Co. 
Richmond Cedar Works 
Richmond Stove Co. . 
Ritchie, E. S., & Son . 
Roberts Iron Works Co. 
Rochester Lamp Co. . 



Page. 

17 
21 

18 

79 

63 

35 
18 

39 
44 
30 
20 
26 

84 

30 
20 

85 
59 
4> 
29 
77 
»3 
36 
62 

96 
48 
43 
56 
40 

58 
63 

49 
68 

49 
87 
36 

35 
86 

41 

15 



RoEssLER & Hasslachrr Chemical 

Co 

Rollins Engine Co. 
Rome Brass & Copper Co. 
Ross, Jasper . 
Saegmuller, Geo. N. 
Samson Cordacje Works 

SCANNELL & WhoLRV 

Scott, Chas., Spring Co. 
Shreve, Crl'mp & Low Co. 
SlEG, CllAS. H., & Co. . 

Skinner Chuck Co. 

SiMONDs Manfg. Co. 

Southern Pacific Co. 

Standard Underground Cable Co 

Standard Water Meter Co 

Starrett, L. S., Co. 

St. Denis Hotel . 

STRBLiNCiER, Chas. A., «S: Co 

Sturtevant, B. F., Co. 

Syracuse Cycle Co. 

Taylor, Ed. R. 

Taylor, Wm., & Sons . 

Taylor, He Merritt & Hager 



Pagb. 

76 
66 

63 
21 

74 
38 

41 
36 
16 
90 

37 
47 
33 

84 

59 

47 
28 

47 
56 

89 

78 
28 

13 



Thompson & Bushnell 
TiPPETT & Wood . 
Trinity Court School 
TuppER, W. W., & Co. . 

UlMER BELTIN(i Co. 

United States Che(^'e Bank, Ltd. 
VoLK.MANN, Chas. L. K. 
Wadsworth, FlowLAND cV Co. (Inc ) 
Warren Chemical tS: Manfg. Co. 
Warren Foundry & Machine Co. 
Waterbury Farrel Foundry & Ma 

chine Co. 
Weimer Machine Co. . 
Weston Electrical Lnstrument Co 
Whitney, Asa W. 
Whiton, I). E., Machine Co. 
Wilkinson, A. J., Co. 
Williams Bros. 
WiNSLow Bros. Co. 
WiNsoR Bicycle 
Wood, Fr.\nk .... 
Wood, R. D., cS: Co. 
Woods, S. A., Machine Co. 
Worcester Cycle Co. 



Page. 



42 



13 

35 

85 
29 

13 

22 

81 
48 

43 
60 

84 
64 
37 
45 
40 
81 

90 
94 
50 
53 
92 



TECHNIQUE ADVERTISER, 



Established 1818. 



Brooks Brothers, 

Broadway^ corner Twenty-second Street^ 
New York Qty. 

Clothing and Furnishing Goods, 

READY MAJ>E AND MADE TO MEASURE. 



READY MADE 

"Knickcrtxxkcrs'' made up plain for rough country wear or reinforced 

with buckskin for riding. 

Covert Coats ; serge^ silk^ or wool lined* 

Fancy riding Waistcoats of heavy woollens and cords. 

Scotch hand-knit stockings. Pigskin Leggings. 

In the department for Clothing to order will be found Scotch and 
English suitings in all the year round weights, and a large variety of 
other goods, giving the fullest opportunity for selection. 

In the style and cut of our ready-made clothing we have endeavored 
to guard against those exaggerations of fashion so generally found in 
lower grades of garments. 

In our Furnishing Department is a carefully selected stock of goods, 
embracing about everything in that line, and including many seasonable 
novelties not to be found elsewhere. 

In connection with this department will be found a select assortment 
of leather and wicker goods, including Luncheon and Tea Baskets, Holster 
Cases, Sheffield Plate Flasks, Riding Whips, Crops, etc.; also Golf Clubs 
of Fernie's, Dunn's, and other makes. 



TECHNIQUE ADVERTIffiR. 




The Tdkiley girk sty, 
A* at dupd they pray: 
** Help ui good nuidens to be ; 
Give m patience to wait 
Till Eomc tutsequent datet 
World without men. Ah me I 



TECHNIQUE ADVERTISER. 



J51HANC0CK INSPIRATOR... 

For Stationary, Harine, Portable 
and Locomotive Boilers 




THE nOST RELIABLE AND ECONOHICAL 
BOILER FEEDER FOR UNIVERSAL SERVICE 

Simpler in Conil ruction tlufl uy Similar Apparatai. 



HIGHEST AWAItD... 
■tWariff Muihtai 



Rndlly Repaired... 

at Smill Eipeate 
* * * 




Tbe Hancock Inspirator Co, 

n«niii«cturCT» oi Qeneral Jet Apparatus... 

ruin OHIO and Works 

WATSON STREET,... BOSTON, MASS., U. S. A. 



.^^1 I ^^:yW^^Tj ■ -■■■ 

(w I J J n\ (§ |t\ 1 1^B>\ I^ KS 

^ CELEBRATED "^ 






^TVLiiS Correct 
QiJAi.iTi iJ.-JMQUALLED 



' WA:^Hl^CiT{iW ST, BOSTON 

i'.j' t^:- r::: .-Pi r 



)2 



A is for Arlot 



TAILOR 

Leading Outfitters ol** made^^^ 

Fine Grade Mackintoshes fitting^ 

^--.; EXCLUSIVE 

j) V STYLES 

We have the exclusive trade of the principal colleges in New England... 
Special 10 per cent discount to Technology Students... 
We make a specialty at $10.00... 
$1500 and $20.00. 

Bicycle^ Tennis and Sporting GcMDds of Every Description* 

Cleve & Krim, 

Metropolitan Rubber Company, 

40 SUMMER STREET, -<2r=^^BOST0N. 



L. E. Fletcher & Co. 

Hatters and^ 
Outfitters. 

No. 158 BOYLSTON STREET, 



George H. Lane, 

CUSTOM DEPARTMENT 

Continental Clothing: House... 

No. 651 Washinfrton Street, 

Corner of Boylston Street, 

Boston, Mass. 



BOSTON, MASS. 



Ten per cent discount to Tech. men. 



Fine Clothing to Order. 



We are always pleased to compare 
our prices with others doing finrt- 
dass work 



Side entraace, No. 18 Boylston Street, op ooe fUfbt 



^ViQse coW^cc^ ^xA ^^nit^ 



Hi* little ton's du), 




For the last 20 years we have kept Piso's Cure for Coa- 
sun^jtion in stock, and would sooner think a groceryman could 
;et along without sugar in his store than we could without 
'iso's Cure. It is a sure seller.— RAVEN & CO., Druggists, 
Ccresco, Michigan, September 2, 1896 



K 



%My 



Cht OldMi... 
Car3»l and Btil 
Known... 
ollhe... 
PrltMU Schools 
ol Boston. 




Cl)auncp°l)all 
school 



jtjtjtjtjtjtjtjtjt 



pMp^ires pupils for all Collegiate and 
Scientific Instilutiotuin the shortest time 
li good work. Jf Special 
f^"«f« for the Institute. Taylor, De 
Meritte and Hagar. 

y. m. C. H. Building, 

Oppoilit il)« Instliuit. 

Back Bap, Boston. 



Che Volkmann 
School 



M*H<MM-JI^ 



TRINITY COURT, 
BOSTON. j«j»j*j»j» 



Preparatorp Scbool for Col- 
lect or Sclcnrinc ScDooIs.j' 



A. L. K. VOLKMANN. 




Arc both ptdty b&d. 



TECHNIQUE ADVERTISEEL 



j^StiMlents received at any time. •** College open througfh- 

out the year, j* Individual instruction, jt Day and Evening: jA tjk jk£ 4^ *& *ft 

sessions, j* Accountants, Stenographers and Typewritists 

supplied. j*jt>^>j*.!*j*^j(^j(Call or send for Grcular. 



BOSTON 
* COMMERCIAL ^ 
^^ COLLEGE 



Shorthand Typewriting Bookkeeping 

Arithmetic Penmanship Grammar 

Correspondence, etc. 



TH-LIAH H. HORIARTY, PrincipaL 



3 BEACON STREET, BOSTON. 




Tbc attack came in tbc "•■'■^itt* il ftit Viu^\..— ^CAtiA 'nrno. '&«. Tt^ai&.ta. 



TECHNIQUE ADVERTISER. 



g^x S"? l)eu) RocDcsten.. 




STANDARD LAHP 

OF THE WORLD 



OTHER LAMPS may b« "like" or "m good" u THE 
ROCHESTER tn amxarance. but like all jmjblicnu. 



no Smoke, no Smell... 
no Broken Cblmnept. 

Made in every conceivable desipi and fiaitfa, for all lightine 
or heating purpOEcs, and at prices to compete witli uiy.jtjt^ 

Wt)v be Content tolth anp but tbe Best. 



If your dci 
;OCHfiSTER, 



dealer cannot t 



cb< RocDcstcr Camp Co... 



42 Park Place and 37 Barclap St. 
lino Sorlc. 




PREKA 

It Staiioneri anil Engraving Hoase, 

1121 Chestnut Stmu Philadelphia. 



WEDDING INVITATIONS 
KECEPTION CARDS 
IIONDGIiAIIS 



LEGE INVITATIONS 

IGRAMIIES 

DDET MENUS 

eNITY ENGRAVING I COATS OF ARIIS 

TERNITySTATIONERyi ADDRESS DIES 

HEBALDBY m G[IIE«LBGV A SPMAin. 

COATS OF ARMS PAINTED FOB FBAMWG. 

j( j( j« j( 



rw>^i,to' 



under ibt ptrsonil 




16 



B is for Bigelow: 



Established i$44. 

Henry Guild & Son, 

^Danufacturina .... 

Jewelers 

MAKK A SPECIALTY OF ... . 

MEDALS, BADGES, 
SOCIETY PINS, and 
RINGS. 

WK ALSO MAKK THE .... 

Phi BeU Epsilon, DclU Upsilon. Sigma Alpha 
Epsilon, Theta Xi, Hammer and Tongs, K. O. S., 
and other Class Pins for the H. I. T. 

WE HAKE THE OFFICIAL H. I.T. PIN. 



A. S, ADAMS, 



WE KEEP IN STOCK AN ASSORTHENT OF DIAMONDS 

AND FINE JEWELRY. 

No. 433 Washingfton Street^ 
Q)mer Winter Street^ 

BOSTON, MASS, 




MAKER OF THE OFFICIAL 
M. L T, PIN. 

No. 8 Winter Street, Boston, Mass. 

The only Jeweler in the M. L T. 
G>-operative Catalogfue. 

Any member wearing this Pin will be allowed 
10 per cent discount on all purchases. 

We now have the above pin in a new half size, also M. I. T. 
Football Charms, and Ladies' Hat Pins. 

Silver Enamel, plain monojn'am, 75 cents. 
Silver Enamel, raised monogram, $1.00. 
lo-karat Gold, plain munoj^ram, $2.25. 

14-karat Gold, raised monogram, $5.00. 



(( 



j 



«$ 


















Shreve, Oump 



&L 



ow Companyt 




Designers and Manufacturers of 

IRIGINAL PRODUCTIONS for Racing Associations and Qubs. These 

Designs are varied, and are constantly being produced from the highest talent, 

and are appropriate for 

TENNIS TOURNAMENTS, BASEBALL, FOOTBALL, 
CRICKET, YACHT RACES, ROWING MATCHES, 
GOLF MATCHES, HORSE SHOWS, KENNEL 
SHOWS, AND EVERY DESCRIPTION OF PRIZES. 

Desig ns s ubmitted, and Estim ates furnished free o f charge , o n application. 

Original Devices and Medals a Specialty. 

The superb Silver prizes awarded by the Longwood Cricket Qub for many years have 

been designed, manufactured, and furnished by us. 

Shreve, Crump & Low Company, 

147 Tremont Street, Boston. 



^'■^'^^'^^"■■^■'''^■^'f^^ 



' 
















K VieaWSci \o vVvt m^sv 



Drain to the dregs; \7 



THE 



VlASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY, 



BOSTON. 



Francis A. Walker, Ph.D., LL.D., President. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY offers courses, each 
of four years' duration, leading to the degree of Bachelor of Science, in Civil, 
Mechanical, Mining, Electrical, Chemical, and Sanitary Engineering, in Architecture, 
Chemistry, Physics, Biology, Geology, and Naval Architecture. A less technical course, 
in General Studies, is offered to students wishing to qualify themselves for business 
pursuits. 

To be admitted to the first -year class, applicants must have attained the age of 
seventeen, and must pass satisfactory examinations in Algebra, Plane Geometry, 
English, History, French (or German), and Advanced Algebra or Solid Geometry. 

A division of these entrance subjects between two successive years is, with certain 
restrictions, permitted. 

Entrance examinations are held at the Institute in June and September of each 
year. In June, applicants are examined in New York, Philadelphia, Chicago, and other 
principal cities. A circular stating times and places is issued in advance, and will be 
mailed on application. 

Graduates of colleges and scientific schools are admitted, without examination, to 
such advanced standing as is warranted by their collegiate training. 

The catalogue of the Institute and any of the following descriptive circulars will 
be mailed free on application. 

Massachusetts Institute of Technology : an illustrated pamphlet describing 
the laboratories of the Institute. 

Of the Departments of Civil Engineering; Mechanical Engineering; Mining 
Engineering; Physics and Electrical Engineering; Architecture; Chemistry; 
Biology; General St tidies ; Naval Architecture, 

In regard to Admission of Graduates of other Colleges ; Opportunities for 
Teachers; The Lowell School of Design ; Summer Courses, 

H. W. TYLER, Secretary, 

491 Boylston Street, Boston, Mass. 



With the Big(g)elow U^ 



C itand* tor Ctom, and 




COR SALE. . . 

London " Engfineer." 

London "Engineering." 

Transactions of the American Society 
of Qvil Engineers. 

Vol, 1 XXXIV ,87., B,, DAMRELL & UPHAM, 

OTHER ENOINEERINO BOOKS. TnC Old Comef 

Book Store, 

All well bound and In good dondiiiun. For tuii ust .nd pnc^ Comer of ScHool and Washington streets 

BOSTON, MASS. 

IRA ABBOTT, Admr., 

StuJints at tlie Scliool o( Technnlogy can obtain their 
150 Broadway, New York City. Text-books at Special Prices. 



Established In 1890. 




BOOKBINDING 



ftoooooooooooooo<>o«>ooooooooo* 



Every Style. 



Binder to Massachusetts Institute Technologv. 
Museum of Fine Arts, etc., etc. 



ALEX. MOORE, 

No. 3 SCHOOL STREET, 
BOSTON. 



For Clifford^ as well* 



19 




Cbarks Ul* l>earti 

Photographer 



VVould respectfully solicit the patron- 
ao^e of Technology students for various 
kinds of individual and group photo- 
graphs — for whom we have done 
and are doing considerable work. 
% We have for years made a specialty 
of college work, having in many 
cases, for years in succession, done 
the work for Amherst, Dartmouth, 
University of Vermont, Tufts, Bos- 
ton University, Hanard Dental, Bos- 
ton Dental, Wellesley, Mt. Holyoke, 
Wesleyan, Lasell, etc., etc. 
% Special rates for *' Tech." 

Respectfully, 



\}^^^^^m^ 



394 Boylston Street, 



Near Berkeley Street. 



-xr ,rf3^ 



But the other is h— VL 



20 TECHNIQUE ADVERTISER. 




PHOTOGRAPHER. 

Boston^ 2832 Washin^on Street^ Telephone^ 10-3 Roxbury* 
Boston^ 18 Blue HiII Avenue* 

Brookline^ 27 Harvard Street ; Telephone^ 104-3 Brookline« 

Ashmont, (873 Dorchester Ave«; Telephone^ 215-3 Dorchester. 
Newtonville, 92 Bowers Street ; Telephone^ 283-4* 
Wellesley^ near the Railway Station* 

Photography in all its branches, of the highest possible qiiahty. 
Special rates to students of the M. 1. T. 



j»^j»j» SPEOAL PRICES TO STUDENTS j»j»j»j» 



The»»» 



Notman Photographic Company 

Studios : 

480 Boylston Street, ) ^^^^^^^jn BOSTON, 

3 Park Street, . . . ) 

)286 Massachusetts Avenue, ....CAMBRIDGE. 



^^^ FINE GROUPS A SPECIALTY. j»j»j» 



TECHNIQUE ADVERTISER, 

^ A j« REGULAR^ LlTTLEji BiJOU. j» 



TECHj^ 

Hair -Dressing Parlor 

Braacb o1 Hotel Thorndike. 
486 »-2 BOYLSTON STREET. 

Hair Cutting, 25. 
Shaving, 15. 
Shampoo, 25. 
Razors Honed, 25. 

T. ROSS, Proprktor. 



IDA A. MERBIAM, 

Formerly SIcnoEnpher to Unllcd State* Lcsatlan. Pvto, 



EMMA L. HEADER, 

Femerly with the General Electric Co. 



HAVE VOU WRITTEN VOUR 

theses ? 

WHETHER YOU HAVE OR 
HAVE NOT, HAVE THEM 
TYPEWRITTEN BVjtJiJtJt 

MERRIAM &MEADER, 

TREHONT TEMPLE, 717. 




If we only cotild hear what the chifi-whiikercd Moke, 
Hu ttld to the Frcihiiufi iddlctcd to tmckc, 
Wt tko might kii|4> at the >tory or joke, 
▼tiich appean to amute thctc fcmaricaUc folk. 



DRAFTING INSTRUMENTS 

SINOLV OR IN SETS. 

SCALES, CURVES, TRIANGLES, T SQUARES. 
DRAWING AND BLUE PROCESS PAPERS. 
FINE BRUSHES, COLORS, PENCILS>j«j«j«j« 

English Metallic Paper in Sheets, Blocks and Books. 



UNEXCELLED FOR PENCIL DRAWING. 




SPECIAL TERMS TO STUDENTS. 

Artists' 
Materials 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 

Sketch Boxes, Easels, Drawing Tables, Canvas, 
Tube Colors, Water Colors, 

MANUFACTURED BY 

Wadsworth, Howland & Co, 

IINCOKF-ORATKO). 

Nos. 82 and 84 Washington 5treet, 

Branch Store, Qrundmann Studios, Clarendon Street, 

Factories: Maiden, Mass. BOSTON, MASS. 

Send for our llluatrBted CaUloKti* 



'baK Wk oa ^ AickAfLt&i 



I 




•^' -^ 



"STUDENTS," ATTENTION. 

Largot Stock uid Lowat Prkci on 

P)dtDemdtical 
Instruments 



DRA\PING MATERIALS AND 
PICTURE FRAMESj«J«JIj«jM 
OF ALL KINDS ATj«j«j«jIj«j« 

Frost & Adams Company, 

iBpwltn u4 Wkskuk Deikn. 
^FBEE. No. 37 CX>RNH1LU BCBTON. 



ALTENEDER'S 

%cvcv 

IRulino pen 



To Clean : Don't touch the screw ; lilt the lever. Opened and closed instantly, and without removing the 
screw or disturbing its adjustment for width of line. 

THEO. ALTENEDER & SONS, 

945 Ridge Avenue, 

Send for Catalogue. PHILADELPHIA. 



; i* for Ehrhardl, 




See What You Are Doing! 

THERE'S NO p ABOUT IT I 

If the First Typewriter had WRITTEN IN SIGHT 
no one would have bought a "Blind" Machine. .^.M.^ 

CDe " DauSDertp Visible 



» 



PRICE. S7S.OO 



HAS IT MC3ST OF ANY. SenJ for i Machine on 
Trial. Prove what wc say. 



&uop..ofTHE Daugherty Typewriter Co.j> ki™p5Ki"nS"pa. 



\ tUl^L &kl ^U ^UCDlCk 



•s 



Vho's unnamed the jott. 



densmore; 



t The World's 
Light Running M M M ^ 1 ^ ^3 L T 1. V/ IV ^ -f Greatest Typewriter. 



" I can write much faster on the machine than with the pen, and I really think that my 
thoughts come quicker to the click of the types than they did to the noiseless flowing of the 
ink. And then there is this advantage, if anything goes wrong, you can lay it to the machine." 
— From Editor of the Critic fwbo uses a Densmore). 

<^ 

Te now make all DENSMORES with the 

Type-bars Swinging on Ball Bearings, 

like ihoM of bicycle wheels. Thi* prcventi wear tX the bearings on which aligtunent and dunUlity chiefly 
depend. It marki an era in typewriter coastruction. 

The United Statei Department of the Interior alone uks 150 Denamorcs, and the Curtodiao ny* they 
give "entire ■atlifactioo.'' 

SUPEKIOKITIES E8TABUSHBD. 

Lightest Key Touch (because of the compound levers). 
Qreatest Speed (because of tlie convertible speed 

escapement). 
riost Convenient Paper Peed {because of the unique 

paper fingers and ease with which platen is turned tu 

show writing). 
Best tor both Correspondence and rUnlfoidlng 

(because of the instantly interchangeable printing 

cylinders). 
Best System of Scales (because one scale always 

remains at the pointer and a duplicate scale at the 

writing). 

Fkci niuitnted pamphlet containing tcstimoaiaU from the United State* Government aad from many 
leading concerns. 

DENSMORE TYPEWRITER CD., 310 Broadway, New Vork. 

Had rather n cnnt. 




H it for Hun(b)ltt, 



•4*J. I. C. PAILSi^ 




Hoopi cannot come off 1 Sec tfiat Strap I 
Bottom fluih. 

Bat Mortar or Sewer Pail on the nurlut. 

Richmond Cedar Works. """^"°"'''L°f'""'"'\.. 



Gtarles Scott spting Company, 

□ermantown Ave , New Market, Canal Sis., 
PHILADELPHIA, PA., 

jelical amiZl.. 
Elliptical Spriis 

I OK EVKRY DESCRIPTION. 

CRUCIBLE STEEL MACHINERY SPRINGS, 

OIL TEMPERED, 

Of capacity from 1 ounce to 100 ton*. 



I Pike's Arkansas Oilstones 



Paknts 



HOWSON AND HOWSON 
Counsellors at Law 
Solicitors of Patents 




Arkansas Stone in Hard Rubber Box, 3i iaeba Iao[ 
by I inch wiile, $IJK) eacht in Mahogany Boi, 
75 centi each. By mail poftpaid. 

Send for Catalogue. 

The Pike Manufacturing G)., 

Pike Station, New HamptUfc, U. S. A. 



"X^aX yxa, \ muA wwn. 



Till Sukapaat.'* nd Duic 




THE A B C OF CHUCKS, 



Are you interested? 
Before buying elsewhere. 
Consult our catalogue. 



THE D. E. WHITON MACHINE CO., 
New Lonioo, Conn., U. S. A. 



Dixon's 

American Graphite Pencils 

ARE UNEQUALED for smooth, tough 
kadt, tlut hold their points better utd Ust 
lof^n than any other peacil nude. They 
ucnudc in ten degrees of hardness, suitable 
[or all kinds o( college, office or profestioaal 
work. AU stationers keep them, or sampks, 
worth double the money, will be sent on 
receipt of 16 cents 

]<^epti Dixon Crucible Co. 

Jersey Qly, N. ). 



Chucks for holding straight and taper shank drills. 
Planer Chucks- 
Round Swivel Ba«. 

Square Bue. 
Also, Face-plate Jaws. 




THE SKINNER CHUCK CO., 

lice, 94 Readr St, New Britain. C1..1J. S 



SUPERIOR 

GRAPHITE PAINT 

For BRIDGES, ROOFS, STRUCTURAL 

IRON, and aU Exposed Metal 

and Vood Surfaces. 



Detroit Graphite Mfg. Co., 

DETROIT, MICH. 



Gives me nthet a pain. 



TECHNIQUE ADVERTISE!^ 




Samson Spot Cord 

Is wutuited of pure stock and ptrfcct bf aid, 
and nuy be knomi at iU;lit by its dixtinclive 
mark — tfiespot.J«J*J*jrj*J«J*J«J*J*J«J*J« 



Samson Cordage Works, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



TheO,5.Kelly(9.' 

5;.Tingfield,01tio.USft. 



Over TS hM li No El 



ittmi IllMlnM CataJafM Kit In 




' ' n ELEVATING 

'El "conveying 

' i ' ' ' MACHINERY 

' ' PowtrTramilsaonMioliiiiirj, 




Bar.. 

Vises 



CeiDls Cool Co., 




TECHNIQUE ADVERTISER. 




•*«Sfe^ 




Do the... 

most uiork 
inthcCcast Clmt 
with tht teast effort 

anil LAST LONGEST. 



ISnlwrsallv known 
for 30 peart 
UtIK 

Standard 
of flmcrka. 



NICHOLSON FILE CO., Providence, R. I., .^S.pTr."! 1,"'.'' 




The Pen is mightier dun the Sward* 



I am not % g*Y Praf> 



Railroad Crack equipment 




The Celebrated SHOW 

Automatic... 
Safety Switch Stand 



Ramapo Frog:s, Switches, 
and Crossings. 





raHLlKG MJCeiHEIiT, 



RAMAPO IRON WORKS, Hillburn, N.Y. 



James l>unter macMne 
Companp, 

Rorth jldams, mats., 

manufaclurert or 

f rtciioti ciuici) Puiieps ana Cuc-orr 
... Couplinss. ... 

SDaftIng 

ana all Us accessories ror 
poiDcr transmission. 




Sul \ ^la^ 4i» w«i* iii 



O Imtnictor u yet; 



J. M. BGINIS, PmUMl. K. H. THOBNTON, SiHriMtiltal. 



0, 8. BOBERTS. Truunf. 



ROBERTS 



Iron Works Company 
Boiler makers, 

machinists and General iron Ulorkers, 



PLATE AND SHEET IRON 

WORK of iii docriptioot. 

STEAM BOILERS hQm 3 to 125 
Hone Power on hand and tUpped oa 
<nden al tliort notice. 



No. 92 Main Street, 

Catnbridgeport, Mass. 

TelephoDe, UI-Z Canbridie. 




OUR IMPROVED HORIZONTAL FAN 

No. 178 RAILKOAD STREKT, 

HOLYOKE, MASS. 



B. F. PERKINS & SON, 

Ventilating"' Exhaust Fans 



SCANNELL & WhOLEY, 



Steam Boilers 



stand Pipes, 
Pen Stacks, Tanks, 
Kiers, Steam Boxes, 
Steel and Iron 
Plate Work 

of Every DeBcriptlon. 



No. 24 TO 44 TANNER STREET. 
LOWELL, MASS. 



Such a *na.p I 101.7 %*^ 



42 



J is for Jamesoiit 



Charles River Iron Works, 



EDWARD KENDALL & SONS, 



STEAM BOILERS, 



WRITE FOR PRICES 

BEFORE BUYING. 




HIGH PRESSURE BOILERS 

OUR SPECIALTY. 




® 



Nos. 148 To 170 NlAiM Street, 



CAMBRIDQEPORT, MASS., U. S. A. 



Guild & Garrison, 



BROOKLYN, N. Y. 



Vacuum 
Pumps 




ALSO 



ORGANIZED 1865. 



TipPETT & Wood, 



PHILLIPSBURG, N. J., 




DESIONERS and BUILDERS of 



XKHater ITowets, 



Stanbptpes, 



Air or Qas Pressure Pumps. 
Filter Press Pumps. 
Ammonia Engines and Pumps. 
Crank and Fly-Wheel Pumps, Etc. 



and General Contractors in 

PLATE and RIYETED woii. 



A specialty made of 
Fine and Heavy 

and 



Smith Work 
Forgings 



S.licik4. 



\ Vu>^ Vu& 'vEd!ua\ 



Tbo tMclw* C E.t 



ESTABLISHED IS40. 



R. F. Hawkins 

Iron Works. 

Iron and Steel Bridges, 
Buildings, Roofs md 
Turn Tables, 
Steam Boilers, 
Iron Castings, etc. 

SPRINGFIELD, 
MASSACHUSETTS. 



! HYDRAULIC 

; Presses, Draw Benches, Accutnula- 
I tors and Power Pumps for same. 



We have built Hydraulic Machinery Equipment for 
four plants for ninking bicycle tubing. We also build 
Chain Draw Benches for drawing all kinds of tubing 
and rods. Our pamphlet, containing one hundred and 
^» 



nil 



, eighty miniature illustrations of machines we have 

i recently built, will be sent to those asking for it by 

! letter, and stating the name of the llrm or corporation 

I they are connected with. 

I The embonuiK of the Torld'* Fair Medals vu done 
with one of our Hydraulic Praatu 



American Tool & iWachine 1 8*"" "' «'"'"»«'" «'-^ 

r DRILLING MACHINERY 

Company, ^ _.„_ 

109 BEACH ST, BOSTON, MASS. tlNUl IN C, LA 1 rl CO 

l7>acMni$t$, founders 
and engineers 



Rfpairiiig aii<l Macliiiif Joliliini; at tlie 
Boston Shop. 
Estimates for speciiil work clieerfullv 
funiished. 




Full line of Power 
cliinerv iind Worrall Fr' 



Tra 



Ma. 



I Clutches. 

■ I 

UnlitUng tta.y be. 



PRENTICE BROS. 

WORCESTER. MASS. 



TECHNIQUE ADVERTISER. 



THE NILES TOOL WORKS COMPANY, Hamilton. Ohio. 



LABOR-SAVING 

TOOLS. 

HEAVIEST TYPES, 

OUR SPECIALTY. 

Cooiplitc Equipnufltl foe 
Machine Shops of iH kindfc 
Cbncipanileiiu nlicited. 
TriU for CataloEUC 



NewYoA, 

PhiUdclphuL, 




Hcnizontal Boring, Drilling and Milling Machine, at work of Heavy Casting. 



Every machine running in your 
works is a monument to your in- 
telligence or ignorance ^ — -a money 
maker or a money eater. 
•••• 



The Flat TufTct Latfw will do oearly all your lathe work under 2 inches in dumetcr and leu 
than 24 inches long. It wiH save S>.000 to $1,500 over lathe woi^ and $400 to $600 over any olhtr 
turret machine. Sold on Guarantees. Our own rcprexntativcs will call on tcquat. " Rapid Lathe 
Tork" sent free. 




JONES & LAMSON MACHINE CO., 

SPRINGFIELD, VT., U. S. A. 




She : Hive you ever pbycd Golf before ? 
He: Certainly! haven't you *ecn mc? 
She: Yea; that's why I aikc4. 



A. J. Wilkinson & Company, 



a 
(A 

«] 

c 



X 
u 




180 TO 188 Washington Street, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



^■l\il SvX }!lWJ\ ^uui 



( 



The ilowcat of n 




8TARRETT'S**««*»«^ 



A Graduate 
of "Tech" 



" BOOK OF TOOLS," 

for Mflal Torkcre, 540 paect, 2,000 Illus- 
tration^ lUtd miTJ^iMiJ^J^J^^J^J^^J^J^^J^ 

"WOOD-WORKERS' TOOLS," 

to be out about May 1st, 1897, is well equip- 
wd in cveryttiinB conccmioe[ Macfuneiy, 
Toob, and SuppUes for the battle of lite. 



Send 25 cents for each Book to 

Chas, A. Strelinger & Q)., 

Box K, Detroit, Mich. 



.TOOL Co. ' 




STARRETT'S TOOLS •"!§§& 

Send for ninety-eigbt page 
Illustrated Cataloeue«l>Jt 



The L. S. Starrctt G>mpany, 
Box 61, Atfiol, Mam. 





Q^^e^q^^. 






I Simonds«?*Mantifacttiring>i^Company 

I Fitchburg, Mass. Chicago, lU. 

I 42 Cortlaodt Street, New York, N. Y. 

I 2)5 Magazine Street, New Orleans, La. 

1 

Simonds Saw Qnupany^ 

San Francisco, Cal. Piatbiui, Ore 



To the floor ot tui den. 



48 L begins to spell Lanza; 



ESTABLISHED 1856. 



Warren Foundry and Machine G). 



Works at Phillipslmrgf^ New Jersey. 



Sales Office, • • • • J60 Broadway, New York* 



CAST IRON WATER AND GAS 



PIPE 



FROM 3 TO 48 INCHES DIAMETER. 

s of Flanged Pipe and Special Casting! 

Also, Pipe suitable for Culverts and Road Drains. 



The Pratt & Whitney G)mpany, 

^ ^ Hartford, Conn*, U* S* A* ^ ^ 

DESIGNERS AND MANUFACTURERS OF 

MACHINE TOOLS 

For GENERAL and SPECIAL SERVICE in MACHINE and RAILWAY SHOPS, 

and AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENT WORKS. 

Flour Mill Roll-Grooving Machinery^ Drop Hammerst Punching Pfesses, Bolt Cutters, Die Stocks, Taps, 
Diest Reamers, Standard Size and Thread Gauges, Milling Cutters, Cutters for Teeth of 
Gear Wheels, Renshaw Rachet Drills, Combination Lathe Chuclo, 

Kennedy's Patent Spiral Shear Punch. 

Standard Measuring and Testing^ Machines. Automatic Weighing^ Machines. 

Brass Finishing Machinery. 

Factories equipped with complete plants of Machines, Fixtures, Small Tools and Gauges for the manufacture 
of Guns, Sewing Machines, Bicycles, Typewriting Machines, Brass Goods, and sirnilar articles requiring inter- 
changeable parts. 

We shall be pleased to furnish Catalogues, and also illustrations descriptive of various machines not included 
in the Catalogue, together with complete Price Lists. In writing us, please mention "Technique." 



You tavoX ^ \r^ \)^ V^m^ | 



\ 



And at the first sound* 



49 









u.r «;• 



RHODE ISLAND TOOL CO 




PROVIDEIKE, RHODE ISUUID. 













p. O. Box 1567. 



Telephone 2979. 



H. N. Bates Machine Company, 

Nos. 240 to 246 Congress Street, 



Manufacturers and Dealers In 



BOSTON, MASS., U, S. A. 



Power Transmission Machinery 

Dynamos and Motors 

New England Agency for 

Erie City Iron Wotk^ Steam Engfines, Boilers^ and Pumps* Acme Oil 
Filters* Chattanoos:a Wood Sput Pulleys^ Hoyt^s Standard Babbitt 

Metals.,^j*j*«^«^ 

Friction Ptslleyst Friction Coupli^^s, Self-oiling Hangers^ Iron Pulleys (whole and split ), Im- 
proved Mule Pulley Standst Improved celt Tighteners, Quarter Twist Belte* Adjustable Belt Carriers. 
Commutators refilled* Portable Key-seating Machinest sprocket Wheels and Link Beltings Dynamos, 
Transformers, Electric Motors, Dynamo and Lamp Parts, Fleming Arc Lamps.«^«^«^Low Prices and 
Prompt Delivery .«^«^«^Catalogue and Discount Sheet sent on application. 



^ 
^ 

^ 



And to stamp on the ^toutvd. 



TECHNIQUE ADVERTISER. 




Mathew's Sing'lc and DouUc 
Valve Fire Hydrants. 

Valve Indicator Posts. 

Eddy Valves, Lamp Posts,ttc. 

Gasholders and Gas 
Machinery. 




TECHNIQUE ADVERTISER. 



Lowell Machine Shop, 

LOWELL. MASS. 




Cotton l))acl)i!ierp 



OEBORIPTION. 



Improved Cotton Machinery 



^Koi- SPINNING, 
SPOOLING, 
NVARPING, 
DYEING, 
REKLING, 
TWISTING, 

and WEAVING. 



Draper Company, 

-^^HoPEDALE, Mass. 



52 M stand for Bird Masters, 



LEONARD & ELLIS^^of 



Sole Hanutecturers of 




Valvoline Lubricating: Oils, 

WILLIAPI JAMES OOULDINQ, nanaeer. 

No. 149 Broad Street, Boston, Mass. 

VALVOLINE LUBRICATING OILS are manufactured in the followinjj: grades, each grade having several 
qualities, varying in price, according to the crude oil used, and the extent to which they have been retined 
and filtered. 

Valvoline Cylinder Oils, Valvoline White Loom Oils, Valvoline 

Sewing-Machine Oils, Valvoline Machine Oils, Valvoline Spindle 

Oils, Valvoline Watch and Cloclc Oil, Valvoline Axle Oil. . . . 

CAUTION. — The acknowleJf^ed reputation of VALVOLINE OILS has prompted other parties offering Inferior Oils to use th« 
word Valvoline in making: sales. The consumer is cautioned that the (genuine Oil Is always invoiced and branded VALVOLINE. 
and is not sold by us to Oil Dealers. 

OUR OILS ARE WARRANTED. AND SATISFACTION GUARANTEED. 



JEWELL BELTING COMPANY, 



TANNERS OF 



©ak Beltina Xeatbcr, 



riANUFACTURERS OF 



Short Lap Oak Belting. 



^^1 ^^1 ^^1 ^^1 



Tanneries: Jellico, Tenn.; Rome, Ga. ^ Main Office and Belt Factorv, 

Hartford, Conn. 



¥oT 3i cou^\e ol dktvwvR.^ 



ThoM fint lunu ii Frank I 



WOOD -WORKING MACHINERY 



Spedafly ulapU d for 

Industrial 
Schcx)Is, 

Cofleges, 
jt Etc. 

Our line ii complete. 




S. A WOODS MACHINE CO. 

172 High Street, Boston, Mass. 



WOOD-WORKINQ MACHINERY 

OF EVKRV DESCRIPTION . 

HIGHEST CLASS— LARGEST LINE. 

make of Woi-d-Working Machinery is 
;, and more is being sold to-day, 
than any otlier. 
This leils tlie tale . . . 





J. A. FAV & CO., L.T,..t.„dB«, 

BB4-B74 Woat Front St., Cincinnati, O. Mul'ipl* VenicaK: 




Handicapped ? 

Yes, when you attempt with antiquated 
machinery to compete with those using up to 
dale. We manufacture UP-TO-DATE LABOR- 
SAVING WOOD -WORKING MACHINERY for 
Planing Mills, Sash and Door Work, Furniture 
Factories. Wheel and Vehicle Makers, Car 
Shops, Pattern Makers, etc. Some 150 of the 
machines are shown on our Poster, and all are 
described in our 312-page Catalogue, a copy 
of which we wit) send to those having use for it. 




THE EGAN CO., 



CINCINNATI, OHIO. 



Te ha,ve t^m to \iurik. 



N rtafidi for ibc oamt of 



Cbe Dcane^^rajan, 



Steam Pumps 

$M« .. 
DUPKX... 

Coinpound 
Ciiple expansion 



'ower 



single... 
Duplex... 
triplex... 




DEANE Dnplex Mile Pomp ind Electric Motor. 



Prof. WillUun H. Nllo. 



5TEAnPunpCo.. 



Battle Creek, 
,. Mich. 




nAXinun™5TSEnGTH.SinPLICITY«"''5EI!VIC£, 
ninmun "WEIGHT. WEAR '""WASTE. 

WE HAVE DISCACDED MAIIY WEABiriG PAPTS 

fOUND in OTHER PUMPS AND GET OUR 

RESULTS WITH WHAT IS LEFT. 

17.000 SOLD 

IM EIGHT YEARS. 



TECHNK2UE ADVERTISER. 



THE 



PULSOMETER STEAM PUMP 

Often Imitated, Never Equaled. 
Over 20.000 in Use. 

RECENT IMPORTANT IMPROVEMENTS. 

The Handlesl, Simplesl, and Most EHIclenl Steam Pump 

For General Mlnlnf, QnarryinK, Railroad, Irritatlnf, Draiainf, Coal-washiit, 

Sewer and Bridge Coalraclors' Parposes, elc. 

MUDDY OR GRITTY LIQUIDS HANDLED WITHOUT INJURY TO PUMP. 

Pulsometer Steam Pump CO., 



PERRIN, SEAMANS & CO.. H. E. Aienlt, 57 Oliver SIrcel, Bcttoa. Miu. 




B. F. STURTEVANT COMPANY, 

BOSTON, 

=ACTURERS OF 

The Sturtevant Blowers, 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



BOSTON, MASS. 





Exhaust Fans, Forges, Gates, 
jgj Steam Engines, Steam Fans, 



Sturtevant System of . '. . 

Heating and Ventilation. 



BRANCH STORES : 

j4 Oliver street, Boston. Mass. 
151 Liberty Street. New York. N. Y. 
IB North 3d Street, PliilaJelphia, Penn. 

16 South Canal Street, Chiat,"!. "1- 



75 (>"«n Victoria Street. London. E. C. England. 
21 West Nile Street, Glasgow. Scotland. 
87 Ziminersirasse. Berlin, Germany. 
2 KungsholinstorK, Stockholm, Sweden. 



m 




Inte Puty: Will you bring me a $poon, or not? 

Taitcr; Very lorry, aii but you see tfxm Tech. Sophomom dtocd here 
last night, and we Itaveo't had time to get any ^oons liiicc. 



O ttandf for Praf. Oibone, 



RockDrillStHir Compressors 



.MINING 
MACHINERY 



The RAND ROCK DRILLS (worked by ilcam 
or comprencd ur) ue timplc and compact in conttruc- 
don, itTane, uid built on the inUrcfungcablc part 
syiUm. -'' '■ ■ 



/Sill 





Jlir... 
Comprc$$or$«»e 



OLul tttck Drill. 



For operating Air Lift Pomps, Rock 
Drills, Coal Cutting; Machines, Air 
Hoists and Pneumatic Tools. 



Our COMPOUND DUPLEX OOH- 
PRE^OR is perfect in re^uktioa, and 
iatcfidcd for thoK who wuh the moct 
economical multi even in tniall plants. 
Connunption of fuel and wear cri ma- 
chine strictly proportioned to work 
done. Has many other attractive 
features. 



Crand drill CO. J 

100 BROADWAY, NET YORK. 



On &»X »i\>i«.1 ft* ^KJ^ 



VEo wrote the null book 5^ 

THE PELTON WATER ItHEEL 

THE PELTON SYSTEM OF POWER. 

In ilmpllcily of conMru<:li<in. ahsencf of Hearing p>>n>, high effidencv and racllitv of adiipUlion lo varying conditiDui- 
oF Kr>jcc, Ihc PELTON "in:!! mart fully alt requirrmenU than miy other n'hecl >niule. Prnpositions given for tfae dcvelop- 
Dirnl of wiUfr powen. b.iMd upon dir«t ;.p|.ll(:ilion. ot ELECTRIC TRANSMISSION under any head and anv nqulrcmeot 
as to capacity. Carr«BpondencB Invfted. Catalogue furnished upon application. 

Addr... PELTON WATER WHEEL CO. 

121-23 M^ Street, San Fnndaat, Cai., or 143 Liberty Street, New York. 



i^ZATER iAZHEE 



WATCH WHIKLS ADAPTED TO ALL HIAO PRCBSUIIEt FROM 

3 FEET TO 2,000 FEET. 

tWerflanta. Slal^ your Hud and Kal" and send for plmphlel.™'"*" 

AUTOMATIC and rr-Nrr*TATI? 
THROTTLING -C-W LxllM H 

Bidll 111 litcM tlyle, of b»t duien and hEshcst excellence. &Ucs from j-Horae 
Fairer upward, wilh luitable boilers of iteel ot Iron olatet. State vour ivanis anil 



JAMES LEFFEL & CO., Sprinfftald, Ohio, U.8.A. --^^ 




TUERK WATER MOTOR 




Represents the latest and highest development of Water 
Wheels for high pressure. 

Especially a<lapted for Hydrant Pressure, A 
perfect power for Sewing Machine, Coffee Mill, 
Chinch or Parlor OrKan, Printing Office, Machine 
Shops, and all similar uses. 

SEND FOR CATALOCUE. 

STANDARD WATER METER COMPANY, 

SUCCESSORS TO 

TUERK HYDRAULIC r>OWER CO. 
NEW YORK. CHICAGO. 



b K) lOTTY he took^ 




WEIMER 

Machine Works Company 



LEBANON, PENN. 



Bipu)ingenjiies|,;riV?'SS.?s;ri 
General roacl)lii«rpi.,.«p..r.... 

Il-IMI CAr< roR I I01'I'>CIN11ER AND METALS. 
II vll ^tll d SliiiJirJ and Narrow Gaug* 111 Trii*. 



Compound Corliss engines ;:,;"i 

iron Castings fr„,,.„.„,™.,. 

r-RICES LOW- 



T„ YI fn "SI""""""'"""""" ERASER & CHALMERS, 
E AL,V^IV Water Wheel '"'^^SiiKferS'S'S.T''' 



N HORIZONTAL SHAFT. 




^■rs and f ixn-slep; 



iportlons, IfisurifiK hlgh- 




Manufacturers of Power, Minii^, and 

Kc"i°' mall di.mJ^; .l™'n« "mw^conimo ''"''"''" *''''^'' MetalluTgical Maciiincry. 

Sollcil corKsr«nd*nce wilh ,,tt,rncr to Mlnlni Sup. 

ESicitacy, Economv »nd Excclltncc plie* *"' '•'^ '"" 'ouipmei" o* MHIfne, Siwit- 

FuUy GuarantMd. '"<=■ Co''«"<"""K- ""J Whtr Reduction PlmU. 

Rkdlei Watcrworfci, Pumpi, Air Con^TaKni Hodti, 

Humphrey Machine Co., Ke....N.H. i ca,.lo„»„o?%™=?!S*'°^"°°°' 



^nui tna&E sutVi 1 



ilim And lo tallf 



Air Furucc RcflaHl Milleifele Iron Cisllnfg. Soft and Smsolh Gray Iroo Cistlnfs. 

SUPERIOR STEEL CASTINGS 



Gradi I. StM 



FROM 1-2 OUNCE TO 200 POUNDS tN WEIGHT. 

C^Blings thnt »ill hend. Ihough n 



chlnu. Typewriters and wnsU 



whkh wlU harden 

|.nrl> of ScwiDg na- 
Maehlncry. Dentist*' 
Klilch rw|Ulrc a hlih 



Omh. ate. Th[> gr.« 



iii.-d Connecting Kodi, Crowbcad^ Fine-pitch 

pi:ci;iJIy ad^ipted for Hydraulk and 

e gaaranteed air tight, 

:i, unil h;is u higher tcnillc Mrength. 



and other riachlnery. 

SiMclally adapled 



CuarH Pilch lor Slldlni 



BICYCLE STEEL J^''^ ,.., „„, „ c, 

Hmgara, Seat Poit Luga. Frame Connection*, Sprocket*, etc 

STANLEY Q. FLAGQ & CO., 




The Benjamin Atha & 
lllingworth Co. 

Harrison, N. J., 
Manufacturers of 

Merchant Bar Steel 
Steel Forgings 
Steel Castings 

Hicheit qtuUty 

Tool Steel 
Champion 
Champion Extra 
Champion Special 



"R.MushetV Special Steel 

Is Ihe original, and tlie ONLY THOROUGHLY 
UNlfORM, stflf-liardeniii)! steel. It is also 
tlwrouglily RELIABLE. 

For over 20 years it has lield a unique 
position in tlie markets of Hie United States, and 
naturally enougii many have tried to imitate its 
virtues ; but for all purposes for which the 
".Wushet's" is especially recommended, we are 
constantly in receipt of evidence from tlie princi- 
pals of the leading Machine Shops of the United 
States that it is the most durable, thoroughly 
RELIABLE, and consequently the cheapest Steel 
they can obtain. 

Th^TiaJe .Warks gt ■ R. Moihefs Special Sleer ' »nl R. Mushel's 



Sole represenintlves la (be Ualled Slatci, 

B. M. JONES & CO., 

Nos. II & 13 Oliver St., BOSTON. 
No. 143 Liberty St., NEW YOKK. 



Two ytiti from \&st (aU. 



42 



Q II one of the letten 



THE PITTSBURGH REDUCTION CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



iHuminum '^^:^t 

Cubes* and Castings. 



ALFRED E. HUNT, QEO. H. CLAPP. 

PRESIDENT. SECRETARY. 

Main Officest 

To which all correspondence should be 
directedt No. 121 Third Avenue, .... 
PITTSBURG, PENN., U. S. A, . . . 

Vorks, ^ 

New Kensington, Westmoreland County, ^%g 
Penn. ; Niagara Falls, Niagara Co^ N. Y. *"^ 

A New York Store, 
Jgg Nos. 10 and 11 Havemeyer Building, 26 
Cortlandt Street. 

Chicago Store, 132 Lake Street. 

Philadelphia Store, No. 360 Bullitt Buikiing, 133 

South Fourth Street. 



GOLD MEDAL, PARIS* 1889. 



SSOP'S 



Best English Too! Steel 

FOR .... 

DRILLS, 
DIES, 
TOOLS, Etc. 

Maonfactory, SHEFFIELD. ENGLAND. 
Chief Amerlcao Depot, 91 Joba Street, New York. 

W. F. WAONER. Gcicral Maufcr. 

Wm. Jessop & Sons, ltd. 

ESTABLISHED OVER A CENTURY AGO. 



STEEL 



Medal, World's Columblmn Exposition, 1893. 



CRESCENT STEEL CO 



Pittsburg, 

Pa. 



Manufacturers of 



Tool and die steel 



OF THE FINEST QUAUTY 



Rock Drill Steel, 



POLISHED DRILL RODS AND FINE WIRE, SELF- 
HARDENED STEEL, SHEET STEEL for Saws, Knives, 
Spring etc ; SPRING AND MACHINERY STEEL • • • 



Die Blocks 

Millinjc Cutter B|anks^ . 

Colled Spring:^ 

Steel Forg:in](s, etc. . . . 



DENVER, COL. NEW YORK, N. Y., 

1600 I7th St. 478 and 480 Pearl St. 



CHICAGO, ILL, 
64 and 66 So. aiatoo St. 



'WVittv lV\t^ V«o\i^V. CL\\^\-.^* 



Left out by mtstakf.» 



63 



CHAS. MILLAR & SON, Selling Agents, Utica, N- Y. 



--^ J J - — '_/~~A J J J I J J — J J J — ^ 



^NGED PIPE 
AND FITTINGS. 
HYDRANTS. 
GATES. 
PIG LEAD. 
JTE, ETC. 



CKST IRON PIPE 

and Specials for Water and Gas« 

WHOLESALE EASTERN AGENTS 

AKRON VITRIFIED SEWER PIPE. 



Manufacturers of 
LEAD PIPE. 
SOLDER. ETC. 

Jobbers of 
PLUMBERS' and 
TINNERS' GOODS 



Jti^ 5c*ti^-t<s»,X- hjLOyCJL^^y^J^ /55«^Mr»«-* 



Rome Brass and Copper Co 



ROTWE. N.Y. 



MAXUFACTt'RERS OF 



$l)eet and Bolt Copper, 



SHEET BRASS, WIRE, TUBING. 



stimates furnished on Manufactured Articles* ^ ^ ^ 



His christenm|r to make* 



R it Robert H. Ridttidfc 



Cupola Mixtures the root 

■^ BOILER. 

For Uk in Your 0«m 
P«tnidrv lo IfMure 

SPECIFIED QUALITY. 



High TnuwvcrM Strength uui Rctilkncc Eco- 
nomically Attained wilh Tcmik Sircnftb 

OF 30,000 TO 40,000 POUNDS, 

In Turned Ted Piecwt 
With or without uk of Charcoal Pig Iron. 

ADIlHKSA 

ASA W. WHITNEY, 

loOl CallowhIII Street, 

PHILADELPHIA, PENN. 



rWATKl TVW) 




SUadi UariviM far Safclr, EcoMMr '>' DarabKlr- 
Faraiibei Pry Sleaa RapMIr- 

ABENDROTH & ROOT MFG. CO. 

28 Cliff Street, New York. 




"CAHALL" 

Vertical Water Tube Boilers. 
BABCOCK & WILCOX 

Horizontal Water Tube Boilers. 

AULTMAN & TAYLOR MACHINERY CO. 

mansfield. ohio. 

Send for Illustrated Catalogue. 

CAHALL SALES DEPARTMENT: 

Bank of ConmBrc* Building. Pllliliurgh, Pi. 
Dr«itl BIdg . Phlladelphli, Pi. The Rackirr. Chicago. 

Tirlor BIdg . H<* York. N. T. CuTihoga Bldg..Cln*land.D. 

TraniDnl B1dg..Bailan.Maii. Pirin BTdg.. Cliclnnid. 0. 

PinJniulirBankBldg.,DatrnlLMIch. TlZUninnSt..H.Orlaani.La. 



K K^W o\ mtV^, 



^!nto Icnowi Jmut toiaat 



THEY 



SPEAK jT* Themselves. J 
iear Cutters... I A^^^^^f.i^^'^^^/^a^,^ 




Eterhardl't Patenl 

;wTrre,"'*IOtbCedlnn'"acarCutter. | ♦ 






State UNiveRoiTr. 



jf^ j Shapers... 




lUHLC TRIPLE QUICK STROKE "< 
—y ..-.,. (rplADF MABK) 

ei-V)£..=-o<r^ni/.^^^C-J j Eberhirffs Pilent " Extension Ba«" Shaper. 

g6ulD~& EBERHARDT, 
f High Class Machine Tools, 'Tr*l;£:E3s"-''"'""- 

To judge by all ugni. 



tfandi [or Prof. Sedgwick, 




Automatic Engines 



SIMPLE AND COMPOUND 
ROLLINS ENGINE COMPANY, ^ NASHUA, N. H. 




AT THE ARMORY. 
Col. ConiminiUnt : What tut thrawa yaut coeoftay into mkIi diiorder. Captain? 
Cipt. A.) Pleuc tlr, it's the peanut ihcUi tlwladinin the gallery arc thrawing. 



^TWt ^\al ^Q raitutAftv, 



Tho lechiM* on gttmt. 




Steam 
Engines 

thorcK^li technical 
trainipgi the bat 
mechvucAl akiUf uui 
good buBncK mcthodt 



The Ball 4 Wood Go. 

Office: 

No. IM LIBERTY ST., 

NEW YORK. 

Work*: 

ELIZABETH, N.J. 




And dult) on aU wonia. 



TECHNK3UE ADVERTISER. 



*.Buckepc engine Companp.. 

SALEM, OHIO. 

Horizontal and Vertical Engines 




Condensing and Non-Condensing, Simple, Compound 
Multiple Cylinder, for all Classes of work. 



and 



Boston Orf 



No. 415 John Hancock Build 



UNENEri^f,Q>^ 



BipbHl, Aiifclo. Iluu'iu, Itiuo 



The "LINENE" arc the Beit and Most 
EconoDilcal Colkn and Cuffs worn ; tbey are 
nude of fine cloth, both sides finished alike, 

I and, being reversible, one collar is equal to two 
at any other kind. 

They look like linen, and are the only goodt 
Ihal a well'-dmscd gentleman can wear in place 
of real linen. 

I They are not to be washed ; all laundry trou- 

I bk and expense are avoided. 

They ate perfect fitting, retaining Ibcir shape 

I better than any other goods. 

, A box of Ten Collars or Five Pairs of Cuffi 
for Twenty-five Cents. 

I A Sample Collar and Pair of Cuffs by mail 

I for Six Cents. Name style and siie. 

Reoerslbk Conar Companp, 

I 77 Franklin Street, New York. 

, 27 Kilby Street, Boston. 



HOISTING ENGINES 

For Engineers, Builders, Mines, Fia^ 
naces. Pile Driving;, Excavating;, etc. 



Durable... 




*^tdseru)ood manufacturing Cq.* 

se Liberty Street, New York. 

BOSTON. J -I 

CMIOAOO. •-■.- 



TECHNIQUE ADVERTISER. 



CROSBY 



Steam Gage and 
Valve Company. 




The Crosby Steam Engine 
Indicator 

StnndK imrtvallpd for Perreclion of Deeign Hnd Workmanship 
and for the remnrknlile nccurnty or lU diagrams. 



It is the Standard in Electric Light and Electric 
Railway Stations. 

When required, the Crosbv IsniCATOR will be TurniBhed 
with Sargent's Electrical Attachment, b;' which any num- 
ber uf dingrams ma^ be tnken simultaneously. 




Crosby 
Patent Gage Tester. 

This machine is designed and constructed 
scientific principleE, and is a standard of 
thematical accuracv. 

Crosby 
Pop Safety Vaive. 



approved hy the I'nitcd Slates 




^^■■liil 

Pop Smtety Valve 

The Crosby indicator, together with the Crosby Pop Safety Valve, Water Relief Valve, 
Muffled Pop Safety Valve, Improved Steam Pressure Qage, Pressure Recording Oage, Safety 
Water Oage, Revolution Counter, Original Single Bell Chime Whistle, Spring Seat Qlotw and 
Angle Valves, Bosworlh Feed-Water Regulator, Branden Patent Pump Valve, and many other 
Specialtles used In connection with Steam, Air and Water, are 

MANUFACTURED ONLY BY THE 

CROSBY STEAM QAQE AND VALVE CO., 

naln Office and Worka : Stores ; Boston, New York, Chicago, 

BOSTON, MASS., U. S. A. and London. Eng. 

QqU HadBl, Parli, I8SV ; flcdil and Dlplona, ChloKo. I89J ; Qold ricdal and Diploma. Atlanta, 1898. 



P ii Mr. Panano, 




WEIMER 

Machine Works Company 



LEBANON, PENN. 



Bloiplns_|En|inM|i^l'','.5-?SS?S""S 
ficneral n)acblnerpi.,.iipurc<>„, 

IfAtl rare FUH Lroilll CINDER AND META15. 



Compound Corliss Engines ,';.",:;■„,';; 

Slifet Ri11r.<aJ Service. 

iron Castings „..,„..„„«. 

PRICES I.OW. 



T YI f n "^'"'•"'""^•^ FRASER & CHALMERS, 



I, inil Erith. Ktnl, Englan 



nORIZONTALSHAFT. 





Consiilsnl d»jl£n, wllh economlt proporlions. insurinE hiKh- . -- , , _. __, , , 

"' a3''""'K'- *'*,v* """" "^^ '^h"" ""h" i''''"'« '" ""„',''' ' Manufacturers of Power, Mining;, and 

■condlllOM o( uie than common to niher wheels: olten maklnr — _ „ , __ \ , '*' 

buii^t^U^ii'jijJ^ewI w7bU" ""o» com''^^^ "'"^ Mctallurgical Machinery. 

£fficLCDCy> Economv Uld Excellence plie^ and Ihe rull e^gulpirent of Milling. Smeft- 

Folly GwJnatud. \ "■"■ '^•'•'"•"■"'•"«- "J ""'" R'l"'""" Pi«i.. 

Riedkr Waterworfci, PumpCf Air Q u n p wow, Hoa^ 

Humphrey Machine Co., k««,».ii. „„,„„„ o^p^SST""""^ 



^nto nu&t tuc^ ^ 



So dim and m Ull, 



Air Finiace RefineJ MilleaUe Iron Cistincs. Soft and Smoolb Qriy Iron CistlBfB. 

SUPERIOR STEEL CASTINGS 



-2 OUNCE TO 200 POUNDS IN WEiOHT. 



Gr 


.DI 1. St«l 


Cnitii 


■g« 1 


h:il wilt h<^ 


nd. I ho 


«gh n 


« ..r high 




MfenKth; loll 






madhincd. 




Will 1 


iMtdcnby 




,y ««ll.<Ml3. 






B thi* <n.d^ 








ing- til 




do hy ; 








of E»ln| n«. 


chlnM. 












D*atl*U- 


■nd Surslc*! InalrumEiiti 


nntl 


Cutlnss 


Which 


requi 


r. . blih 



cnglh, fcir 



llilv I 



high 



Tool iind ticncrjl M»cliinc I 

tniall iiiid mcdiuin iiicd ConiwctlBK Kedm, Craaiheads, Flna-pltdi 
dean, etc. Tbi* gr.iric inxy Ik niiidc In harden, and pniscKso high 
electrical iKnnciihiliiy. Also Bp>-i:ially adiipted for llydraullc bimI 
lea nadrinc Pittlni* which an luaranlced air ilsht. 

Ci»DI III. Uhir<]vr.»iAcr,;in<lh:.sahlghcrt*Mlk*tr«nnl>. 

wd ii ipecially adapi.d fi.r Qearlns <tl C«rac Pilch tar Sliding 
Surface*, Airtcultural and olhcr na<hlner>. 
BICYCLE STEEL I'"'""' 'S:^ ■"' 




STANLEY Q. FLAQQ & C0./°"' 



PMILADELPNIA. PA. 


nd Hanlllan St. 



The Benjamin Atha & 
lllingworth Co. 

Harrison, N.J., 

ManufAclunn of 

Merchant Bar Steel 
Steel Forgings 
Steel Castings 

Hi{ftest quality 

Tool Steel 
Champion 
Champion Extra 
Champion Special 



"R.Mushet's" Special steel 

Is thtf oriKiiiil. and tlw ONLY THOROUGHLY 
UNIFORM. self-liardeniiiK steel. It is also 
th-iroufthiy RELIABLE. 

Fur (iver 2u years ii lus lield a unique 
position in tlie nurketsof ilie United States, and 
naturally enout;li many have tried to imitate its 
virtues; but fur all purposes for which the 
"Mushet's" is especially recommended, we are 
constantly in receipt of evidence from llie princi- 
pals of the leading Macliine Shops of Ihe United 
Slates that it is Ihe most durable, thoroughlv 
RELIABLE, anJ consequently the cheapest Steel 
ihey can obtain. 

The TraJe MarkN of " R. ML.hd'i Sr«:lal 5l»l"and R. Mushcl's 



Sole represcalatlves la Ihe Ualled Stalei. 

B. M. JONES & CO.. 

Nos. II & 13 Oliver St., BOSTON. 
No. 143 Liberty St., NEW YORK. 



Two ytin bom \ut taU. 



^ 



Q is one of the lettcfs 



THE PinSBURGH REDUCTION CO. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



illutn)tium '^UT: 

Cubes, and Castings. 



ALFRED E. HUNT, QEO. H. CLAPP, 

PRESIDENT. SECRETARY. 

Main Offices, 

To which all correspondence should be 
directedt No* 121 Third Avenue, .... 
PITTSBURG, PENN., U. S. A* . . . 

Vorks, ^ 

New Kensington, Westmoreland G>unty, ^j^ 
Penn. ; Niagara Falls, Niagara Co*, N* Y* 

^ New York Store, 
jS^ Nos* 10 and 11 Havemeyer Building, 26 
Cortlandt Street* 

Chicago Store, 132 Lake Street* 

Philadelphia Store, No* 360 Bullitt Buikiing, 133 

South Fourth Street* 



aOLD MEDAL, PARIS, 1889. 



SSOP'S 



Best English Tool Steel 



FOR .... 



DRILLS, 
DIES, 
TOOLS, Etc. 



Maoufactory. SHEFFIELD. ENGLAND. 
Chief Americao Depot, 91 Jobo Street, New York. 

W. F. WAQNER, Ocwral Maufcr. 

wm. Jessop & Sons, ltd. 

ESTABLISHED OVER A CENTURY AGO. 



STEEL 



Medal, World's Columbian Exposition, 1893. 



CRESCENT STEEL CO. 



Pittsburg, 
Pa. 



Manufacturers of 



Tool and die steel 



OF THE FINEST QUALITY 



Rock Drill Stebl 



POLISHED DRILL RODS AND FINE WIRE, SELF- 
HARDENED STEEL, SHEET STEEL for Saws, Knives, 
Spring etc* ; SPRING AND MACHINERY STEEL • • . 



Die Blocks 

Milling Cut ter Blanks 
Coiled Springs 



Ol \ 



\ 



Steel Forgings, etc. . . . 



DENVER, COL., NEW YORK, N. Y., 

1600 17th St. 478 aod 480 Pearl St. 



CHICAGO, ILL, 
64 and 66 So. Clintoii St 



Vhen tVvtv Vwom^VvX C W.\-.^, 



Left out by miitakf, 



63 



CHAS- MILLAR & SON, Selling Agents, Utica, N- Y. 



f c 



FLANGED PIPE 
AND FITTINGS. 
HYDRANTS. 
GATES. 
PIG LEAD. 
JUTE. ETC. 



CKST IRON PIPE 

and Specials for Water and Gas* 

WHOLESALE EASTERN AGENTS 

AKRON VITRIFIED SEWER PIPE. 



Manufacturers of 
LEAD PIPE. 
SOLDER. ETC. 

Jobbers of 
PLUMBERS' and 
TINNERS' GOODS 




rScrv^^ 



jpfT' S-C^t^Co'X^y/L^ hl,ekX-A.>Uy\J^ /%4A^^^^.c>t 





Rome Brass and Copper Co 



R07VTE. N. Y. 



MANUFACTURERS OF 



Sl)eet and Bolt Copper, 



SHEET BRASS, WIRE, TUBING. 



Estimates furnished on Manufactured Articles* ^ ^ n:^ 



His christening to make* 



R it Robert H. Rkhudi. 



Cupola Mixtures I THE Root^^*-"™-^ 

Fof Um in Your Own ' 

Foundry to Iiuurc 

SPECIFIED QUALITY. 



Kgb Truuvtnc Strength and Resilience Eco- 
nomically Attained with Teniik Strength 

OF 30,000 TO 40,000 POUNDS, 

In Turned Te»t Pieces, 
With or without uie of Charcoal Pig Iron. 

ADDRESS 

ASA W. WHITNEY, 

ItiOl CalloM'hill Street, 

PniLADELPniA, PENN. 




SUodi Unrlvulcd for Safetr, EcODony aid OanMlitf. 
FKTalibcB Dry Sleaoi Rapidly. 

ABENDROTH & ROOT MFG. CO. 

28 Cllft Street, New York. 




"CAHALL' 

Vertical Water Tube Boilers. 

BABCOCK & WILCOX 

Horizontal Water Tube Boilers. 



AULTMAN & TAYLOR MACHINERY CO. 

mansfield, ohio. 

Send for Illustrated Catalooue. 

CAHALL sales DEPARTMENT: 

Biak ol Coairerce Building, Plllibutgh. Pa. 
lel BIdfl . Philadelphia. Pa. Tha Rarkcri. Chleaoo. 

or BIdg . N«i. Tark. H. T. Cioahoga Bldg..Clmal«iid,0. 

noni BIdg., BoilDn. Mall. Partn BIdg.. Cincinnati. 0. 

lniularBankBldg.,D*lrolt,lllch. TliUnl«nSL,H.Orl«in*.La. 



K kVcAu (A 'CtM.V^, 



Who knowi about mine*; 



rTHEY A.^ •••TOR- "^ 

SPEAK I Themselves. J 

I Gear Cutters... s^>'A>^yiykM.»,/,^«,^ j 




Ebcrbardl'i Pucnt 
"New IVpc," "Mth Ccotarr" Oeir Cntler. I 



MJ^ 



1 Ohio State Univermty, 



'^* i Shapers... 







DOUBLE TBIPLLOUJLLK STROKE 

Eberhardl's Patent " Extension Base " Shaper. 



GOULD & EBERHARDT, 



NEWARK, I »"■' .""'■'"« 



rr High Class Machine Tools, Vi. i-,:,.;.^, 

To judge by all ucio. 



S duuji for Prof. Sedgwick, 




Automatic Engines 



SIMPLE AND COMPOUND 
ROLLINS ENGINE COMPANY, ji NASHUA, N. H. 




AT THE ARMORY. 
Col. CotnmMidaDt I Tlut tut thrown your coo^nny into tucfi diiorier. Captain? 
Capt. A. : Plmw >ir, if i the peanut *helk the ladio in tfie K^liery ut Ibrowing. 



"VWi iakal Vo tcutMJM^ 



Vbo lectoMi on gcnni, 




Steam 
Engines 

tbofough technical 
training;, tb« bett 
mccfiuiiul t^Hf and 
good bminen mcthodi 
an cMcntiaL 

The Ball 5 Wood Go. 

Onice : 

No. I» LIBERTY ST^ 

NEW YORK. 

Worki: 

ELIZABETH. N.J. 




TECHNIQUE ADVERTISER- 



.«Buckepe Engine Companp.. 

SALEM, OHIO. 

Horizontal and Vertical Enoines 




Condensing and Non-Condensing, Simple, Compound 
Multiple Cylinder, for all Classes of work. 



and 



Boston Oitfk 



. 415 John Hancock 



UNENE>:47*CO 



BiipluvL» Angela, K 

The "LINENE" arc the Beit and Most 
Econotiiical Colbn and Cuffs womi tbey at 
made oi fine clalti, both sides finislied alike, 
and) bcioe reversible, one collar is equal to two 
of any outer kind. 

Tbcy look like linen, and are the only ^oodt 
tlut a well-dretied gcnllenian can wear in place 
of real linen. 

They are not to be washed : all laundry trou- 
ble and expente are avoided. 

They are perfect fitting, retaining Iheir shape 
better than any other goods. 

A boi of Ten Collars or Five Pairs of Cuff* 
for Twenty-five Cents. 

A Sample Collar and Pair of Cuffs by mail 
for Six Cents. Name style and size. 

ReiKr$lbk Collar Comoanp, 

77 Franklin Street, New York. 
27 Kilby Street, Boston. 



* HOISTING ENGINES 



For Engineers, Builders, Mines, Fur- 
naces, Pile Driving, Excavating, etc 




Durable... 
efflckm. 



i^ldseriDood manufactuiins Co> 

86 Liberty Street, New York. 

CHIOAQO. J^jm 



TECHNIQUE ADVERTISER. 



CROSBY 



Steam Gage and 

Valve Company. 




The Crosby Steam Engine 
Indicator 

Stands unrivalled for Perfection of Design and Workmanship 
and for the remarkable accurncv of its diagrams. 

It is the Standard in Electric Light and Electric 
Railway Stations. 

When required, the Crosbv Indicator will be furnished 
with SflRCENT's Electrical Attachment, by which any num- 
ber of diagrams may t>e taken simultaneously. 




Crosby 
Patent Qage Tester. 




Crosby 
Pop Safety Valve. 

ipproved by the United Slates 
Pop Safety Valve. Government. (j,ge T*«t*r. 

The Crosby Indicator, tosether wltli the Crosby Pop Safety Valve, Water Relief Valve, 
Muffled Pop Safety Valve, Improved Steam Pressure Qa^e, Pressure Recording Qage, Safety 
Water QaEe, Revolution Counter, Original Single Bell Chime Whistle, Spring Seat Globe and 
Angle Valves, Bosworth Feed-Water Regulator, Branden Patent Pump Valve, and many other 
Specialties used in connection with Steam, Air and Water, are 

MANUFACTURED ONLY BY THE 

CROSBY STEAM QAQE AND VALVE CO., 

rialn Office and Works: Stores: Boston, New York, Chicago, 

BOSTON, MASS., U. S. A. and London, Eng. 

QaM nadal. Ptlt. 1889 ; Hcdal and Diploma. Chleato. IS93 : OoM /IsiUI and Dlplona, AllanU, I89S. 




American 

(is? 

THOMPSON IMPROVED 

%® Indicator. 

MORE THAN 10,000 IN USE. 



Read the following; tesdmonials from Eminent 
Engineers who have used this Indicator. 



Cincinnati, O., March S, 18S9. 
Amekican Steam Gauge Co., Boslon. 

GtmlUmen : — I have used ThompBon Steam En- 
gine Indicatois for fifteen years, in fact, ever Eince 
thev were Hret introduced, and have at all limes, and 
under all conditions of engine service, found them 
entirely reliable. In all my experience I have never 
had occasion to complain of the manner in which 
they performed, and if I were buying Indicators 
(o-dfly I should buy the Thompson. 

I do not know that I can express my regard for 
these invaluable instruments in any stronger lan- 
guage. Very respecifully, 
J ^y jji 



"JOHN \ 



HILL, C.E. 



Ithaca, N.Y., March u, 18S9. 
GtntUmeH : — It gives me great pleasure to s.iy 
that the Instruments sent us have proved lo be of 
most excellent quality, anil so far as our worlt has 
given opportunity to judge, of great accuracy. We 
have used them on all kinds of work, and nt speeds 
of rotation up to 300, and have found them capable 
of doing admirablv. The finish is excellent, and the 
sizes and fits all that could be asked. They have 
been very useful, both in class work and in making 
engine trials, and eminently satisfactory In all re- 
spects. We have had no' didicullles with them 
except such as have come from their use by inex- 
perienced hands. When used for instruction, an 
occasional accident is to be expected. They have 
withstood such injuries quile as well as we Ought to 



expect, and have done more work and better work, 

even in such hands, than I had supposed possible. 

Very respectfully vours, 

R. H. THURSTON, Director. 

Milwaukee, Wis., March 14, 1889. 
American Steam Gauue Co.. Boston, Mass. 

(ientiemen : — I have used all the prominent 
makes of Indicators, but very much prefer the 
Thompson, and believe it has mor« good pointi 
and less faults than any other instrument made. 
The easy changing of springs, good leading pulley 
for the cord, general convenience in handling, and 
last, hut certainly not least, its ability to stand 
abuse, are some of the features that commend it 
to the practical engineer. Yours truly, 

IRVING H. REY'nOLDS. 



OtKteofthet 



D HaCLA-MlHl 



Iting EnEinat 



Cambridgeport, Mass., March 6, iSfy 
American Steam Gauge Co., 

36 Chardon Street, BoatoD. 
GemlUiuea :—l have lo say that «fler quite an 
extensive use of the Thompson Indicator, I am po^ 
suaded that it is a most excellent instrument, aMl 
that my confidence in the same is proven bj tlK 
orders from lime to time sent your companj. 
"' irs truly, 
AVITT, 



E. D LEAVITT, Consulting Engl m 



MANUFACTURED SOLELY BY 



AMERICAN STEAM GAUGE CO., 

36 Chardon Street, BOSTON, MASS. 
New York Bniacb: ZO Clltl SI., New Y»rk. N. Y. Westcrii Brucb: IS West Uke Slicct. CHKAOO, n 



Ht TcalVf 'u ti<A W& % 



So dieadfully fMMdi 



The 

Lunkenheimer | 

Company ^^^ 

Brass and Iron ^^,^, 

Makers of ' ' ' — 

'""""' Specialties.... g^-- 

Lunkenheimer's Steam Spccia]tiesj«M«»j« 

arc considered the besl of their kind made, and are liberally used 
and indoned by intelligent steam usees every^vhcre. None as 
good as Lunkenheimer's if you want the best. J>Jt AH Goods 
tested and warranted, i^t^ Our Catalogue will interest you ; 
gratis upon request. 

Headquarters : 

CinCinnfltl. 3$ Oreal Dover SlrKt.LOND0N,S. t. 




w 



arret! 



\r„,ur:uu,nrrs<.r 106 aad IM Llberlr Sired. 

Electrical and Hecbanlcal Autoiutlc NEW YORK. 

MACHINERY AND SUPPLIES 




P. F, 



reeman 



Co, 





/\ 




Electrical and Mechanical EoglDMrinf. 



Black u— tui beud. 



U is any Piafowr 



I he Loss (rom Frictioa with SKde 
Valvtt oitcn rivi to 25 
I cvCn to SO per cent, 
I and valve itciiu ue often 
broken." Tbiirsloii on Fn'e- 
1,0,1, pjgt 235. 




Bflieriiiaii Baiaoce Sime Valve. 



The Detroit 

Sight Feed Lubricators, 
for lubricating the valves 
and cvlindcn of Locomo- 
tive Engine*, Statkmary 
Engines, Compound and 
Triple Expansion Engines, 
Hoisting:, Traction, and 
Portable Ennnes, Steam 
Pumps, Gai Ennnes, Air 
Compressors, IceMachinet, 
etc They have no equal. 
More tbid 300,000 of 
tbcm are la use la all 
parti of the world. 



DETROIT > LUBRICATOR j«CO. 

DETRtMT, RDCH. 




Beveled Packing Ring 

Self-Suppoi ting J* Setf-Adjusting. 

No SpringlS. Jt jIDiKt (or Cooes) are bolted « 
cast wUd on valve. 




Jersey Shore. Pa., or 

San Franoiboo. Cal 




The Bachelder 

Adjustable Spring Indicator and Ideal 
Reducing Wheel. 

A complete outfit for indicating. No cfiange of spring. Dircd 
connection from indicator to cross-bead. ConpUU, Cottlpacl, and Rt^ 
hablc. Always ready for use at any speed or prcsnire. This instru- 
ment received the blShCtl aioard at the World's Columbian Ezpon- 
tion, Chicago, for coniKiileticE, mtcDanical construction, and accn^ 
racp uiidtT all prtuurt. 



THE SPENCER DAMPER REGULATOR. 

BRISTOL RECORDING PRESSURE GAUGES. 

POLAR PLANIMETERS. 

INJECTOR BLOWER AND SOOT SUCKER, for oieak- 

■HO OOILER TUBES. 

STATtONARY.SHAKINGANO DUMPING GRATE BARS. 



THOMPSON & BUSHNELLueue 110 Liberty street, New York, N.Y. 



T^fTt^wT ^^ wcu&\nS^«a 



Ttio's cuniag tite Boudf 



LOCKE REGULATOR CO., 



OF SALEM, MASS., 



i the manufacture of Automatic Regulators in 1870, and consequently are 
the oldest and m(»t extensive manufacturers of this class of steam and water appli- 
ances in the world. Large Illustrated catalos:ue mailed free upon application. >>* j* .!* j* 




lii% Pp] J^ CHECK JL^ 



mxmmmm^ 




EiMER & Amend, 



Chemicals and Cbemkal ilpparatus 

Axay Goodiand 
Bactcriologica] Apparatus; Acidi, PUtinucn, 



jtJtjtj»Jtj*J*Jtjtj»J*JtjtJt 



Curtis 



Steam Pressure Regulators. 
Water Pressure Regulators. 
Pump Pressure Regulators. 
Balanced Steam Traps. I 
Return Steam Traps. 
Steam and Grease Separator. 
Temperature Regulators. 
Steam Damper Regulators. 

In TECHNIQUE axt icoTcd. 



Manufactured by 



i i Seeleg Co., 



29-33 Haverhill St, 

Boston* Klajs. 



TECHNIQUE ADVERTISER. 



Geo. N. Saeqmuller... 



FAITTH ft CO. 



manuraclurer or... 

jlstrononiical and 

engineering--^ , 

Instruments 

WasMngton, D. C. 

^XTE c*ll Mp c cial attentioa to out newly improved 

EngiMcn' Traniit wttli bevel limb gnduition. 

Thi* indrument caimol be excelled for accuracy or 



Stnd for Caialo9iK... 




I '^' «'Eil^;;; Cpcioromic Cr ansits 

422 SACRAMENTO ST., SAN FRANCISCO. CAL. 







1 wonder who this maiden is, I've drawa 
Id moments from a stupid lecture lorn? 
The bold, frank glance is Edith'*, I am sure ; 
That mouth belongs to Alice, the demure; 
The rich, dark hair retembles Anna's, quite t 
And Caroline's the shoulders, datiling white, — 
But hush,— I ihooUn't like the giHs to fed 
A simple composite was my ideal I 



TECHNIQUE ADVERTISER. 



75 



Baker & Co-o^o^ 



Manufacturers 
of. 



trPLATDSfUM 



APPARATUS 
OF ALL KINDS FOR 
LABORATORY 
a>d CHEIVllCAL 
PURPOSES. 



NEWARK, N,].^^M 



j^l BISHOP & CO. 

Manufacturers of 

Hammered Platinum Ware of 
all kinds, guaranteed free of 
blisters or f{aws.*^*^*^*^^^^^ 
All articles of Platinum remade 
or repaired at reasonable rates 
and guaranteed* .^^.i^Send for 
circular and prices* 

OB 

SUGARTOWN, ^ PA^ 



Franklin Educational Company, 



HAROOURT STREET, BOSTON. MASS. 



Importers and Manufactur- 
ers of Chemicalt Physical 
and Biological Jt Jt Jt ^ 



Eaboratorp Apparatus 



SOLE AGENTS IN THE UNITED STATES FOR THE SALE OF 

NACHET & FILS ^^MICROSCOPES. 

These Microscopes surpass all others in definition, and have been adopted by the leading scientific and 
educational institutions of France. They are now constructed with special reference to the opinions of American 
scientists, to whom we offer them with entire confidence of their approval. 

Attention is invited to two new qualities of MICROSCOPIC SLIDES : 

THE FRANKLIN, thin white g:lass, with ground edges, superior to any ever before 

shown by us $\M per gross. 

No. 4008, medium thick, white glass, ground edges J.00 per gross. 

A large stot k of other Slides for $0.35 a gross and upward. Platinum Crucibles, wire and foil, at low- 
est market prices. Logarithm Tables, printed on heavy board, 9 t-2 x 14 1-2 inches, price $0.25* Full line of 
Forceps Scissors, Staining Jars, Watch Glasses, Dissecting Sets. Stains, Dyes. etc. Send for catalogue. 



CHICAGO... 



FRANKLIN EDUCATIONAL COMPANY. 



...BOSTON. 



FARBENFABRIKEN OF ELBERFELD CO. 

77 William Street, New York. 68 Batterymardi Street, Boston. 

H5 Kinzie Street, Chicago. U North Front Street, Philadelphia. 

ANILINE COLORS, 

ALIZARINE, 

DYESTUFFS. 

Sok Importcn of the weU-knowa ALIZARINE and direcl dydag BENZIDINE COLORS. Manufacttnd 

by Faibenfabfikeo, vormals FrUdr. Bayer & Co., ElbtrfcM and Barmen, Germany. 

Soir Agenb of (bt Hudsoa River Anitinc Color Tories, Albany, N. Y. 

SPECIALTIES^ FAST BLACK FOR WOOL. FAST BLACK FOB COTTON. AND ALSO FOR MIXED GOODS. 



Principal Advantages: ^^^I^^^^^^^^^EHIH ^'^''^ Obtainable: 

siMPUCiTV- I etm W!^^v& il 1 1 waM white- 



perm an ENCV— 



)EROXIDE 

SodiJav 



No yellowing »ii!i 
nATERIAI^ 



THE ROESSLER & HASSLACHER p„*a„w,n.j 

OFFICE. PeroxlitWofk,; 

EW VOKK. CHEMICAL CO. Ni.f:...F.ll.,N.V. 



\ni^&n iSit v^mtwn 



I 



Explanatory pamphlet on : 



I 



Whose namct as Fve heardt 



77 



WM. PICKHARDT & KUTTROFR 

BAOISCHE ANILIN A SODA FABRIK, SPECIAL PARTNER. 

NEW YORK- 
BOSTON. 
PROVIDENCE. 
PHILADELPHIA. 
CHICAGO. 

Importers of 

Aniline and Alizarine Dyes^ 

and all other Coal Tar Colors. 

Technical Chemicals, Liquid Chlorine, 
Anhydrous Sulphuric Acid. 

Also Fiiaung, all strengths. 



O. S. JANNEY & CO. 



IMPORTERS AND DEALERS IN 



DIGO, 

CHEMICALS, 

DYE-STUFFS, 

ANILINE COLORS, 
ETC 



w 70 Kflby Street, 



BOSTON. 



No& 8 and 10 Letitia Street, 



PHILADELPHIA. 



Cable Address : Klipstein, New York. 
A. B. C. Code used. 

A. Klipstein & Co. 



%^«c^ 



124 Michigan Street, Chicago. 
122 Pearl Street, New York. 
a8) Congress Street, Boston. 
tao Arch Street, Philadelphia. 
And Hamilton. Ontario. 



CHEMICALS 

ANILINE DYES 

COAL TAR PRODUCTS 



^ 
^ 
^ 



ALPHA NAPHTOL 

BETA NAPHTOL 

ALPHA NAPHTYLAMINE 

BETA NAPHTYLAMINE 

METATOLUILIN-DIAMINE 

DIANISIDINE 

BETA OXY-NAPHTOIC-ACID 

NITRITE SODA, ETC., ETC. 



Is rather a "bird." 



\ 



ThcK'i TiUiacn H. Talker, 




'WORKS ACT ZVEWAHKiZfEW OERSEr. 



CHARLES COOPER & CO., »* Worlh street, New York. ) ,^We maciitictiire ■ fill llie 1 

,»^ 1 * I « f Cbenicsli. Medidoal aai tor Oc 

nanutaclutiBS CTeillBtS am ImpOrtCri. ) ,„, „d T<tk.lcl p«rp«<u>4 



BI-SULPHDE 
OF CARBON 

EDWARD R. TAYLOR, 
CLEVELAND, ^ OHIO. 



"•LISTER'S 
Agricultural Chemical Works 

Sole Manufacturers and Pfoprietots of 

aU Brands of Lister Bros. 

Fertilizers. 

,» 

Bone Black, Bone Grease, 
Asphaltum Substitute, Glue, 

BULPHATE AMMONIA. ETC. 

J« 

Principa] Office At Works, NcwArk, New Jcney. 
J« 

Offi«,: Chamber of Comintrce Building, R«h«WrN. v.. 
MaDd BuildlnK, Ulica, K.Y.: ,0, Rxctaang, Fl,«, B.ltlow. 
Md : Ponlind. M,.; 159 Front Streel. tie* York. 

Stock Yard : Netv York, loot Sfflh Sltoet. Nonh Riv,r. 



TIm)'« nunicd, I bur t 




CHEMICALS 



Medicinal, Analytical, 
and Technical Purposes. 



MERCK &<X). 



CHASE & BISSELL, 

(M. I. T, I8BI.} 

manufacturing Cbemtsts 



Versailles, Allcfrheny Co^ Pa. 

(NeAR PiTTSBURO.) 



■nd Scientific P 



oe 



SS KILBV STREBT, BOSTON. 



Oil Vitriol, Sulphate o( 

Muriatic Acidf Aqua Ammonui, 
Nitric Acids, Sulpiute erf Soda, 

Muriate* of Tin, Staonatc of Soda, 
Alum, Chloride Alucoina, 

Extract <rf Indigv, Glauber's Salt, Acetic Acid, 

Tin Cryttab, Oxy. Mur. Autimoiiy. 

SGzed Addt for Nitro Glycerine, CeUuloid, etc, and 

various other Chemicals. 



EVERETT, MASS. 



The baker & ADAMSON 

Chemical 
ompatre, 

Chemically Pure 

Muriatic, Nitric, 
ami Sulphuric Acids 
and Ammonia. 

Chemically Pure Salts. 

Ashless Filter Papers. 

EASTON, PENN. 



X will be on itutructoTr 




Marion: "Tht busy bee improves each shining hour, you know." 
Hclcai "What B? O, the bootbUck, I HippoM." 



'^UVl fa&enct unu\£at%. 



So genik and kind) 



ALBERT B. FRANKLIN. 



APPARATUS FOR 



Vanning and Ventilating 



BV STEAII OR WATER. 



>HEET HETAL WORK A SPECIALTY. 



i65 and 167 Fort HUl Square, 



BOSTCHM, MASS. 



WARREN'S ANCHOR BRAND 

Natural Asphalt Roofing 

Has had a Test of ov«r 18 Years. 



r IB ON BUCH BUILDINGS AS 

Allcshcny County CounhouH and Jail, PilUburg. Pa. 
State Unlvtrilty Library, MlnnMpoll*. Mlaa. 
Unlan Lcaiuc ClubhouH, New York. 
United Bank Bulldlns, New Vork. 
Lucai County CourthoUM, Tolida, Ohio. 
HOMB Saviors Bank Building, Detndt, Mkh. 



This Roofing is manufaclured from Trinidad Natural 
j Asphalt, and will not dry up and become brittle under 
I exposure to Ihe weather, as coal-tar roofings do. We 
shall be pleaseil to furnish samples of our Anchor Brand 
Asphalt Cement and felt, that have been in use for ove>' 
fifteen years and show no signs of deterioration. S«nd 
for samples, circulars. specification forms, and estimates 

Warren Chemical and Manfg. Co. 

I TS Fullon SIrcet, NEW YORK, U. S.A. 



TRUE MERIT BRINGS SUCCESS ! j The Winslow Brothers Company, 

^ - - ■ CHICAGO. ■ 

WE MANUFACTURE ONLY THE | ORNAHENTAL EIT"" 

test Parlor, Barn and Fire-Door l Iron Bronze = 

TRACK AND HANGER. and Brass Work. 




oburn Trolley Track Manufacturing Co. 

HOLVOKE. MASS. 

A postal card will get our Catalogue, etc. 



And broad, gctWTom routi. 



Y arc all the Ainitaols, 





The Century Dictionarr says of Creosote : [ Th* «« o* l** 

"Voodtiutcd with it is not nib^ to dry rotor other I FolsOIll Patfillt SllOW Gtiards 
™*y' upon ikte, dilngle, or tik raob prcvenlx the atow I 

*^^5#i^''TR^ ^ "^v * / from »liditiP. ' 

V 

Cabot's G-eosote Shingle Stains 

Arc Citowtc colored to the most beautiful shades 
of inoM green, ulver gray, tobacco brown, etc. 
They arc not opaque, hke paint, but so transpar- 
ent that the grain of the wood shows through 
them. 50 per cent cheaper than paint. 
Bend for Hmpiia on Wood ■ni] Color Sludici. 

SAMUEL CABOT, Sole Manufacturer, 

70 Kilby Street, Bodoo, Mass. 

Cabot'* Sheatblns " Quilt "—d»dcn* Mund In floor*. 




FOLSOM SNOW GUARD CO, 

178 DevofuhiK Street, Bortoo, Mw. 



^\ta to cA& ^l^m^.\^a.^ltt 




Slpbon 

eaucnon 
Rans« 
Closets and 
Urinals 

Are sanitary 
ipccialtUc wl)kh 
you should know 



We also nuk( the 
Rhodes> Tillianu, 
and Fitid Taring 
Automatic Sewer 
Flushing Siphons, 
Yetive Aiitoanatic 
T'ankBf and other 



Specialtie*. 



Flush Tank G)mpany, 

'^^ *"*'• Aurora, Ulinois. MooaMt pant 



Jill our stplKH* 
optratt wtiDoui 



6eo» C. eujing, 

€kctric Railipap 
equipment.... 

620 jlllaiitic ;iKnue, 
Boston. 



THE inm flnnortii ComlDli Sgslem 

Interior Gmduit and Insulation Ca 

COMPLETE SYSTEM OF ELECTRIC 
TIRING. 

Interior Conduit and Insulation 
Company, 

General Office* and Torks: 

527 West 34th Str«t, New York, N. Y. 



Full informatiMi apoo application. 



Have IoyilUy c\unc 



Z itaiidi fof "Doc" Ripky'i mkiK 



The WESTON 

Standard Voltmeters and 
Ammeters. 

JtJt Portable .» J< Accunic ^ Jt Rdiabic ^jC 




INSULATED 

Wires and Cables 



^^.oN/^: 



WESTON ELECTRICAL INSTRUMENT COMPANY, 

II4-120 Wllllun SlTMt, Niwark. N. J. 



' For Aerial, Submarine, and Under- 
I ground Use. 

TRANSMISSION OF POWER, TIRING 
BUILDINGS. ETC 

General Offices, 253 Broadway, New York. 




siamiarii DQieigroiil Came Co. i 

LEAD-COVERED .' 

Cables I 

Fibre, Paper, Rubter, | 



r AND POWER. 

AERIAL, UNOERQROUND. SUBMARINE. 



The Standard Open-Qrcuit Batteries Weatherproof Wire and Calfa. 

OF THE WORLD. ' High-grade Robber-covered Wire. 

Conduits Furnished and InftaUoL 



THE LECLANCHE BATTERY CO, 

III TO NT E*ST 131st Street. New Vork, 



Pitttburs. 

St. Louii. 



New Yofk. Ouafo. 

Philadelphu. 



L stands at the head of the list; even so. 



85 



PATRIDGE & MACULLAR, 



Fire 
Insurance 



59 KILBY STREET, 



Eugene E. Patridge. 
Charles E. Macullar. 



Boston. 



The Forbes Lithograph 

Mfg* Co* BOSTON, MASS. 



M Made the 
Albertyped 
inserts 
in this 

BOOK, 

and they 
invite the 
correspondence 
of other College 
Annual Editorial 
Boards in regard 
to the same 
class of work* 



* % 



ii- 









Ulmbr Leather Co. 



MANUFACTURERS OP 



J^ PURE OAK TANNED ^ 



frank ISImer. 
Rcnrp f . ISImer. 



Xeatber JSeltina 



NORWICH, CONN. 



But the first shall be last, ais we vetv ^c!i\>ui<cs^« 



86 n« Many there are whot though versed in machtnei, 



l»arlin Rifles -i*^ 

are made to gioe $ati$ractloit. 

They are the only Repeating Rifles with Solid 
Top and Side Ejection* They possess the 
further advantage of being made in Take- 
Down form in all the various styles* 




The Take-Down I^e with half octagon bar- 
rel, half magazine and pistol grip stock, with 
Can be FurnisiKd in au rubber butt-plate, is the best balanced and 

Styles and Caiibtes. neatest repeating rifle made. 



SEND FDR CATALOGUE TO 



THEojMARLINajFlREufARMSafCO. 



NEW HAVEN, CONN. 



E. S. RITCHIE & SONS, 



Physical and School Apparatus, 

Cypress Street, BROOKLINE, MASS. 

Apparatus for X-Ray Work, Induction Coils, etc. 



I 



About aU o\!bet «vi^O()cc\& doo^V t«i2^^ >esl;s^ ^m»s&« 



Coune m. is for men who abhor menUl woik, 



XCbere'8 a ^lcl)inDn6 In the fielb. 



YYVYVYy-rVfy VYYYYV^VVYYrY'rVrYVYyV-:^ -rr YY rrTY tVTYt'YYY iVrr YW^VtSV 




XKKKKK'■,,KK'■J■■AvKKKK^J■■^^J^^ ^ K KK <■^-Q^^ J■J^J■•^J~^^ .KKKKKi■^^ 



Rigid Frames, $100.00 and $75.00. 

Cushion Frames, $U0.00 and $85.00. 



HA^D50ME 



I APPLICATION. 



Richmond Bicpck Co. 



RICHMOND, IND. 



Eutcm Bnutctit 97 Oumfaen Street, NewYorkJtj) 



But bve in the coal-iiat of Rogcn to tutk. 



^IGCLOW (jr D0W5E COAPAI^^ 

ZZ') riiA:^KLI^ STREET, 

B $ D Special ana Uloria 




^BICYCL-ES 



Boylston Cycle Company, ""KS." Local Agts. 



1 Vuvc ncvu ftn>n& ou^ 'w^a). 'ft ttili.'i \S iw. 



Gnme V* men discourse on such subjectsy I ween, 



89 



O O O O O O O O O O OIO o o o o o o o o 



A Wise Investment 

at the Beginning Prevents Dissatisfaction 
and Sorrow Later. 

The riders of the famous C3UMSON RIM 
SYRACUSE WHEEL are a thoroughlv 
contented and happy lot. A word with 
them will prove the truthfulness of our 
statement. 

There is Joy and Pleasure in the 
Crimson Rims. 

There is but one Crimson Rim — 
ft is THE SYRACUSE. 

Makers: SYRACUSE CYCLE CO., Syracuse, N. Y. 

Metropolitan Agent, C. J. STBBBINS, 103 Seade St., New York. 



010:0:0 GO GO 0:0 0:0:0:0 010:0:0:0:0 



Technology Co-operative Store, 



A D. Madachlan^ 

Proprietor. 



No. 214 Garendon Street, 
Boston, Mass. 

Lowest Prices on 

All kinds of Artists' Materials, 
0^ Engineers' and Draughtsmen's Suppliesocoeaeae 

Students' Stationery, etc., etc* 



As tri-methyl-para-^^S!uif--axuls&)t« 



VL Some tvika think ihockiog ; but never you mind t 




It's L tOf^ Ain't cunoA, '^w£% ^mfcalti.'i fisd. 



VIIL (irit to one taut ii the usual proportion F 



Tbe "Best" Sills Qaicitsl abnt Competili 



The Point... ^fl^^^ 

We are determined to make is to have the 
"WINDSOR" before every 1897 buyer in the 
United States. Wc have renewed contracts with 
all our former agents; have added nearly 200 
more to our list, but still have good territory 
uncovered. 

FE OFFER TERMS THAT OTHERS CANT, for fewon 
tbat Mir volume o[ business permits us maldag more liberal 
terms than any other high-erade bicycle manufacturers in Write at OOCe. 



TANTIfD— A«Emr Jn VDur Joc^ililY if 
■here IB not one there nou. Men nf hl'i^h- 

fcllow.T'\v7itl:at'oH«'lo'ciiAKLe*''H! 
SiiG Mfo. Co., Kenoiha, Wli., U. S. A. 



KENOSHA WIS. 



firsts ud Copper In Rolls, Sheet, Rodv Tubes and Wire. Brass and Copper Seamless Tubas. 




HELMET BRAND SOLID OIL, The Best Lubricant. PERFECTION OIL CUP For Helmet Ofl 



That Btolo^ Counc should be caUttA 'w\\h. CAu'i^na. 



YouHl find that Come VIIL'i > dduaum and marc, 




UnUx you'tc i. fpini Vilik VixunvtA. \iaai. 



DC Muses there were; and there's one course to-day 



93 



Ropal iUorcester 



Cpcles 



7 n^odeis... 



€a$p Runnlns 



M^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ ^^^ 



.," 



3^ou Select 
a iUDeel 

;or pour riding, 
consult a rider 
or experience**.. 



A VOID the advice of a new rider, for he will be 
prejudiced without knowledge* ^ ^ j^ ^ Make 
diligent inquiry as to quality. ^ Learn' if the Cycle 
has established a reputation for strength, durability 
and speed* ^ c^ ^ Don^t hurry ; take time and select 
the best* t^ t^ In the 

Ulorcester Cpcks^ 

every ball in the bearings rolls, reducing friction to 
the minimum* ^ Its frame is most rigid ; the enamel 
the hardest that can be put upon wheels; and in 
every feature the Worcester Wheels are unsurpassed 
for quality* 



Send for... 
Catalogue 



Worcester Cpcle P)rg, Co, 

1 7 l»urrap $t, Deu) 3Pork CItp 



Where in profitless musing they ^a^a \ixcut %.^Vf « 



94 



A scanty half dozen of boldt desperate men^ 



This Book is printed and bound by 



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Frank Ulood, 
printer, 

1)0. 352 Ulasblnstoti Street, 

Boston. 



Telephonet Boston 275. 



■^•••■•ima, ■•<•■, .••■l■■•■.I••<l>■•l■l■••ll■••>l■•■l■^< 

? i 

I prompt Dcliocrp. ? 

\ full Count I 

! £ou)c$t prices, j 

Best Work. 




«l«llll«llll«|l|;l|ll|ll»«'l|ll|l«l ■ .■. I::!!,! '■. ■:)■ l|il|"a- ■l« IB l| 



Special Attention given to 

School and G>llege Work 



Each year mu8\et coun^c \.o XajcSs^it CAvasvt'^ 



XI» has studeotsy if pocsiblct fewer; 



9S 



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Illustrations in this Book made by 



Cbe Boston ^ 
-♦Cnsraolng Co* 



•UCCCttORt TO 



Che Boston €iidraoiiid and iHclndoe ptg. Co. 

CIK BlancDard ^ Watts €ndraoind Co. 
pi)oto=€ndraoind Dept. of C. 3. peters Ss Son. 



J* 

Makers of 

Higfh-Gradct Half-Tone and 

Line Plates. 

J* 

50^ Hartford and 113 PurcDaK $ts. 
Boston, mass. 



Who leara how to bvnld aind to dun. (mA. «. «tw«t. 



Coune Xn. inclttdit knowledge irf emcraU and tard t 

ACCIDENTS WILL HAPPEN 

POXiyS EXTnACT—The SUiyeter't SwsemUy, 

-J. DON'T RIDEWITHOUtT'' 

£=^ A Repair Kit. 

POND'S EXTRACT is unequaled l_ 
for quickly heating all kinds of WOUNDS, 
BRUISES, LAMENESS or S0RENE5S of 
MUSCLES, ABRASIONS, RHEUMATISM. 

Bub thoroughly with POND'S EXTRACT after 

every ride to keep the muedee Btippte, plinnt, strong. 

Try POND'S EXTRACT OiyTMEKT for PiLEa. 

AVOID 8UB8TITUTE8-Weak, Watery, Worthless. 

POND'S EXTRACT CO., 7« Fifth Ave., New York. 





Perfoms all 
Arillinietical PtoMmu 



The COMPTOMETER 



Wriie (or I'^iinphlel. 



t Chl»l Consiru^iois ind CompLiIng EnBlneeu q 
I'rfet?, Sliifj.OO to »3eo.OO. 

FELT & TARRANT MFG. CO, 

52 to 56 nUnois Street, 



CHICACa I 



The v^biccV u toA.'j, u>& w»^x. \ji "m. "ttMi. 



^ 



xiu. Is onluckyf as Frotkincii will Elndt 




Tbe DROSOPHORB m>ke« ■ perfect 
5|^nn<ns or Weavlni: atmospbera In any 
cllnute or weather. Any decree ot Hunld- 
<ty Is obUlnable. Will warm the air In 
cold weather and cool It In hot weather. 
PurMcA the air, and I* healthier tor the 
workpeople 




... A Mini, im ... 



ZU American DrosopDore Co- 



WILLIAM FIRTH. 

(50 DEVONSHIRE STREET, 



Tke Gold Mcdil... 



mble Noiile Dro sophore 

ha* no wearing part*. uic5 
las water, glvei a finer . . 
eptay and more humidity 
tbaa any other lorm of . . . 
HuBldllter. 




THREE 

jt GOLD MEDALS Jt 

AWARDED. 



The ibovE compiny hu 
Mivtnd iinu February, 1895, 
over SflOO of thetc " i^rh iiifi. 



.. AtlaiU EifHttha, 



^WILLIAM FIRTH, 



Textile Machinery 



Hardened and Tempered 
Steel Card Qotliing, . . . 
Needle Pointed. 



Sole Importer of Hetherington's Patent Revolving Top- 
Flat Carding Engines, Combing Machines, Drawing 
Frames. Roving Frames and Self-Acting Mules, j* j* J^ 



Also Ramsden Bros. & Stephenson 

Worsted Machinery-, 

on French and English Systems. 



ISO Devonshire Street, 



Tho endeavor to leun how i. csniat^x dM%i«A. 



L^ 



^^